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Move slow.  Know where your setting your feet so you don't step on twids and such.  Set your feet down softly to reduce the russle of leaves.  If your trying to stalk something (not someone :nop: ) then take a few steps, stop and listen, then repeat. 

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Leather bottomed moccasins.  Can't beat 'em for sneaking, except maybe for some of those hi tech tactical boots that police and the military get.

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Leather bottomed moccasins.  Can't beat 'em for sneaking, except maybe for some of those hi tech tactical boots that police and the military get.

 

I second that moccasin thing.  They are awesome .  Don't leave hardly any tracks yourself.

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Watch where you step. It takes a lot of looking down but if thats what it takes to be quiet than thats what you have to do.

 

There are places where its impossible like dry leave or gravel or loose stones.

 

I personally dont reccomend comming down on your heel. I use my toes and or side of my foot.

 

Slow is the key. If I make a noise I will freeze and wait till I move again.

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May i suggest Alatma Black Military Issue Combat Boots used by navy seals. But it doesnt matter what you wear its what you step on. so i have experince in my recon ops (where i watch the neghibors house aka my best freind) and i find you gotta army crawl ever so slowely to get to someone

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I personally dont reccomend comming down on your heel. I use my toes and or side of my foot.

 

Slow is the key. If I make a noise I will freeze and wait till I move again.

 

I agree.

You want to come down as though you were walking on tip toes, front of foot first, slowly, slowly putting more and more weight on.  Walk with toes slightly pointed in (pigeon toed) so you grab less of anything (grass, twigs) as you are moving.

 

Another little caveat.  Don't do too much of this at once.  Stop, rest often.  Native americans could afford to walk this way all the time, it was a survival advantage.  Us, not so much.  You do at most 15 minutes of this at a time.  I overdid it while I was learning it and could barely walk the next day.

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Try not to wear nylon or stiff garments.  They will be more likely to make a russleing noise when your pant legs rub together or if you brush up against a bush.

 

Wash before you head out.  Try not to use perfumed soaps if possible.  This will help reduce the amount of scent you give off.

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Try not to wear nylon or stiff garments.

 

 

Another good suggestion.^^

 

Polarfleece lightweight with thin wool overpants works well.  If you want to go cheap, go to Goodwill or the like and buy men's dress pants, checking the label to make sure they are wool.  Most wool hunting pants seem to me to be too thick and heavy for all but the most severe weather.

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This may not apply to you, but here in Indiana we have thickets of bushes with thorns.  Avoid those.  I've never been able to get through them without making some kind of noise.

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One last suggestion.  While this thread is mainly about moving quietly, I've always found it more effective to hunt by knowing where the game is, getting there early, and silently waiting on them to appear.  One old time exercise is to move your arm so slowly that you can't see it moving, but you know it is.  It's a fine practice for patience and muscle control.

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Guest adrenjunky

Leather bottomed moccasins.  Can't beat 'em for sneaking, except maybe for some of those hi tech tactical boots that police and the military get.

Leather or crepe soles are the way to go. None of the tactical boots are even close to them.

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This may not apply to you, but here in Indiana we have thickets of bushes with thorns.  Avoid those.  I've never been able to get through them without making some kind of noise.

Yup, I HATE them!

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Leather or crepe soles are the way to go. None of the tactical boots are even close to them.

Yup, at rendevzous you can really tell who has actual leather bottomed mocs and who has rubber.  I got a question and before I waste some leather I want to know if this works.  If you put leather on the bottom of some tenis shoes or the like will they be like leather bottomed mocs?

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No.  You'll find that the leather will eventually work itself loose due to the gruelling punishment that you feet go through every day.  You'll be far better off getting yourself a nice light pair of moccasins.

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The moccasins will let you FEEL the ground and anything you might be about to step on.  No other boot or shoe will give you that feel.

 

Another tip:  move with the wind when possible.  When a breeze is blowing the branches and leaves around, you can mask the sound of your own movement.

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Moccasins wont work here in Illinois. Honeylocust, osage orange, and hawthorns will go right through those with no problem. It is dangerous to even ware tennis shoes around here. We have to put seal a flat gook in our quad tires its so bad.

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Guest Lead Dog

I remember reading a suggestion (might have been an old issue of Field & Stream) that one should walk an odd number of steps when stalking an animal.  I guess most predators will move with an even number of steps.  So a deer or other animal will be less cautious if it hears three footsteps as opposed to two.  Kinda makes sense if you think about how a cat stalks its prey.

 

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do a web search on "Fox Walk" ... I think that's right up your alley with this thread. Once you master it you feel as though you are hovering. Th way we were meant to walk IMHO. Dave if you don't already know it... could be a welcome addition to your hiking tutorials.

 

Rick

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