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Seth

Where can I go?

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I wanted to take a month-long journey on foot this summer through the wilderness of northwestern Canada, living off of whatever I could kill or forage. Unfortunately I have to postpone. I have three weeks this winter to myself, and I'd like to take a similar trip at that time. Can anyone recommend good wilderness areas in the southern hemisphere where one can wander and take down game for food? It only need be a country where I can buy a rifle (i.e. Australia is out). Other than that, issues of legality are of little concern. I would just take the original trip to northern Canada, but I know from my time in the military just how miserable it is to be cold.

 

Thanks to anyone who can provide suggestions.

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Guest taken by the wind...

~ Why can't you buy a Rifle and take it with you?  :unsure: I thought hunters do that all the time.

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First welcome aboard Seth. :wave:

 

The western desert area is good in the winter and very challanging.South Dakota in early or late winter maybe. Theres lots of places in the souther US.

 

I like the marlin 70 pss survival rifle 22 cal. 7 or 10 round clip. Plastic stock stainless light and dependable.

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Thanks for the suggestions guys. I know there are lots of great places in the US, and I may end up doing just that. I recently read in the New York Times that Idaho has a huge, nearly unknown wilderness area that may be just right.

 

However, I was wondering about countries south of the Equator, because if I went during December/January (when I have time off) it would be summer, meaning I could travel a lot lighter.

 

Taken, to answer your question: If I chose someplace like Australia, I couldn't just buy a rifle and take it with me because it is difficult or impossible to transport firearms internationally, or on planes.

 

Thanks again.

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Guest taken by the wind...

~ Oh... my brother works for DELTA. I thought that as long as a firearm was declared, and unloaded, and checked (not carry-on)  in a crush-proof case, that most airlines didn't have a problem transporting them. I may be wrong. I know some guys who went back and forth to Iraq. They all carried their weapons with them in this manner. They had more delays than the average person, but they still were able to do it. Sometimes their luggage arrived on another flight! LOL!  :whistle:

 

I can't imagine Hunters having to buy a brand new rifle everytime they go on a hunting expedition somewhere.  :unsure:

 

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Guest adrenjunky

Taken-Problem is alot of countries bringing them in is illegal or extremely hard.

 

Try New Zealand, they have a couple of big companies that do walk-abouts.

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Guest taken by the wind...

~ Oh... thanks A.J.  I don't know anyone who hunts stuff not in our own country. I know guys who go to Alaska and stuff.   :thumbup: I imagine everyone's pretty paranoid nowadays anyway.  :yes: It probably is pretty hard.

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~ Oh... thanks A.J.  I don't know anyone who hunts stuff not in our own country. I know guys who go to Alaska and stuff.   :thumbup: I imagine everyone's pretty paranoid nowadays anyway.  :yes: It probably is pretty hard.

Well see there she can be nice when she wants to. :D

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Guest adrenjunky

~ Oh... thanks A.J.  I don't know anyone who hunts stuff not in our own country. I know guys who go to Alaska and stuff.   :thumbup: I imagine everyone's pretty paranoid nowadays anyway.  :yes: It probably is pretty hard.

I don't know anyone either, I just read about all the rich people that do :blush:. Like the surgeons at the here at the U. Why didn't I stay in school alot....lot longer  wacky078.gif

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Guest HazeyWolf

Hey Seth, sounds like a fantastic journey may be in store for you.  I've treked a bit in Central America and Mexico, but haven't made it to South America yet.  First off - how's your Espanol?  Have you ever spent time in another culture?  Its another world, amigo. A beautiful one, full of beautiful people and traditions, and endless challenges and experiences.  Plenty of other wanderers, travelers, and free-wheelin' survivors out there too --they're on a different track - hard to discern at first but when you get the scent its a heck of a ride. When you get in the groove, the world opens up... you're lost and broke one mintute, and have new friends that feed you, care for you, and share their lives with you the next.  It really is a small, connected world, but its vast and deep too. Your thought about living off the land south of the border is a very serious departure from the norm.  Have you done anything like this before?  You need to have an emergency back-up plan man, just in case.  Sat phone, PLB, money, contacts, the works.  Its do-able though.  Harder than you might ever imagine, but do-able.

 

I don't know much about the gun-laws and hunting resrictions, but when you land in the right place in the boonies, chances are it won't matter much, though there are lots of protected species and areas you might end up in.  If you don't mind shellin' out some dinero, you could probably squat and forage for a few months in the bush on Gringo owned property. You might do a search on large acreages up for sale, and offer to pay a chance to camp.

