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Hypothetical: Which gun would you choose (inspired by "Survivorman").


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On last night's "Survivorman", Les had to survive 7 days in the Amazon river basin jungle, with only a spear for protection against jaguars, etc. He actually saw and was followed by a jag at the end of his 7 days.

 

Les was unarmed (except for the spear and his Leatherman Surge), but I wouldn't be, and I bet you wouldn't be, either. With that in mind, I've prepared a list of weapons, from which you can choose one for your very own 7 day Amazon jungle survival experience. Use it for protection, food gathering, etc.

 

Choose well.

 

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A pistol wouldnt be my first choice but it would deffinately have to be a stainless.You might as well go for open sights I think a scope would fog over just when you needed it.

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My choice in that terrain would be a wakizashi sword. One, it'd make a great machete (as long as you were diligent with keeping an edge), and two, when it comes to cougars, pumas, jaguars, you won't know they're out there till they're on top of you. I wouldn't want to be fumbling for my gun in it's holster while that thing is clawing my face off, I'd rather have my weapon of choice in my hand, at the ready, at all time. Your natural reaction to an attack is your hands thrust out in front of you, imagine the sword already in position for a neck thrust, even while your laying on your back fighting it off, you'd have perfect access to the weak point on the cat's rib cage where the neck vertebrae poke through. You'd just need a hefty thrust and you'd cut two of the largest arteries the cat has including trachea and esophogus with a little twist. Take two fingers and place them, pointed, just below your adam's apple and rested on your rib cage, you'll feel a little void there, give a little pressure with your pointed fingers, you'll see what I'm talking about. Vulnerable.

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rockhounder, you've trained with a sword "wakizashi"  :thumbup:

i would like the chisa katana from cold steel, maybe next year  :thumbsup:

 

I trained with a kendo master for two years while I was stationed in Japan. I wouldn't consider myself an expert by any means, but I'm comfortable with a katana or wakizashi without fear of cutting my own self. Cold Steel makes some good modern steel replicas.

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2 friends of mine set up electronic timers and video cameras and "faced off" per say one with an self loading pistol and he other with a Nihon-to (Japanese sword) and on signal cut or shot their target. The Sword was able to cut the target (a straw bundle) 9/10 time before the shot was off and on target. We didn't believe it, our instructor from Japan even veryfied the results. The shootist is an A class IPSC and steel challenge shooter, the swordman is a kendo and iaito student.

So rockhounder is right with training a blade is a good choice.

But I would still carry the S&W .44 

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2 friends of mine set up electronic timers and video cameras and "faced off" per say one with an self loading pistol and he other with a Nihon-to (Japanese sword) and on signal cut or shot their target. The Sword was able to cut the target (a straw bundle) 9/10 time before the shot was off and on target. We didn't believe it, our instructor from Japan even veryfied the results. The shootist is an A class IPSC and steel challenge shooter, the swordman is a kendo and iaito student.

So rockhounder is right with training a blade is a good choice.

But I would still carry the S&W .44 

 

FH...It's all about what you're comfortable with, there's no RIGHT choice. If you feel you're safe, then that is what matters. The "confindent" feeling while being out alone is what is paramount, knowing that you're the baddest mutha effer out in the bush is more effective than wanting to survive.

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RH..

FH...It's all about what you're comfortable with, there's no RIGHT choice. If you feel you're safe, then that is what matters. The "confindent" feeling while being out alone is what is paramount, knowing that you're the baddest mutha effer out in the bush is more effective than wanting to survive.

 

Hmmm... BigCat verses me and my comfortable ego.... :P

 

I am very comfortable with my skills and very very confindent in my abilities, but I seriously doubt those would hold up well taking on a big cat. Granted you should feel comfortable with whatever form of gear you have, but confindence and skill will only carry you so far.

 

I dont really have a strong preference to which firearm I would want, not that I have anything against them, I just never carry one. But I am most use to a M1911 .45, Or the M1911A1 to be exact, so that is what I would want.

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Guest adrenjunky

I would go with the FN, the the 1911, I hate glocks (don't have a real reason) so I would then go with the 44mag.

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I would go with the FN, the the 1911, I hate glocks (don't have a real reason) so I would then go with the 44mag.

