Jump to content
WildSurvive Forum
Adi

Survival kits – Why and What

Recommended Posts

Whenever you go out for a walk, nature watching, canoeing, fishing or hunting there is a potential of something happening which can throw you into a survival situation. Imagine you take your dogs out for a walk one evening to a quiet area; you have been there many times before. You slip and badly twist your ankle; it swells up and hurts too much to put any weight on it. Day is turning to night, a cool breeze, frequent showers and the temperature is rapidly dropping, you’re about a mile from the road but it’s likely to be morning until another walker discovers you. The problem is many people don’t consider this and those that do, often think “it won’t happen to me”, this is a very dangerous state of thought to be in because you have switched yourself off from the risk. The simple act of choosing to carry a survival kit has made you think of the risk and consciously started the planning process of survival.

 

There is one other thing that we should do every time we leave home. That is to inform someone where we are going and when we are due back. Tell a partner, family member or trusted friend. In some wilderness areas you can go and log your trip at a ranger’s station or with the police. It is most important to tell them you are back safe too, you don’t want to cause panic and fear to a loved one or mobilise a professional search team whilst you are relaxing in the bath. The information you give can be as simple as telling your partner you are taking the dogs out for an hour and will be at so and so woods or as complex as a completed route card for your multi day hike with next to kin and medical history information for everyone in your group along with a complete group kit list and breakdown of skills available. Make the information you give relevant and in proportion to the trip you’re making. This also adds to your planning process of your trip.

 

A survival kit is a selection of items that will help you to get out of a situation or at least stabilise your internal life support system to keep you alive and to communicate your location to others. It should complement your kit yet contain enough to support you when you have nothing else. This in mind your survival kit should be with you at all times. This means in a trouser pocket or attached to your belt, not in a backpack or even a jacket pocket. We often remove our jackets and leave it in the car or in camp, and we can lose a jacket or backpack. There is not a problem of carrying extra survival items in you jacket or backpack; in fact this is a good idea to supplement your kit further. A survival kit should address a number of basic needs. These are shelter, water, fire, signalling and navigation. 

 

Shelter is anything that helps use maintain our normal body temperature from the elements. Our first line of defence is our clothing; we should dress correctly for the weather conditions expected for the area we are visiting, taking into account weather forecasts, regional variations, day and night variations and local knowledge. Many personal survival kits that are designed to be carried on your person do not cover shelter and if they do the survival kit is often too big and bulky and is forgotten about in the bottom of a backpack. In the addition of your personal survival kit you should carry a survival blanket or bag, a bag is preferable, these pack down very small and are very light, these will comfortably fit in a trouser pocket or on your belt in the same pouch as your survival kit. If you are on a day hike you would be well advised to carry additional means of shelter in the form of the more substantial survival shelters such as a heavy duty survival bag, a tarp or a moisture vapour permeable (MVP) bivibag. If you are going out with your family or in a group a group Bothy bag is an excellent option, these are large nylon bags that as a group you climb into and sit on the edges. They are excellent for taking breaks on the side of exposed mountains in poor weather, for treating casualties out of the elements, for sheltering from a passing storm or as an emergency shelter. If you are planning to spend a night or two out then additional shelter is not as important as you should have the use of your sleeping bag and tent. Even if your tent is damaged you can still rap yourself up in it. It might still be a good idea to carry a survival or bivi bag.

 

After shelter, water is the most important thing to preserve life. Your survival kit should at least have some water purification tablets and a heavy duty bag for collecting and storing water in. If you keep your survival kit in a belt pouch the pouch can be used to filter your water to help remove any suspended mater within it. You could include some heavy duty tinfoil to make a pot to boil your water in. Boiling water is still the best way to purify water. You could include a Milbank bag, a length of plastic tube, a water bottle and cook pot or metal mug in you backpack and/or a purification pump on longer trips.

 

Fire complements shelter, water and signalling. It provides heat to keep use warm and enables use to boil water. A survival kit should contain at least two different forms of fire lighting. Matches should be included along with a spark producing fire steel. A magnifying glass is a good addition too, the Fresnel lens is a good option as they pack away well and are light. Some form of tinder should be included. This can be anything from cotton wool, manufactured tinder’s, natural tinder’s, a candle or my favourite a length of rubber bicycle inner tube. It is also advisable to carry additional matches and a couple of Bic lighters on your person and scattered around your kit but it is important to keep your matches in waterproof containers.

