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What do you do if a snake bites you? You are in the wilderness, the closest hospital is miles away. Is that sure death?

 

Does sucking the venom with your mouth helps?

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I have NO idea.  Basically, I live in one of the smallest states here.  So I am never that far out that I couldn't get to a hospital.  I think if it would happen to me.  I would die either way.  I would die from a heart attack.  I can't stand snakes.  :hugegrin:

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Well i know to lie still and apply a tourniquet above the area, i wasn"t sure about sucking the venom out so i looked it up in a book & found tha you cut with a razor between the 2 fang holes and squeeze the blood and venom out , it said not to suck out the venom because the bacteria in your mouth could cause a infection . I don"t know about u but the last thing i"d be worried about is a infection!!!

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Well i know to lie still and apply a tourniquet above the area, i wasn"t sure about sucking the venom out so i looked it up in a book & found tha you cut with a razor between the 2 fang holes and squeeze the blood and venom out , it said not to suck out the venom because the bacteria in your mouth could cause a infection . I don"t know about u but the last thing i"d be worried about is a infection!!!

 

Never suck out venom.  If you so much as have one slight cavity or sore in your mouth, then you have just infected yourself.  Also it is best not to cut the site as this can cause secondary problems for the patient.  A suction device in a snake bite kit could help to pull out some venom.  best not to allow the victim to moveabout due to increased blood flow spreading the venom more rapidly.  Depending on the snake and what country you are in, some venomous snakes won't kill you unless you are severly allergic to them.  They can make you extremely ill though.

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There are snakes, the worse ones I suppouse, who can and will kill you if they bite. They provoke a heart attack or respiratory <don't know the word>.

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I had a snake bite when I was young and it was horrible that poor snake just twisted and withered, in a few minutes it was dead, never had a chance. :devil:

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Well i know to lie still and apply a tourniquet above the area, i wasn"t sure about sucking the venom out so i looked it up in a book & found tha you cut with a razor between the 2 fang holes and squeeze the blood and venom out , it said not to suck out the venom because the bacteria in your mouth could cause a infection . I don"t know about u but the last thing i"d be worried about is a infection!!!

 

Remember--a tourniquet will cause you to lose whatever is below it.  If you completely cut off circulation, the limb will die.  Venom from pit vipers (rattlesnakes, copperheads) doesn't move around that much, it tends to adhere to muscle tissue.  Some advocate a constriction band--basically a loose tourniquet, but the benefit is questionable. 

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Kentucky Bob has it square on.

 

Here is something you can picture clearly:

 

A lab dude had a small bowl of blood.  He eyedroppered a couple of drops of rattlesnake venom into the bowl.  TEN SECONDS LATER he upended the bowl... and removed it.

 

The blood had coagulated and looked like soft jell-o.

 

THAT is what happens when you are bit.  Here is a pic of my jeans where I got bit by a 6-foot, eight-inch rattler that weighed 22 pounds:

 

bite.jpg

 

This was where I was walking.  The yellow arrow shows where he got me  (I got my pcture tooken accidentally as I walked by my game camera on the way to blasting yet another rattler...):

 

glock1.jpg

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Light tourniquet above the wound. release every 15 minutes.  Seek help.  DO NOT suck the poison out with your mouth.  DO NOT cut the wound open to suck the poison out. You are not a doctor and can cause a lot more damage by cutting. Snake bites are genereally fatal to the elderly, children and sick people.  The average healthy person stands a good chance of survivng a snake bite (depends on snake I know).  It will probably make you sick enough that you wish you were dead though.

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Not a remedy, not having snakes around here, I am at disadvantage in my approach to snak bites but here goes. Would wearing leggings or chaps be an idea in snake country or would it be to much? And how thick would it have to be and in what material?

Not wanting to hijack the thread, I apologise.

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Well when I hike I wear gaiters.  They should offer some protection from snake bites.  Most snake bites are below the knee.  Thicker the material the better.  When I was catching rattlers for the Phoenix Zoo I met a snake handler who told me how he had some men come back form the desert and took off their snake boots.  A young man who was helping at the zoo put the boots in a storage locker.  The next day he complained of pain in his arm.  What had happened was that a snake had struck on of the mens boots and a fang had broken off in the boot.  When the young man was putting the boots away he stuck his hand in the boot to remove andy foreign material and got scratched by the fang.  Wearing pants or gaiters should offer some degree of protection rather than bare legs. 