 

AJ, I like glocks but the bad thing about them, is that they don't have a firing pin safety device. They have a trigger safety, but they don't have a "hammer blocking" safety like any other semi-auto. I won't ever have one chambered in my house because it isn't safe. You can have a colt 1911 chambered, but if the hammer safety is on "safe" you can pull the trigger all you want and it won't fire, the glock on the other hand has no such safety prevention device. That's a good reason not to like them.

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i love glocks there teh future handgun but i like 1911

 

but i would love a m4, or a bar, or a m60, or a 50 cal sniper  :guns:

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I have the stainless Papoose Marlin 70PSS with a red dot sight scope.>

 

survivalriflemarlinkg5.jpg

 

 

Now I see Henry has a new survival rifle. I have a Henrey 22 mag. lever action and I love that gun so I just gotta own the Henry survival rifle>

 

survivallargert9.jpg

 

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The Marlin doesnt it breaks down and has a carring case. Im not sure about the Henry I just found it and I havent checked it out yet.

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Your right I just checked

 

Henry Repeating Arms has tooled up to manufacture a new and improved version of the famous U.S. Air Force AR-7, now known as the Henry U.S. Survival rifle. This compact and lightweight sportsman’s rifle is ideal for all outdoorsmen, including campers, backpackers, hunters, fishermen, boat owners and target shooters. And it can still serve its original purpose as a survival rifle for pilots.

 

The Henry U.S. Survival rifle is ultra-lightweight, weighing in at a scant 2.5 pounds. The unique design allows the rifle to break down easily into three pieces in seconds. This enables the barrel, action and two 8-round magazines to fit comfortably into the tough ABS synthetic waterproof stock. No tools are needed to assemble or disassemble. Once disassembled and stowed, it is only an incredible 16 inches long. Carry it in your backpack with room to spare.

 

To assemble, simply attach the receiver to the stock, insert the barrel, screw on the barrel nut and you’re ready to fire. In seconds, you’ll have the security of a semi-automatic rifle without the bulk and weight of a full size firearm.

 

The Henry U.S. Survival rifle features a steel barrel that is covered in a tough ABS plastic and then coated in Teflon. This unique barrel design allows the gun to balance properly and remain lightweight, yet withstand tens of thousands of rounds. The entire receiver is also coated in Teflon, making the Henry U.S. Survival rifle the most weather-resistant of any AR-7 ever made. As an added feature, the receiver rib is now grooved for easy installation of a scope.

 

The rifle is capable of feeding both standard and high velocity .22 Long Rifle ammunition. Available in black, silver or camouflage finishes.

 

Specifications:

 

Models: H002S - Silver

H002B - Black

H002C - Camo

Action Type: Semi-automatic

Caliber: .22 LR

Capacity: 8 rounds

Length: 35" overall, 16 1/2" stowed

Weight: 2.5 lbs.

Stock: ABS Plastic

Sights: Adjustable rear Blade front

Finish: Teflon coated receiver and coated steel barrel

 

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Guest adrenjunky

AJ, I like glocks but the bad thing about them, is that they don't have a firing pin safety device. They have a trigger safety, but they don't have a "hammer blocking" safety like any other semi-auto. I won't ever have one chambered in my house because it isn't safe. You can have a colt 1911 chambered, but if the hammer safety is on "safe" you can pull the trigger all you want and it won't fire, the glock on the other hand has no such safety prevention device. That's a good reason not to like them.

Glocks are great have alot of friends that carry them in service and conceled. I just don't like the way they fit in my hand, and they don't fit my eye when I bring them up. I really like the XDs but as yourself, I still like a positive safety. So to me the 1911 will stay by my side for a long time.

 

The reason I picked the the FN is because of the extra distance. Not as good as a rifle, better then a standard handgun. 100yrds or so

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Here's some more info for you, SK:

 

I think most everyone here knows that my daily carry gun is a 1991A1 Compact (Colt Officer's) .45ACP.  I have (and have owned) several 1911/1911A1 pistols.  I also have extensive experience with Glock pistols, having owned 9mm, .357 Sig, .40 S&W, and .45 ACP versions.  As far as safety goes, my Colt has 3:  Manual safety, grip safety, and firing pin safety.  I carry the pistol 'cocked and locked.' (for non-aficianados, that means hammer cocked, manual safety on).  I've carried this particular gun in this way since 1993.  I am completely, absolutely confident about the safety of this carry mode.  I have never personally known another 1911-toter to have an accidental discharge. I'm sure it's happened to someone, but not anyone I know.