 

Signalling is vitally important to attracting attention to you. No one should venture out with out a whistle and it is a good idea to back this up with a torch and a heliograph signal mirror. All these things should be carried in your survival kit or on your person. The international distress signal is three, three whistle blast or torch flashes, in Europe though it is six but if searchers are looking for you they will investigate anything that is out of ordinary. Searching for a loan person or even a group can be very difficult so anything that helps the searchers is an advantage, if someone has raised the alarm that you have not returned by a given time and has passed on information about your trip; you have a head start for being rescued. In many cases you will be rescued with in hours of being reported missing. Anything in your kit that stands out from the environment will attract attention to you so think outside of the box. A word of warning a forest fire is a very scary experience and is very likely to kill you and possibly others so do not set fire to the environment to attract attention.

 

All advise on survival suggests its often best to stay put when you find yourself in a survival situation but there are times when you have been turned around and you don’t know exactly where you are but because you have planned your trip or live locally you know the lie of the land and a simple compass may be all you need to know in which direction to go to get to a landmark, camp or road and get yourself out of a forced night out or a survival situation. It is good practice to carry and know how to use a map and compass. The best compass to have is a base plate compass that is attached to your person and your map in a pocket.

 

There are some additional items that should be included in your survival kit. A knife of some description is a must and a solid fixed blade knife attached to your belt is your primary survival tool. Some people prefer to carry a folding blade; if this is true for you then you should choose a lock blade with a blade length of at least 2 ½ inches. Most survival kits contain a one sided razor blade or a scalpel blade but these require you to make a handle, a pack of five surgical scalpel blades in a foil packet and a surgical scalpel handle are a great option. A wire saw is an option but likely to break, a folding pruning saw is a preferable option kept in your backpack.

 

A method of mending your clothes or kit is advisable in the form of a needle and strong thread and possibly a length of heavy duty sticky tape. A couple of safety pins will not take up much space in your survival kit either. A length of strong nylon cord is very useful. It’s also a good idea to keep a good length of paracord type string in you backpack. Pencil and paper should be part of you navigation equipment but you can include a small pencil and paper to your survival kit for leaving messages, making notes or keeping a survival log. A survival aid memoir with basic survival instructions is very important, when we are forced suddenly into hi stress situations our brains struggle to function properly and our IQ roles back several million years, by having some simple instructions help use to focus and guide us through the experience. A list of survival kit contents is also useful, at a glance we know what’s in the kit.

 

There are a few things we can carry with us that do not appear in the kit; these are knowledge, improvisation and experience. By thinking about carrying a survival kit we have started planning for something going wrong, by practicing and knowing how everything in your kit works we are gaining knowledge, this can be expanded by reading and or doing a survival course. This all expands our knowledge, starts to teach us how to improvise and is always adding to our experience. The more we plan for our trips out and experience new things on those trips the more experienced we become. With knowledge and experience a survival situation should be nothing more than a relatively comfortable time forced to stay out until you are picked up by rescuers.

 

Items I have left out of a survival kit. If you have done the right thing and informed someone where you are going and when you will be back, most people in a survival situation will be rescued within 72 hours, we can live without food for much longer than this so food should not be a consideration within your survival kit. It would be sensible to carry some extra food in your backpack though, just in case. Food procurement has not been considered either, catching and collecting food takes a lot of energy and is very hit or miss, mostly weighted on the miss side. You are not likely to collect enough food to replace the energy used so in most cases its better to conserve that energy. The easiest source of good quality food in the wild is fish so it might be a good idea to include a small basic fishing kit in your survival kit, you might find yourself next to a river stocked with fish. Again if you are going for a longer trip or to remote areas it would be a good idea to carry a fishing kit, gill net and snares or even a rifle in your backpack.

 

A basic first aid kit should be carried separately on the person from your survival kit backed up by a more comprehensive first aid kit containing your medicines in your backpack.

