Jump to content
WildSurvive Forum
Gandar

Our 8 Mile hike to Myakka State Park Primitive Campground Reserve

Recommended Posts

This weekend, my wife and I took an 8 mile hike in Myakka State Park. The park is amazing, they have miles and miles of the state park that is completely bordered off within untouched land and left untouched itself, they call this area the Primitive Campgrounds. This is where you come if you want to get away from everything and camp/survive/train as if there was no one around, because there is no one around.

 

Unfortunately, the map of the area is not detailed, there are no markers or trails leading directly to the bordered off campground and no rangers that knew the primitive campground areas were on shift that day (comforting, right?). Without this knowledge, we had to guess our way around and ended up hiking 4 miles of virtually uncharted nothingness without ever finding the sectioned off campground. Knowing we had to hike the 4 miles back out and not wanting push our limits, we decided to call it a day and gave up our search for the primitive campgrounds area.

 

But our day was not lost nor without adventure. We curved around one area of trail that ran near a small water filled gully. As we curved the trail we caught sight of a mother Wild Hog and two babes drinking from the gully. As soon as they smelled/heard us, the babies took off runnin' and the mother stood her ground, ready to charge if she thought we meant them harm and man did that give our hearts a jump. The mother hog had to weigh in at 350-400 lbs and when their guarding young, they are NASTY. We calmly stood our ground and she mock rushed once then left with her babies.

 

We saw a beautiful large otter (Kelley only saw it's tail unfortunately) in the gully as well. It sure was a slimy looking one, right out of the water.

 

We later found out that we turned off on a fork that lead into the heavy hiking trail and followed that through for some time. The trail was only marked by a small 6 inch by 6 inch orange square on the trees and spaced out about every 50-60 feet with no visible foot trail so following it was attention keeping on it's own.

 

We ended up seeing about 1/2 dozen + boars but none as big as that momma throughout the trail, they were just too skittish to catch on camera though and I was too busy paying attention to their movements/attitude to snap a shot.

 

We hiked in and out with our complete Bug Out Bags that we organized the night before (I'll soon make another thread about organizing your B.O.B's). We have 7 Day + B.O.B.'s (complete with grits as our staple food) that weigh in at 12.5 lbs and I added a 1/2 gallon Coleman water jug onto my back for the trip, it wasn't the most comfortable addition but boy did that ice water taste good.

 

We hiked 4 hours and 8 miles and only saw another person on the main trail once.

 

-----

 

Here's Kelley all prettied up for the hike, you'll notice she's sporting her WS shirt.

kelleydb3.jpg

 

 

Here's me, I am not sporting mine... I know, I know but I need a very light shirt to hike in.

bradbf9.jpg

 

 

Here's the trail about 1/2 mile into it. There's NOTHING around, just the way we like it.

trail1lz5.jpg

 

 

Here's the trail a little further, you’ll see the scenery change a few times as we go in and out of open ground.

trail2qi8.jpg

 

 

Here's the trail about a 1/2 mile further. You can't see any civilization ANYWHERE.

trail3qi6.jpg

 

 

This is the last pic we have of the trail. After here we were too "into the zone" finding our way though it as it got ALOT thicker.

trail4rf9.jpg

 

 

This is a black snake we saw along the trail. We call them Black Racers around here, their actually "Coluber constrictor".

blacksnakelh2.jpg

 

 

Here are some berries we saw. Can anyone I.D. these?

unknownberriesri2.jpg

 

 

Here is a really cool looking mushroom (cool looking usually means deadly in plants as far as we've seen).

bluemushroomiy0.jpg

 

Here's another cool looking mushroom, it's pink.

pinkmushroompq6.jpg

 

 

Here's some fungus or moss on the ground. Can anyone I.D. this?

unkownfungisormosstq9.jpg

 

 

Here's the highlight of our hike (well one of them, the boars were cool too). We saw these deer grazing on our way back.

Can you find all 3?

deers1or6.jpg

 

 

Here's the same pic with the 3 deer circled.

deers2wa5.jpg

 

 

Hope you enjoyed seeing the beautiful things we saw.

Gandar (Brad) and Kelley

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

No offence Gandar but mother boar is a contradiction in terms . Boars are boys around here.  :P  Although I know what you mean. Wild hogs.

 

thanks for the pictures  you got different plants down there.  :o    :thumbup:

 

There are six primitive campgrounds at Myakka River. Each has three campsites and is set in an oak hammock or pinewoods, providing shade as well as beauty. A map of the hiking trails, dirt roads and primitive campsites can be picked up at the park office. Late fall, winter and early spring are the best times for hiking. Fees are $ 4.00 per person per night. 

Distances from the trailhead to the primitive campground 

Campground  Distance 

Mossy Hammock  2.2 miles. Accessible by hiking or biking. 

Bee Island  5.4 miles. Accessible by hiking or biking. 

Oak Grove  9.5 miles. Accessible by hiking or biking. 

Panther Point  8.6 miles. Accessible by by hiking only. 

Honore  8.7 miles. Accessible by hiking only. 

Prairie  13.9 miles. Accessible by hiking only. 

Water is available at all primitive camping areas. The water must be treated, filtered, or boiled prior to consumption. Wells may dry up when the water table is low. Check with a ranger for current conditions. 

To be safe, always carry water with you. The water pumps at the sites require priming. There are jugs of water by each pump for this purpose. Be sure to refill the jugs for the next camper. If you need instructions on operating pitcher pumps, ask a ranger. 

                     

Myakka River State Park is known the world over as a haven for abundant wildlife and natural scenic beauty. One of the best ways to experience this large wilderness area is through the solitude of a remote campsite, reachable only by hiking or biking. Staying overnight in one of the primitive areas provides campers with one of the best ways to see wildlife in a natural setting.

 

parkmapkz8.gif

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

No offence Gandar but mother boar is a contradiction in terms . Boars are boys around here. 

 

 

Hmmmm, we call em' all boars around here and the word's used as a synonym for hog. Fearing that you're right and we're just backwoods rednecks, I'll give it a change. It makes sense.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
parkmapkz8.gif

 

Yeah, that's the map you get and then another one for hiking.

 

The primitive campgrounds (the closer two that are less than 8 miles out) are in the area to the right that says  "See Hike/Bike Map".

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Gandar, what an amazing day!  I really enjoyed your narrative and the pics are wonderful!

 

Do you have "nutria" down there?  They look like giant rats weighing about 12 lbs and live in swamps and bayous.

 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Do you have "nutria" down there?  They look like giant rats weighing about 12 lbs and live in swamps and bayous.

 

 

Yeah we have a couple of these ugly buggers in there.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Guest taken by the wind...

~ Wow! Awsome adventure Gandar! Thanks for the pics!  :thumbsup:

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

wow...this is a trp i'd love to take...great stuff. did you practice any survival techniques ?

 

Yeah Nazgul, we made a fire using a magnesium stick and practiced looking for edible vegetation.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I just bought a new mag/flint stick (my fourth..) yesterday.

 

Cool, the wife and I recently bought our first swedish fire stick and man is it AWESOME.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

YA sure the Swedish fire steels are the best. Ive started fires with just the sparks into the tinder.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

YA sure the Swedish fire steels are the best. Ive started fires with just the sparks into the tinder.

 

Yeah that's all we use Swede.  Spark-to-tinder.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now

×