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Watcherofthewoods

What Type of Lighter?

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What type of lighter should we be carrying in our kits and why?  A Zippo?  A Bic?  Or some no name brand with ajustable flame hight?

I think this depends on your environment. I like zippos because they will burn without you having to hold it and this is good for drying damp wood, just make sure it doesn't leak before you put it in your pack, some do, especially the look-alikes. I like the bics because often they float and most are bright colored and easy to keep up with. Mainly I like the cricket as for an adjustable flame, and the others......, the no-name ones, usually just fall apart or melt when you use them to start the second or third fire. Those long- candle, grill, or fireplace lighters are good to have around but buy a name brand one. 

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The long 'stick' lighters are hard to trigger, as a child safety feature, bt that also makes them easy-proof. They might be hard to light with cold or wet hands.......

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I like bic. You can get them wet and dry them out and they still work. If they run out of fuel you can use them for walking at night just by striking them. Magnessium sparks are brighter than a flashlight.

 

Dont depend on one type of fire starter. Waterproof matches, strike anywhere farmer matches in a waterproof container and of course a Swedish fire stick and flint and steel. They dont weigh much so carring them is not a problem.

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I like bic. You can get them wet and dry them out and they still work. If they run out of fuel you can use them for walking at night just by striking them. Magnessium sparks are brighter than a flashlight.

 

Dont depend on one type of fire starter. Waterproof matches, strike anywhere farmer matches in a waterproof container and of course a Swedish fire stick and flint and steel. They dont weigh much so carring them is not a problem.

And these life boat matches are a good thing to have around also.

 

http://www.nitro-pak.com/product_info.php?cPath=77_162&products_id=213&osCsid=aa667a00414fc9704593b894fb271812

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SK, I think these would be good additions to your pack...

 

If you can find enough lighter fluid to fill this up, it's great for starting a bonfire...

lighterzg1.png

 

If you like a more natural way to start a fire...

matchdh0.png

 

And my personal favorite, the Gumby lighter...

53614885128f97b78e0we0.jpg

 

 

 

 

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lol, well Thanks Holly!

 

I just finished reading 98.6 degrees and he adressed this.  I personally like the no name ones that are cheap and have ajustable flames.  I wish Bic made the ajustable. 

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I keep a Zippo in my pocket, but in my PSK's I keep the disposable types.  The Zippo's fuel will evaporate over time if left in the kit, but the disposable lighters' fuel won't.  I figure  if all else fails and I have my Zippo and no fuel, I can take the cotton out of the Zippo's case, use the striker and still start a fire.

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Guest blacksmith

bic is the one I like for up here it is the best for salt water the flint does not fall apart as fast

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I carry a no name, flame adjustable, disposable lighter in my pack, a bic in my pocket and have a butane type of storm lighter that cost me $9.00 at Walmart.  It works well and has a home in one of my hiking packs.

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One thing to remember with lighters, butane must vaporize to light and burn.

 

In cold weather especially below zero, if your hands aren't warm enough to warm the butane, you don't have flame. :ranting:

I prefer a firestarter that will work in all conditions so I don't have to worry when I really need it.

 

I carry a bic for convenience, a zippo because they work in all conditions, waterproof farmer matches, and a mag stick.

 

I usually have tinder and a small candle for firestarting as well. One of those little candles for keeping the pot warm at ladies tea partys will burn for several hours for light, and can be used to start tinder even when the tinder is wet. You can also warm a cup of water if you have to.

 

I always like to have options. :grin:

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One thing to remember with lighters, butane must vaporize to light and burn.

 

In cold weather especially below zero, if your hands aren't warm enough to warm the butane, you don't have flame. :ranting:

I prefer a firestarter that will work in all conditions so I don't have to worry when I really need it.

 

I carry a bic for convenience, a zippo because they work in all conditions, waterproof farmer matches, and a mag stick.

 

I usually have tinder and a small candle for firestarting as well. One of those little candles for keeping the pot warm at ladies tea partys will burn for several hours for light, and can be used to start tinder even when the tinder is wet. You can also warm a cup of water if you have to.

 

I always like to have options. :grin:

Have you tried the Swedish Firesteels yet?

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Firesteels, IMO, are the way to go for starting fires.  You can master it in an afternoon, lasts for thousands of strikes.  I have one in the car, BOB, EDC knife holster.  1-2 strikes onto a small ball of dryer lint or a cotton ball with petroleum jelly, and BAM... fire!

 

See: http://www.survivaltopics.com/survival-supplies/   This guy is cheap and the steels (ferrocerium rods, actually) are top notch.

 

If you need a lighter, any of the above will do.  I myself, would go for the Gumby model.

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Hi Mistwalker,

 

Yes I have a firesteel as well.

I like the mag sticks as they burn so hot even wet that you can start damp tinder.

If I have dry tinder, firesteel is great.

 

I have several kits set up depending on where I am going and what I am doing. Lighter kits for just out for a short walk or morning looksee, a more involved kit for summer expeditions, heavy kit for winter, car kit, and I do have a bug out set in my garage as well.

 

I have some different components in each kit, mostly based on weight and what I can do with them and the application. The really light stuff is in the daypack.

 

Fire steels work fine, I usually use them in conjunction with a parafin/cotton tinder. Pretty easy light and works well in cold weather. I still prefer mag sticks for wet.

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I bought a Ronson a couple of months back for a couple of dollars at W-mart.  It has performed well and I have refilled it once.  I usually end up lighting a small stick like a match to start a fire, though.

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