 

Choosing a survival kit can quite difficult there are so many options out there, do you buy one or build your own. As many of use that have studied survival for any length of time know, there are many survival kits on the market that are a compromise between amount of equipment it contains and quality of equipment. Many kits are aimed at a price bracket with the equipment in them being sourced to meet that cost. This more often than not means the kit contains cheap items that are not designed specifically for the task in hand, are of poor construction and can not withstand the riggers of the outdoors. Some kits are filled with nothing more than children’s toys. Be aware of this and be aware that some reputable outdoor companies and even survival kit supplier’s sale very cheap poorly made survival kits. If you want to buy a survival kit research it first and try to find some reliable recommendations for it. Finely don’t skimp on money, your life might depend on it.

 

Many survival kits are aimed at the military market; these kits are often good but are designed for military survival which covers more advanced survival techniques which dictate they have more items found in them. This does not mean the items found in these kits are of the best quality. The items are often a compromise between weight, size and cost. A soldier often operates with only his fighting kit, he does not have the luxury of supplementing his survival kit with other survival items in his backpack so his survival kit has to hold more items to cover more eventualities but still being as small and light as possible. Take a fighter pilot for instance. He does not carry much personal kit so his survival kit is quite large, bulky and heavy. It is delivered to the pilot from within his ejector seat once he has been ejected, which also carries other survival items such as a hand axe, personal life raft with its own sea survival kit, rations and water, signalling kit in the form of radio, strobe lights and flares. His parachute is part of his kit and will provide shelter and even his helmet is a survival tool.

 

As civilians we are not constrained by many of these limitations so our survival kits only need to cover the fundamental survival skills meaning we can concentrate on quality of the items. With this in mind it is often best to source our own survival items    and build a kit that best complements us. By doing this we can buy the very best survival equipment we can afford to cover all the skills of shelter, water, fire, signalling and navigation. Some survival items are quite hard to find on there own so it is often a good idea to purchase a survival kit as a head start and replace items with better items as you find them and/or to supplement the kit with other items.

 

A survival kit should be an evolving piece of kit as it is changed and updated. My survival kit is like the preverbal broom that has had its head changed fifteen times and it handle changed nine times over the years. My survival kit started life over 20 years ago and has constantly evolved with the only original item left in it being the metal surgical scalpel blade handle.

 

Military personnel often have rules called standard operating procedures that dictate a survival kit must be carried and this often includes how, what and where it is carried. Civilian pilots and sailors often have laws dictating that they must carry survival items but there are no such laws governing people that go into the outdoors, it is down to the individual to decide if and what survival equipment they carry. Many people, even experienced outdoors people know they should carry something but don’t know exactly what. Let’s have a recap on each of the areas in survival we need to consider and list some of the items that can be carried in a survival kit, on the person or in a backpack.

 

Shelter

 

PSK 

Foil survival blanket or bag,

 

On person

Plastic survival bag, tube tent, large rubbish sacks.

 

Backpack

Advanced survival bags, tarp, MVP bivi bag, Bothe bag, sleeping bag, tent.

 

Water

 

PSK 

Water purification tablets, heavy duty tinfoil for making pot,

 

On person

Material water filter, water bottle,

 

Backpack

Water purification pump, Milbank bag, flexible plastic tube, large water container or bladder, pot for boiling in.

 

Fire

 

PSK

Matches, waterproof matches, fire steel, magnifying glass, homemade, manmade or natural tinder.

 

On person

Matches, Bic lighter, fire steel, homemade, manmade or natural tinder.

 

Backpack

Matches, lighter, homemade, manmade or natural tinder, fuel, stove

 

Signalling

 

PSK

Whistle, heliograph signal mirror.

 

On person

Torch, mobile phone, epirb personal location beacon, two way radio, strobe light

 

Backpack

Signal panels, flares, smoke, satellite phone.

 

Navigation

 

PSK

Button compass,

 

On person

Base plate compass, map.

 

Backpack

Spear compass, maps, GPS

 

Miscellaneous Items

 

PSK

Scalpel blade and handle, string, needle and thread, pencil and paper, strong sticky tape, survival instructions

 

On person

Fixed blade knife, torch, first aid kit.

 

Backpack

First aid and medication, folding saw, axe, food, snares, fishing kit, gill net cooking pots.