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Ok this is coming from someone from the UK were we only have one venomous snake the adder but i have worked in many places snakes.

 

Snake venom comes in many different forms, some attack the blood as Unca has already said (Hay Unca i have seen that demo myself), another attacks the nervous system and the last attacks the body's cells killing them. So in the long run treatment is very different for each type of bite but that is not our concern, leave that for the pros.

 

It is important to remember that snakes dont only use venom to kill its pray they also use it as a form of defence. Most strikes on humans are defencive strikes and more often than not the snake will not inject a full load of venom, in fact they will only release a very small % of venom as they prefer to keep it for a second and third strike or more importantly for hunting. So if you do get hit by a snake move away quickly but once out of danger sit down and take stock of the situation. Wash the area of the bite with copiace amounts of water and gently pat dry. Now lightly bandage the limb above the point of the bite but leave bit exposed so the venom is able to flow from the puncture wound. Immobilise the limb and keep limb below heart level. Do not move around, stay as still and calm as possible.

 

Help need to be summoned and treatment for shock needs to be given along with being prepared to deal with vomiting, stopped breathing and stopped heart.

 

i

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it's said that it's good to

-not panic, not running without not having to

-kill the snake-if it's possible

-wash the bite with water but don't rub the wound

-aply bandage so the blood runs through the veins harder

-go to the hospital ...with the dead snake if possible

 

my girlfriend said that it's good to pour lemon juice on the wound

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Having once stepped on a Timber Rattler on a ridge in Southwestern Pennsylvania (it's a long story), I can speak from experience that they will try to get away from you if they can.

 

(By the way, they don't sound anything at all like the pebbles rattling in a bottle we have all heard in the cowboy movies, they sound a lot more like a locust buzzing - at least this one did.)

 

The advice about wearing good, ankle-high boots is good.

 

From my reading - not from recent experience, you understand - the recommended treatment is this: Along with your snakebite kit you should also carry a disposable razor, a few antiseptic wipes and a couple of lengths of dressmaker's elastic. (1) Wrap a piece of your elastic around the bitten limb above the area where the skin is coloring. Tighten it just enough so the skin turns white - and no tighter. This slows the advance of the venom towards your heart. (2) Shave the area around the bite. (3) Wipe with one of your antiseptic wipes. (3) Select the appropriate shaped suction tip and apply suction to the bite and leave it there. (4) Keep the bitten limb as low as possible. (5) Do not, under any circumstances, make XX cuts over the bite as we were told to make long ago when we were in the Scouts - or any other kind of cuts. They don't help and they can cause all kinds of damage to arteries, tendons, ligaments and all the other sorts of things we keep under the skin on our arms and legs.

 

Finally, Don't Panic! (that's easy for you to say!). Healthy adults don't die from snakebite if treated this way.

 

The bit about making lots of noise as you walk to warn them of your approach didn't seem to work in this case because there were about twelve of us walking up a fire road looking for a cave and we were anything but quiet.

 

I was walking in the tall grass because the dirt track was washed out and rough. When he rattled, I jumped. When we turned back to see if we could see him in the grass, he was moving quickly away from us.

 

It was an interesting - and instructive - experience!

 

Enjoy.

 

 

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Guest HazeyWolf

The best snake bite kit is a pair of car keys; if bitten by a snake, you shouldn't try to treat the bite yourself - but rather get to a doctor as quickly as possiblehttp://www.snakebite-firstaid.com/

 

It is not an easy task determining whether or not a bite by any species of snake is life-threatening. A bite by a copperhead on the ankle is usually a moderate injury to a healthy adult, but a bite to a child’s abdomen or face by the same snake may well be fatal. The outcome of all snakebites depends on a multitude of factors; the size, physical condition, and temperature of the snake, the age and physical condition of the victim, the area and tissue bitten (e.g., foot, torso, vein or muscle, etc.), the amount of venom injected, and finally the time is takes for the patient to be treated and the quality of treatment.

 

WHAT NOT TO DO:

 

-Application of a tourniquet to the bitten limb.

 

- Cutting open the bitten area.

 

- Application of potassium permanganate.

 

- Use of electroshock therapy. (Although still advocated by some, animal testing has shown this treatment to be useless and potentially dangerous (cf Postgrad Med, 1987a, Postgrad Med, 1987b, Ann Emerg Med, 1988, Toxicon, 1987, Ann Emerg Med, 1991)).