 

I have carried Glocks nearly as much as I have 1911's.  I bought my first Glock 17 in about 1988.  I think the main reason I don't carry the Glock nowadays is simply that the 1911 fits my hand better and points better for me.  As for safety, I do know one officer who had an accidental discharge with his Glock, right into his left hand!  Why?  He didn't have the gun in a holster covering the trigger guard.  He got out of his truck, juggling a handful of stuff, including a two-way radio.  The antenna of the radio got inside the trigger guard and BANG!  One shot officer!  The moral of the story:  Keep the Glock in a GOOD quality holster that COMPLETELY covers the trigger guard. 

 

As far as my personal comfort level with the Glock, I am fine with carrying one with a round in the chamber, I'm not concerned that I'll have an accidental discharge as long as I follow basic safety guidelines (finger off the trigger until you WANT it to go bang).  I don't have any personal experience with a Glock going off when dropped--I'm not dropping mine just to see!-- and I've never heard of it happening (anyone else hear of an incident?).  They are supposed to be designed to prevent a discharge when fired, but again, I don't plan on conducting my own tests.  With as many law enforcement officers carrying Glocks as there are, I'm sure somebody is dropping a gun now and then.

 

A double action revolver only has one safety:  the trigger.  Pull it and the gun goes bang.  A Glock has a lighter trigger (usually, unless you have one of those awful "New York" triggers) than a revolver's double action pull.  Most factory Glocks have about a 5.5 lb trigger pull, but it can vary.  Most factory revolvers have at least double that, 10 to 12 lbs.  The Glock's trigger pull is shorter than a double action revolver's.  The main reason I picked the .44 Mountain Gun is the caliber and the sights that come with it.  If I want a big cat down QUICK, the bigger round has its advantages.  If I see an opportunity for a meal out past 50 yards, the sights and that round give me an advantage.  I won't worry about over-penetration in the jungle, and the blast won't bother me with the threat of a jaguar close up and personal.  My ears might ring later after the adrenaline wears off!

 

Like Forlorn Hope said, it comes down to what you are comfortable with. 

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The GLOCK is the best overall semi auto handgun being made today.  To say that they are not safe is wrong.  A GLOCK will NOT fire unless the trigger is pulled -- period, paragraph.  They are also extraordinarily reliable right out of the box, are practically impervious to dirt and debris, do not require a lot of lube, won't rust, and have a consistent shot to shot trigger pull.

 

If your life is on the line, "lose that nickel plated sissy pistol and get yourself a GLOCK".

 

The most popular police handgun in the U.S. (by far) is the GLOCK 22 .40 caliber.

 

No, I don't work for GLOCK  :).

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Guest adrenjunky

What are you basing that on. Sig and H&K both have done better in testing than Glock, in the last round of mil testing. The Mark 23 has been on the top of tests for the last 10 years, however the cost is up there (2K).

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The GLOCK is the best overall semi auto handgun being made today.  To say that they are not safe is wrong.  A GLOCK will NOT fire unless the trigger is pulled -- period, paragraph.  They are also extraordinarily reliable right out of the box, are practically impervious to dirt and debris, do not require a lot of lube, won't rust, and have a consistent shot to shot trigger pull.

 

If your life is on the line, "lose that nickel plated sissy pistol and get yourself a GLOCK".

 

The most popular police handgun in the U.S. (by far) is the GLOCK 22 .40 caliber.

 

No, I don't work for GLOCK  :).

 

I don't disagree with you regarding the Glock safety, but pulling the trigger is the problem. I always have a chambered handgun in a fingertip lockbox under my bed. I have to kids in the house too, 8 and 9. I just feel more comfortable having a chambered handgun with a hammer safety device. You can drop a loaded glock of a 10 story building and it won't fire, but there is no safety that allows you to pull the trigger WITHOUT firing the weapon if it is chambered.

 

I'll agree, Glocks are good, but they aren't the best. I know my favorite. From here it's just a matter of opinion and not statistics.

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I base my opinion on experience.  Yes, it's just that -- opinion.  There are other great handguns out there.  I feel the best value overall is the Ruger P95 9mm -- absolute reliability for $325 new.  But my experience with GLOCKS have been 100 percent, and there are more GLOCKS in police and military service today than any other make of weapon.

 

You pays your money and you takes your choice.

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