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You've hiked in to your campsite. Now youve set up your shelter and have a cooking fire going, but its still a while until mealtime.

 

What do you do until then?

 

Are you by yourself, camping alone, or are you surviving in your senario?

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1.  If it isn't raining, I collect firewood to put under plastic.  A day or two of dry firewood is a pearl beyond price.

 

2.  Kiss the wife.  Make sure the tent is comfortable.

 

3.  If alone, watch the perimeter, listen to the sounds, feel the movement of the air, sleep if necessary.

 

4.  Make some tinder and kindling and store under plastic.

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Once all the camp chores are done, I personally would put on a pot of coffee, light a cigar if the mood struck me and the bugs were biting, and just kick back!

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Are you by yourself, camping alone, or are you surviving in your senario?

 

Your by yourself, but your deliberately going to camp, its not forced on you. You could get out if you wanted to, (But you WOULDNT, LOL)

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You would be amazed at how much time can go by in simply feeding the fire and watching it.  It is something deep and atavistic, completely enjoyable...at least to me.

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I just got back from camping this weekend, and yes,Nurkerool, watching the fire was great. But then late at night we would all be scrunshed next to each other by the fire to keep warm. Itgot to 16* that night. Not that cold, unless your a boyscout.

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People are frankly amazed at the amount of clothing you have to take if you are going to winter camp.  The idea is to have enough clothing that you are comfortable.  Winter camping should not be a test of how cold you can take it, but a test of how comfortable you can be in it.  16 degrees, I'da been wearing 3 or 4 layers of clothing.  After the third day (for me) I can go down a layer, but that's all.

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My Dad always told me to take plenty of clothes because you can always take them off but you cant put any on if you dont have them.

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People are frankly amazed at the amount of clothing you have to take if you are going to winter camp.  The idea is to have enough clothing that you are comfortable.  Winter camping should not be a test of how cold you can take it, but a test of how comfortable you can be in it.  16 degrees, I'da been wearing 3 or 4 layers of clothing.  After the third day (for me) I can go down a layer, but that's all.

 

I had four layers on, both top and bottom:

 

Top:

Long Underwear Shirt

Long Sleeve Button-Down Shirt

(Uniform doesnt count)

Flannel Thick Cotton Coat

Down Vest

 

Bottom:

Underwear

Long Underwear

Jeans

(Possible Snowsuit pants)

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Here's what I'd suggest:

 

Ignore your shorts, they exist only to protect other layers.  Polypropylene long johns, polarfleece mid layer, tough outer windproof shell (could be thinsulate, down, or down substitute insulated if this doesn't seem to be enough).  If that still isn't enough, I'd go with maybe a silk layer under the polypropylene.  Avoid cotton unless you need it for an inner layer because you are allergic to either silk or polypro.  An alternate pant to the shell is a wool hunting pant, but they are usually heavy.  Wool is superb for staying warm when wet and is much more fire resistant than any of the synthetics.  I have used a quallofil quilted mid layer, but that was before polar fleece.  If you aren't sure what I mean by polar fleece, the original manufacturer is Malden Mills.

 

Looking at what you were wearing, you only had two layers on the bottom, and most jeans are cotton.  The flannel thick coat, again, cotton. 

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Here's what I'd suggest:

 

Ignore your shorts, they exist only to protect other layers.  Polypropylene long johns, polarfleece mid layer, tough outer windproof shell (could be thinsulate, down, or down substitute insulated if this doesn't seem to be enough).  If that still isn't enough, I'd go with maybe a silk layer under the polypropylene.  Avoid cotton unless you need it for an inner layer because you are allergic to either silk or polypro.  An alternate pant to the shell is a wool hunting pant, but they are usually heavy.  Wool is superb for staying warm when wet and is much more fire resistant than any of the synthetics.

I'll second all of that except the cotton part by the skin.  Cotton soaks up all moisture and looses all insulation, it makes for a poor night.

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SK, there are some people who are allergic to what seems like everything.  Sometimes they have to use a cotton inner liner to be comfortable at all.  That's the only situation I was talking about.  In boots, I've used a thin liner cotton sock with 1 or 2 wool layers over them very handily.  The cotton tends to wick the sweat away, and what it doesn't, the wool handles, keeping my feet warm.  The cotton socks are usually brought up out of the boot, so that the sweat can escape, without the immediate cooling of evaporation.  Now there are some hi-tech socks that are supposed to be superior to cotton for wicking.  I have tried some of these and like them.  They look like a thin liner sock, but have a silkier feel to them than cotton.

 

Some types of wool make me itch.

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SK, there are some people who are allergic to what seems like everything.  Sometimes they have to use a cotton inner liner to be comfortable at all.  That's the only situation I was talking about.  In boots, I've used a thin liner cotton sock with 1 or 2 wool layers over them very handily.  The cotton tends to wick the sweat away, and what it doesn't, the wool handles, keeping my feet warm.  The cotton socks are usually brought up out of the boot, so that the sweat can escape, without the immediate cooling of evaporation.  Now there are some hi-tech socks that are supposed to be superior to cotton for wicking.  I have tried some of these and like them.  They look like a thin liner sock, but have a silkier feel to them than cotton.

 

Some types of wool make me itch.

OK, I agree with you here then, sorry for the misunderstanding :)

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NO problem, SK.  This brings me to another point.  Before you splurge on a complete system, buy pieces and try them.  This stuff is so expensive that you don't want to get a complete system and then can't stand it.

 

Goodwill or Salvation Army is a good place to get pieces to try cheap.  Just check the care label to make sure what material you are buying.  If the care tag is gone, don't buy it.  I Still use the 300 dollar North Face jacket I got at a goodwill for $13.

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Your by yourself, but your deliberately going to camp, its not forced on you. You could get out if you wanted to, (But you WOULDNT, LOL)

 

You could take along a good relaxing book on survival to read. (lol)

or

Practice tracking skills - get down and get dirty.

or

Be sure you are working around camp at leaving no trace.

or

Study various foliage for what works best for fires, bushcraft, bedding, shelter material, edibitlity, etc.

 

Keep learning from what sits at your side silently yet has a wealth of information to share.

 

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For those times when it is just pouring rain and you have to stay in the tent, a miniature deck of cards for solitaire or one of those little computer solitaire games.  I suggest solitaire in lieu of a lot of other games because hands down it seems to have the most longevity.

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Do what my friends and I used to do way back when we were 12. Pour yourselves a glass of gingerale, or coke, or apple juice into a plastic champaigne glass, and have yourselves a toast!

 

Here's something I still do on occasion.  Take a shot of Pepsi, Coke, Sprite, or anything carbonated, and then knock it back (drink it all quickly like they do in the movies).  Once you get done wheezing and sputtering...you are sure you are starting to feel a little inebriated.....grin.

 

 

1000 posts!!!  Boy that snuck up on me!!

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Master tracker - whoo-whoo!   :thumbsup:  That's working it Nukerool! Congrats.  :grin:

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Here's something I still do on occasion.  Take a shot of Pepsi, Coke, Sprite, or anything carbonated, and then knock it back (drink it all quickly like they do in the movies).  Once you get done wheezing and sputtering...you are sure you are starting to feel a little inebriated.....grin.

 

 

1000 posts!!!  Boy that snuck up on me!!

 

 

I dont want tp be camping to try that...How 'bout now?

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Guest given to the sea...

~ well, maybe you'll be lucky enough to actually CATCH a fish then. 'Cause survivorman hasn't been so lucky lately...  :unsure:  (at fishing)

 

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