 

The final note if you do get thrown into a survival situation first Stop, Think, Observe and Plan, move away from further danger and treat any injuries. Take a moment to compose yourself, contemplate the situation, make a physical check of what you have to hand and build a strategy. Next you need to set out your signals, construct a shelter and prepare a fire, in what order these happen in are up to you but the order should be dictated by the circumstances. Acquisition of water should be thrown in there somewhere too but one would hope you have enough on you too see you through the first stages of the situation. Once this is done you need to build a routine to keep you occupied, spend time in making yourself as comfortable as possible and conserve as much energy as possible. Try to keep in good spirits and stay positive.

 

Copyright © 2008 Adrian Floyde

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I have had this added to the front page of the website, i hope you guys find this helpfull and interesting.

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Looks good Adi thanks for the effort.  :thumbup: Ill give that 10 mooses>

 

moose0024.gif moose0024.gif moose0024.gif moose0024.gif moose0024.gif moose0024.gif moose0024.gif moose0024.gif moose0024.gif moose0024.gif

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Great article Adi.... valuable information.

 

Coming from a "laid back survivalist" angle... I'd like to give my 2 cents.... alright maybe just 1 cent... lol.

 

I'll play the part of devil's advocate...... lol.

 

I'm going to talk about local trail hikes.... where most folks tend to leave their kits in the vehicle (foolish... but true) As much as I agree with everthing you have said... many people see a "all-encompassing" survival kit as "overkill"... Most would never be able to logically explain why it would be, but it has been my experience that the average city chicken bawks at a specialized kit.

 

How prepared am I on a casual hike????............ Gooood question! I wrote this response on another site that was discussing the contents of the "Altoids Tin Survival Kit". Much of it applies here... some of it repeats what you have already said... but I don't feel like editing... ha ha ha!

 

********************************************************

 

I've never been a fan of altoid can kits... I don't like having all my eggs in one basket. Lose the can... lose it all! I have a different approach... it may not be ideal for every situation, but I think it covers the "day hike on a local trail" scenario.

 

Unless your particular trail is rarely travelled the odds are someone will get close to you within 48hrs. To survive 48hrs you don't need to eat or drink unless you're very active, in which case you should be "actively" getting your butt to the trail head, anyway. Your enemies will be injuries and exposure.

 

INJURIES

When you're talking injuries, I imagine broken bones, animal maulings, diabetic complications, loss of sight and rare conditions like heart attacks, exploding appendix, stroke, etc... How well/appropriately can you be equiped for these?

 

Advil and Tylenol are for discomfort... having them isn't going to make or break your chances of getting out of there. Unless you're carying narcotics(like T-3's, Demoral or something), you aren't getting up and walking 2miles on a broken leg with only Ibuprofen in your system. Learn some basic wilderness first aid. Make a splint... if your foot is busted up, don't take your boot off... they teach you all these things and it weighs nothing!

 

Diabetic meds?... if you are diabetic and you're not carrying.... you are a fool.

 

Open wounds from a mauling, knife mishap or a slip'n'fall should be addressed. A large field dressing is a plus but bulky... you could use a clean bandana wrapped around your sock or shirt to slow bleeding (again... wilderness first aid). Carrying a small amount of antibiotic ointment is something to consider... cutting your ankle on a rusty old half burried paint can could lead to a nasty infection without some disinfecting treatment. Duct tape makes good butterfly sutures for closing wounds (not to mention a million other uses) carrying a few feet is a good idea. Appendix, heart attack??? Good luck to you! (carry meds if you have a bad heart)

 

EXPOSURE

It's a quick killer if you're ill prepared. Space blankets, bags, tubes are compact and usefull in all conditions (reflecting sun away or reflecting heat inward. Making sure you are properly dressed before you head out is just common sense. 7hr heatpacks are available everywhere (they do not work at -35F BTW!!! brrrr) Fire making tools are a "hot ticket" item... punn intended. I stress the fact that... knowledge in survival skills is EVERYTHING.

 

SIGNALING

A cellphone (if its charged) can save your life! Whistles, flashlights, flares, mirrors are all good... more than one method of signaling should be carried. The "note in the car" thing is good if you need rescue... but is also helpful for thieves in choosing a car to rob....

