Jump to content
WildSurvive Forum
rabbit

South Pacific episode

Recommended Posts

Bravo has missed out on one of life's true pleasures, biscuits and gravy!   :'(    Bravo, biscuits are either the bread of a meal, or with lots of jelly or jam (homemade preserves are even better) they can be a great dessert, too.

 

Did I miss something, or did Les get a brand new tatoo?  I swear I don't think he had it in the Labrador episode.  What is that?  A seal?   :huh:

I think it's a wolf howling.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Yeah I noticed that too... I was thinking - "how come I didn't notice that tattoo until now... weird..."  moose0024.gif

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Bravo,

 

-----Taken from Wikipedia's page on Biscuits-----

In American English, a "biscuit" is a small form of bread made with baking powder or baking soda as a leavening agent rather than yeast. (Biscuits, soda breads, and corn bread, among others, are sometimes referred to collectively as "quick breads" to indicate that they do not need time to rise before baking.)

 

Biscuits are extremely soft and similar to scones; in fact, many recipes are identical. In the United States, there is a growing tendency to refer to sweet variations as "scone" and to the savory as a "biscuit", though there are exceptions for both (such as the cheese scone). A sweet biscuit served with a topping of fruit and juice is called shortcake. In Canada, both sweet and savoury are referred to as "biscuits", "baking powder biscuits" or "tea biscuits", although "scone" is also starting to be used.

 

Biscuits are a common feature of Southern U.S. cuisine and are often made with buttermilk. They are traditionally served as a side dish with a meal, especially in the morning. As a breakfast item they are often eaten with butter and a sweet condiment such as molasses, light sugarcane syrup, sorghum syrup, honey, or fruit jam or jelly. With other meals they are usually eaten with butter or gravy instead of sweet condiments. However, biscuits and gravy (biscuits covered in country gravy) are usually served for breakfast, sometimes as the main course.

 

A common variation on basic biscuits is "cheese biscuits", made by adding grated Cheddar or American cheese to the basic recipe.

 

Large drop biscuits, because of their size and rough exterior texture, are sometimes referred to as "cat head biscuits".

 

Biscuits are now ubiquitous throughout the U.S. and feature prominently in many fast food breakfast sandwiches. The biscuit sandwich burst onto the scene primarily through the Hardee's chain of restaurants as an answer to the McDonald's Egg McMuffin.[citation needed] Along with the traditional country ham, Hardee's added sausage, cheese, eggs, steak, and even chicken to the breakfast bread. Breakfast biscuits are much bigger than ham biscuits, most as big or bigger than a typical fast food hamburger. In addition, biscuits are commonly found as a side dish at fried chicken restaurants such as Kentucky Fried Chicken, Bojangles', Church's Chicken, and Popeyes Chicken & Biscuits.

------ ------

buttermilk-biscuit.jpg.c21b68f337afa9dcf525e7e9506c5ab8.jpg

Biscuit_and_Gravy.jpg.fecfb0a6233f8f92314a5e058c339bfa.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Baking Powder Biscuits

(from a 1933 Recipe)

Ingredients:

2 cups sifted flour

2 tsp. baking powder

4 tablespoons butter or shortening

1/2 tsp. salt

about 3/4 cup milk

Sift Flour once, measure, add baking powder and salt, and sift again. Cut in shortening or butter. (this is where I use my hands by rubbing the butter into the flour). Add milk gradually, stirring until soft dough is formed. Turn out on slightly floured board and lightly "knead" for 30 seconds, enough to shape. Roll 1/2 inch thick and cut with 2 inch floured biscuit cutter. Bake on ungreased sheet in a 400 degree oven for 12-15 minutes. Makes 12 biscuits. You can also make tiny tea biscuits that are only 1 1/2 inches wide with a small cutter or glass bottom. These are great served with tea, jam or honey. Makes 24.

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Thanks for the info... never ate one though :( never even seen one in real life lol

 

Bravo, what do you have that's similar?  Anything?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

that sounds really good... anybody ate a pheasant i think i have it was good.

 

No duck is the furthest I've went away from the grocery store

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

that sounds really good... anybody ate a pheasant i think i have it was good.

 

I have had pheasant many times.  That is something I hunt....when I get a chance.  It is good depending on how you cook it...

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now

×