 

- Suctioning out venom, either by mouth or with a pump. Suctioning by pump removes a clinically insignificant quantity of venom (Annals of Emergency Medicine, February 2004), and the resultant bruising speeds the venom's absorption. Suctioning by mouth presents a risk of further poisoning through the mouth's mucous tissues (Riggs, et al 1987). The well-meaning family member or friend may also release bacteria into the victim’s wound, leading to infection.

 

- Application of ice. The process of chilling the wound area or the affected limb should certainly be avoided. This procedure would have the effect of slowing the blood flow to the area, thus preventing the natural dissipation of the venom and likely increasing its damaging effects.

 

In extreme cases, where the victims were in remote areas, all of these misguided attempts at treatment have resulted in injuries far worse than an otherwise mild to moderate snakebite. In worst case scenarios, thoroughly constricting tourniquets have been applied to bitten limbs, thus completely shutting off blood flow to the area. By the time the victims finally reached appropriate medical facilities their limbs had to be amputated.

 

WHAT TO DO:

 

Snakebite first aid recommendations vary, in part because different snakes have different types of venom. Some have little local effect, but life-threatening systemic effects, in which case containing the venom in the region of the bite (e.g., by pressure immobilization) is highly desirable. Other venoms instigate localized tissue damage around the bitten area, and immobilization may increase the severity of the damage in this area, but also reduce the total area affected; whether this trade-off is desirable remains a point of controversy.

 

Because snakes vary from one country to another, first aid methods also vary; treatment methods suited for rattlesnake bite in the United States might well be fatal if applied to a tiger snake bite in Australia. As always, this article is not a legitimate substitute for professional medical advice. Readers are strongly advised to obtain guidelines from a reputable first aid organization in their own region, and to beware of homegrown or anecdotal remedies. However, most first aid guidelines agree on the following:

 

- Protect the patient (and others, including yourself) from further bites. While identifying the species is desirable, do not risk further bites or delay proper medical treatment by attempting to capture or kill the snake. If the snake has not already fled, carefully remove the patient from the immediate area.

 

- Keep the patient calm and call for help to arrange for transport to the nearest hospital emergency room, where antivenom for snakes common to the area will often be available.

 

-Make sure to keep the bitten limb in a functional position and below the victim's heart level so as to minimize blood returning to the heart and other organs of the body.

 

-Do not give the patient anything to eat or drink. This is especially important with consumable alcohol, a known vasodilator which will speedup the absorption of venom. Do not administer stimulants or pain medications to the victim, unless specifically directed to do so by a physician.

 

- Remove any items or clothing which may constrict the bitten limb if it swells (rings, bracelets, watches, footwear, etc.)

 

- Keep the patient as still as possible, to not raise heart rate by exertion.

 

- Many organizations, including the American Medical Association and American Red Cross, recommend washing the bite with soap and water. However, do not attempt to clean the area with any type of alcohol or other chemical.

 

- Pressure immobilization may not be appropriate for cytotoxic bites such as those of most vipers, but is highly effective against neurotoxic venoms such as those of most elapids.  the object of pressure immobilization is to contain venom within a bitten limb and prevent it from moving through the lymphatic system to the vital organs in the body core. This therapy has two components: pressure to prevent lymphatic drainage, and immobilization of the bitten limb to prevent the pumping action of the skeletal muscles. Pressure is preferably applied with an elastic bandage, but any cloth will do in an emergency. Bandaging begins two to four inches above the bite (i.e. between the bite and the heart), winding around in overlapping turns and moving up towards the heart, then back down over the bite and past it towards the hand or foot. Then the limb must be held immobile: not used, and if possible held with a splint or sling. The bandage should be about as tight as when strapping a sprained ankle. It must not cut off blood flow, or even be uncomfortable; if it is uncomfortable, the patient will unconsciously flex the limb, defeating the immobilization portion of the therapy. The location of the bite should be clearly marked on the outside of the bandages. Some peripheral edema is an expected consequence of this process.

 

Apply pressure immobilization as quickly as possible; if you wait until symptoms become noticeable you will have missed the best time for treatment. Once a pressure bandage has been applied, it should not be removed until the patient has reached a medical professional. The combination of pressure and immobilization can contain venom so effectively that no symptoms are visible for more than twenty-four hours, giving the illusion of a dry bite. But this is only a delay; removing the bandage releases that venom into the patient's system with rapid and possibly fatal consequences.

 

Information sourced from:  http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Snakebite_(bite)

[glow=red,2,300]*as always - do your own homework; its our individual responsibiliity and duty to verify, authenticate, and vet all information related to health and emergencies.[/glow]

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Guest taken by the wind...