 

Most countries take hunting seriously, and its regulated for foreigners - there are plenty of hunting clubs and seasonal game to go after. But you don't always need to hunt with a gun.  In Costa Rica I ran into a guy named Stephan Brooks.  He inherited some dough from Grandma, headed to Costa Rica, bought 30 or so acres and lived off the land for a year!  He's a remarkable guy and an inspiration - since then he's become a bit of a local celebrity - started his own organic farm/resort - teaches sustainable living through permaculture, is a health guru and amateur enthobotanist.  He and his staff might be able to help you out. Stephen Brooks  He and his wife now run the Punta Mona Center for Sustainable Living and Education.  Punta Mona  I met him  just after his time alone in the jungle, but before he started his buisness - so I don't know what its like, but if you can reach him, and connect with him on a spiritual level, he might be able to point you in the right direction.

 

Along that line, there are lots of wierd places to live down there - mango farms, bannana plantations, coffee country... but walking into the forest without having a clue is pretty nuts. Its a jungle down there!  It'll beat the joy out of you pronto.  The heat and humidity alone will do that.  There's plenty to live on in some areas, if you know what's what - but if you don't you're the food.  I'm not a jungle survivor expert or anything like it... you could shack up in the hills around Lake Atitlan and live like a king on plaintain, mangos, papaya, and corn... The land and people are incredibly beautiful, and ineffably scarred. Its highly poplulated though, but there are plenty of hippies and back to the land folks there along with artists and farmers.  A little money goes a long way.

 

If you wanna go further south - into S. America, you might try contacting Sparrow (Johnathon Miller).  He's an ethnobotanist and Shaman who started a retreat dedicated to preserving the traditions and knowledge of the Osanimi people of Ecuador - though he works out of Costa Rica now - he has retreats to Ecador a few times a year in the Secoya AmazoniaTerritory. The Osanimi

 

Sparrow might be able to set you up in a good spot where you can live or learn.  He's a heavy dude and can see right through you. Worth the visit. He's a healer.  You might end up on a different journey than you've planned, but that's  the way life is anyway.  You only live once (or a few bazillion times at most)... Guaria de Osa Costa Rica

 

There are  great treker/guides everywhere- hundreds of them - they don't always cost much and are often just good ol' boys livin' where they were born an raised.  I met a few along the Mosquito Coast (read Paul Theroux?) - that land is fricken serious - get a guide.  You can live in a hammock or shack for peanuts but don't wander off into the bush without knowing something.  I hung there with a guide named Arturo Martinez  - he did a stint with the USMC.  He's probably dead now but there are others like him aplenty - you just gotta ask around with the hunting/fishing/birding/etomology/herpatoligist/mayan archeology/anthro/geologist crowd...

 

You could also talk to the legendary Aboman - Mr.Joe Bigley, noted survival skills author and  caste member of a Ron Hood video or two and owner of the Salmon River Outdoor Survival school in ID. Abotech  I don't know the details but I think he might be involved with a surval training gig in Belize where they use American dollars, speak more Anglish and its easier to get to... Plus if you call it quits you can head to the coast and be a beach bum with all the yuppie boating crowd to mooch from...

 

And also, the man himself, Mr. Ron Hood - who spent some time traveling in South America as presented in his Telly Award Winning video on Jungle Survival Skills: Ron Hood's Jungle Survival Skills  He might be able to put you into contact with someone who can set you up.

 

There are a few other training outfits I've not had any involvment with but have good reputations... It may not be the kind of experience you're looking for but they too might be able to help a little or give you the ride of your life...

 

Randall's Adventure Training (the RAT school): RAT Jungle Training

 

and the SpecOps School: SpecOps 

 

There have been a few conversations about such topic on the Hoolum's site and a few others so do a little searching and you might dig up something that suits you  Survival.com   ... I ran into a lot of Cannuck's when I was south of the border in the winter months - I'm sure there's a whole world of Southeast Asian and Polynesian gigs that would fit the bill for you as well...Borneo Survial Blog

 

 

 

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Wow, HazeyWolf, that's really a lot of great information. To answer your questions, yes, I'm fluent in Spanish, and I've traveled throughout the world. I'm no survival expert but I have special military training that has introduced me firsthand to hunger, thirst, exposure, mental dispair, and other things that kill in the wild.

 

Taken, you're exactly right about the regulations concerning transporting firearms. When I went to Iraq it was on a commercial flight and I held my M16 in my lap (the bolt they asked me to place in my pocket). However, there were only soldiers aboard and that was a special circumstance, to be sure.

 

I guess the single most relevant information I could ask for, besides what you guys have already given me, is this: Into what countries may foreigners bring hunting rifles? Alternatively, in what countries may foreigners purchase firearms without doing a prohibitive amount of paperwork?

 

This information is surprisingly hard to come by, so thanks a million.

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Guest adrenjunky

One of your first steps should be to pick where you want to go. I can give you a couple of places here and there or hook you up to someone once you know. It is usually easier to bring guns in than buy there. They figure if you are bringing it in than you are ok. What do you want to hunt for? Why do you want to go out of the country? What have you hunted in the states?

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