~ I researched the snake bite thing a while, and I've found that there's just as much misleading info out there as there is for anything. So I just stuck to Medical E.R. sites, even Pub. MED. articles. I even talked to my friends husband who is an E.R. Doctor.  Here's what I found out:

 

The way you treat the bite, depends on what bit you. In the U.S. we have Pit Vipers and Elapids.

 

Pit Vipers are the Water Moccasins, Copperheads, and 15 species of Rattlesnakes.

 

One important thing to remember is that most adults don't die from Pt Viper snake bites. A lot of times, these Pit Vipers don't even inject venom with a bite... or the amount of venom that they do inject is minimal, depending on a lot of factors. Extremities are usually the site of the bite. children or people who get bit in a central trunk area are in more danger. Use this info to calm the person down, who has been bitten. Most people who are bit by venomous snakes in this country, are bit by Pit Vipers.

 

Most Emergency Rooms highly recommend using a Sawyer Extractor... (for Pit Viper bites and insect bites) It can extract up to 30% of the protein from the venom, IF used within three minutes. For insect bites they are very good too.

 

extractorboxxe7.jpg

 

The Venom is designed to immobilize, and digest it's prey. It is highly necrotic... (that means it just dissolves the tissue and causes it to die.) THAT's why they don't recommend tourniquets anymore for Pit Viper bites. OR Ice... anything that localizes the venom, and keeps in in that area is NOT good when you've been bitten by a Pit Viper. It can worsen the tissue damage.

 

For Pit Viper bites:

 

 

 

There is no question that a Crotalid envenomation is a medical emergency requiring urgent evacuation if possible. However, the first step in treatment is to avoid panic. Death is rare; even without evacuation, most cases result in several days of serious misery and then full recovery. Remember that the fatality rate even for untreated pit viper bites is extremely low. The treatment steps are:

 

Use the Sawyer Extractor. If you are in snake country, the Extractor should always be within easy reach in your pack. The Extractor can remove as much as 30% of Crotalid venom proteins if applied within three minutes. Use the Extractor as quickly as possible.

 

Immobilize the bitten extremity with a splint, just as you would a fracture.

 

Have the patient rest and keep activity to a minimum.

-

Have the patient drink as much fluid as possible, in frequent small amounts, in order to maintain fluid volume and kidney flow.

 

Remember that a snakebite is a contaminated puncture wound, and treat it as such.

 

Get to definitive care as quickly as you can, if at all possible. Otherwise, have the patient rest and drink fluids; keep the wound clean; give lots of encouragement and support.

The following are not recommended for pit viper envenomations:

 

Do not make incisions or try to suck out the venom. In wilderness conditions, cutting into an already compromised limb is asking for an infection. You absolutely do not want pit viper venom in your mouth. Conversely, your mouth is full of all kinds of bacteria. And you can't suck as hard as the Extractor can anyway.

 

Do not use a tourniquet. Tourniquets can result in loss of the limb due to decreased blood flow. In addition, you are just keeping the venom localized where it does the most tissue damage.

 

Do not use electric shock. It can be dangerous, and has no proven value in managing pit viper bites. It is the great urban legend of wilderness first aid.

 

Do not use ice. There is no evidence that snake venom enzyme activity diminishes with cold. Freezing already compromised tissue can lead to frostbite, which can damage the limb more than the original bite. Packing in ice has probably resulted in more lost limbs than snakebite itself; this is particularly tragic when limbs have been lost to frostbite because of a non-envenomated bite.

 

Do not give alcohol. It causes vessels to dilate and may speed venom absorption.

 

All of this advice is in agreement with all medical articles I read.

 

 

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Thanks Taken a very informative post that underlines best practice thank you for taking the time to post it up.

 

There are a lot of myths and crackpot ideas on this subject and the real advice is often lost in it. The advice i gave above is UK first aid protocole but as i said we only have one venomous snake here in the UK which is the adder a member of the viper family.

 

 

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Guest taken by the wind...

~ That brings us to the Other kind of snake in the U.S.

The Elapidae or coral snakes. Coral snakes are related to cobras and several types of Australian venomous snakes.

 

Coral snakes have very short fangs in the front of a small mouth. The small mouth and fangs make it hard for a coral snake to bite anything other than a finger, toe, or fold of skin. Pit vipers strike and release, but coral snakes hang on and chew. And while Crotalid venom causes rapid tissue necrosis, Elapid venom slowly attacks the central nervous system. These differences mean that you treat a coral snake bite differently than you would a pit viper bite. In particular, for Elapid envenomation,

 

the use of a Sawyer Extractor appears to be of little benefit if a Coral Snake bites you.

 

Elapid venom is a systemic neurotoxin,

 

wrap the entire bitten extremity. This can help delay systemic absorption of the venom, but, unlike Crotalid venom, will not cause local tissue necrosis.

North American coral snakes are generally shy and docile, and they do not attack unless deliberately provoked. Fewer than forty percent of Elapid bites result in significant envenomation. Fatalities are rare.

 

When someone is bitten, the extremity starts to become weak and numb after about an hour. In the following hours, the signs and symptoms of central nervous system poisoning begin to appear – nausea, vomiting, weakness, muscle twitching, tingling in the extremities, slurred speech, increased salivation, and difficulty swallowing and breathing. In the worst case, depression of the central nervous system can lead to respiratory and cardiac paralysis and death.

 

A significant problem is that it is often hard to know whether the person bitten has been envenomated or not. The fang marks can be hard to see, although sometimes you can squeeze blood from the tiny puncture sites. Local swelling is usually minimal. There are often many nonvenomous mimics of coral snakes in the same area, so it can be difficult to know whether the biting snake was venomous or not. It can take more than an hour for the bitten extremity to feel weak or numb, and sometimes as long as twelve hours before the victim feels sick enough to need help.

 

So, if someone has been bitten by something that may have been a coral snake, it is important to begin treatment and observation right away, and to give serious consideration to evacuation, even in the absence of signs and symptoms, and even if you might feel foolish later if nothing happens. Treatment for Elapid envenomation in the wilderness is as follows:

 

Keep the patient calm and with as little movement as possible. Provide lots of support and encouragement.

 

Clean and flush the wound with clean water and apply a sterile dressing.

 

Wrap the bitten limb with an elastic bandage at about the same tension as would be used on a sprained ankle. Start wrapping about four inches above the bite and wrap away from the body toward the hand or foot. If you have an additional elastic bandage, you can then wrap in the other direction, starting about four inches below the bite and wrapping toward the body. This should help to immobilize the venom. The wrapping should be loose enough so that you can slip a finger underneath, and you should check the peripheral pulses to make sure there is no constriction of blood flow. Remember that the venom spreads through the lymphatic system, which lies close to the surface of the skin, so that great pressure is not necessary in order to constrict its flow.

 

Splint the limb and keep it at about heart level.

 

Encourage the patient to drink frequent small amounts of water.

 

Provide basic life support and treat for shock as necessary.

 

Transport as quickly as possible to definitive medical care, where antivenom and appropriate facilities for its administration may be available.

 

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Guest taken by the wind...

~ NOTE..... I had actually never heard of the "Sawyer Extractor" but it is actually sited in several Emergency medicine articles as the only snake bite (insect sting) kit worth a flip....    ANYTHING with a razor in it should be tossed.  So I Googled the Sawyer Extractor. It looks like a simple syringe capable of producing powerful suction...   Some Doctors have said that anyone in snake country needs to carry one of these things. I have never seen one, or ever had to use one. Does anyone out there have one? Just curious.  :unsure:

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I dont and they are hard to come by in the UK but i will have to order one from the US one day, unless someone would like to give me one for Xmas  :thumbup:

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Guest taken by the wind...

~ I"m gonna find out what it is... if its' just a large syringe with a wide base... I'll send everyone one! LOL!  :thumbup:

 

here's another pic I found... 

 

untitledcv2.png

 

Seriously, It just looks like a 35cc syringy with an adaptor on the end.... I mean, what else COULD it be? I'll configure one at work tomorrow. And market it to y'all at a discount! LOL!  (Just postage and handling.)  :thumbsup:

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Guest HazeyWolf

The Sawyer Kit also claims to be  effective with insect bites if used promptly,  and reportedly can remove up to 35% of injected snake bite venom (if treatment is started within three minutes), without causing further injury or trauma. The Extractor uses a venom pump suction device, akin to a syringe but it creates suction when the plunger is depressed, with various form fitting adapters to create a *very strong* vacuum, sucking the venom out through the original punctures over a period of at least thirty minutes of treatment.

 

I saw a Science program in which they demonstrated the ineffectiveness of the Sawyer using real snakes and dead pigs... I can't find the video or information on the show anywhere!  I'll keep looking... Unfortunately, Sawyer does not provide any scientific evidence for their snake-bite kit's effectiveness claims: http://www.sawyeronline.com/

However some scientfic/medical papers have been published that declare the Sawyer pump ineffective: "Suction for venomous snakebite A study of “mock venom” extraction in a human model."  Annals of Emergency Medicine, Volume 43, Issue 2, Pages 181-186, M. Alberts concludes; "The Sawyer Extractor pump removed bloody fluid from our simulated snakebite wounds but removed virtually no mock venom, which suggests that suction is unlikely to be an effective treatment for reducing the total body venom burden after a venomous snakebite."

 

1. http://www.sciencedirect.com/science?_ob=ArticleURL&_udi=B6WB0-4BGH766-M&_user=10&_coverDate=02%2F29%2F2004&_rdoc=1&_fmt=&_orig=search&_sort=d&view=c&_acct=C000050221&_version=1&_urlVersion=0&_userid=10&md5=5056b65943bd717615bb6786d328be58

 

2. http://www.annemergmed.com/article/PIIS0196064403008138/abstract

 

Its just one study though, and it has inpsired debate among medical authorities.  As the Sawyer doesn't damage the envenomation site but cutting it with a razor, I for one would give it a try...the study doesn't claim that any additional harm was done with the Sawyer, and it didn't provide test results against insect or spider bites either... The deivice is small enough to suggest that it may make a good addition to a personal medical kit.

 

I wear cordora gaiters in some areas where there are rattlesnakes in abundance.  http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gaiters 

The fatality rate for venomous snake bites in the US is extremely low (most estimates I recall are way under 1%), so it is unlikely you will die even if bitten in a remote area. Many bites do not even require antivenom treatment.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Guest taken by the wind...

~ NOBODY RECOMMENDS CUTTING THE SITE!  The Sawyer kit is just a syringe that you place over the fang marks! I never advocated cutting the bite wound....  that's pretty much a NO NO!  I'm sure it's a sterile kit. I doubt it can damage the nerve endings anymore than getting a hicky could... LOL! either way, Hazey.... It makes sense to my mediical mind (and I'm all about some common sense) that if something injects some venom in you... and that venom is GOING to do it's damage no matter what you do..... even if you get to a hospital... Rattlesnake venom is going to do tissue damage.... THAT's A GIVEN.  It will necrose your tissues. That means it rots the tissues that absorb it....

 

My personal opinion (and it is only an opinion) is that if I can even get a molecule of that crap out of the puncture wound... by using a syringe, I'm gonna try to do it.)  I can't imagine how it could hurt anything. Unless I applied suction for so long that I impeded blood flow to the wound.....   I'm not gonna do that. If it sucks out scorpion venom... or spider venom... hell, it might just as well suck out some rattlesnake venom too. And maybe I won't loose my finger or hand... who knows?  Apparently Nobody knows the perfect strategy. It's like that in Medicine. So we rely a LOT on intuition.

 

We do stuff every single day in critical care that may not be FDA approved yet... but ya know what? What's the alternative? That's what one needs to ask themselves. Rattlesnake venom will absolutely necrose the tissure that it settles in. Antivenom doesn't cure that. There is a short window of opportunity for getting "some" of it out, before it is absorbed and distributed by the lypmphatic system into the surrounding tissues...  I'm gonna do what I can to get some of it out. It IS proven that the amount of venom injected plays a HUGE role in the damage done... so I figure why not help out my odds? 

 

:P :whistle:  (that's just how I think though) .....  I don't wait for some expert to tell me exactly WHAT to do. I just review the facts and make up my own mind. (I've learned in my work that those experts change their direction as often as a hurricane does)

 

Please site your authorities on how the extraction kit is not recommended. Because many sites I looked up did reccomend it (for pit viper bites ONLY).

 

If used fast... it makes sense that you might could suck some of that nasty venom out of the puncture wounds... (when I give a shot... I see stuff oozing out of the shot wound) It just makes sense that if I applied suction to that site very quickly... I might extract some of that injection material... It's not absorbed immediately by the body.....   

 

8|   AM I nuts here???

 

If you don't use "ANYTHING" then you've still got to go to the hospital and go through the same ordeal.... usually they just observe you. They don't automatically give you antivenom... they wait to see how bad the bite is... HOW MUCH VENOM was injectied! THAT's what they wait for. Why not help that out a bit...?  :whistle:

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