 

"12pm, gone for a 2hr hike... if I'm not back by nightfall, send rescue... Ps (theives).. the door is unlocked and the keys are under the floormat... please leave this note tacked to a tree should you decide to make off with my ride"

 

Just kidding... lol .. but not really.

 

WHAT I CARRY

I have a lightweight, packable rain jacket and in the pockets I put...

 

- a space blanket

- dental floss (lg container about the size of a tic-tac box great cordage)

- 4ft of duct tape (wrapped around the dental floss container)

- bic lighter

- a few bandages and some ointment.

- a bandana

- a whisle

- a small SAK

 

I will either wear the jacket, tie it around my waist or pack it up and clip it to my belt.

 

Whether I'm on the trail or in town I always have on me....

 

- key chain with firesteel and paracord fob.

- SAK camper

- cellphone

- ID (wallet... packed full of tinder... lol)

- Common sense (unless you ask my wife)

 

I may not be the most prepared guy when it comes to equipment carried... I haven't sat and thought out every scenario... but I feel confident in my ability to improvise.

 

Some of my uneducated friends laugh at the fact I even carry the few items I do. I always respond with... "It wasn't raining when Noah built the ark."

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Great article.  The only question I have is what is a Milbank or Bothe bag?  If you did explain in the article, I apologize for missing it.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

 

 

I may not be the most prepared guy when it comes to equipment carried... I haven't sat and thought out every scenario... but I feel confident in my ability to improvise.

 

Some of my uneducated friends laugh at the fact I even carry the few items I do. I always respond with... "It wasn't raining when Noah built the ark."

 

Like you, for my close-to-home hikes I count on past learning experiences, and my abilities to improvise with the items I ALWAYS have on me and things I know can be found in the area I'm headed to so really don't need to be carried. Lol, how many times in history have wise men been ridiculed by fools. History books are full of those stories yet the fools are prolific.  Most think what's in their wallets can fix any problem......, if the economies falter, I hope they like the taste of paper and plastic......, I think I'd much prefer roasted crickets to boiled cash or sautee'd plastic lol

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Most think what's in their wallets can fix any problem

 

Now hey!!!  They might be carrying a Swiss Army Card.

 

SA57901-2T.jpg

 

 

:thumbsup:

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Now hey!!!  They might be carrying a Swiss Army Card.

 

SA57901-2T.jpg

 

 

:thumbsup:

You know what I meant...., lol, the ones I'm refering to probably have no idea what a Swiss card is

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

My survival kit lives as a large fanny pack that can convert to a daypack.  I've thought of using a survival vest system, but the fanny pack is compatible with a host of different configurations of clothing and carry.

 

I can wear it with a backpack, even the large ones Tess and I use for winter backpacking.

 

I can wear it with a life vest in a boat fishing.

 

If for some reason I want to wear it slung as a carry bag, I can lengthen the belt and take it over the opposite shoulder. (I carried my first survival kit like that for at least a decade)

 

It can be worn with the pack part in the back as a fanny, or it will carry nicely in front as well.

 

If I open out the daypack part, there's enough room for 2 liters of water, a small tent, a 6 x 8 tarp, a small cook set and probably a couple of days' food to boot.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
You know what I meant...., lol,

 

Yep, I was poking fun...grin.  I do think you could do a lot with a nice thin piece of stainless steel, credit card sized in a sheath in the wallet, with razor sharp edges?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Yep, I was poking fun...grin.  I do think you could do a lot with a nice thin piece of stainless steel, credit card sized in a sheath in the wallet, with razor sharp edges?

I think so too, but watch what you sharpen...., I got in trouble for sharpening my metal journeyman's card when the job steward at the nuclear plant asked to see it...., it cut into his finger a little bit, lol, he made me dull it which didn't take long......, HEY RICK! could you heat-treat a credit card sized piece of steel??

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Now hey!!!  They might be carrying a Swiss Army Card.

 

SA57901-2T.jpg

 

 

:thumbsup:

I am!  Its ALWAYS with me!  At least when I have my wallet.... I want to make a altoid kit for carry durrying places where I cant carry my PSK.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Adi, I don't want to detract from your information, but your first paragraph as it reads below left me to think about posting one type of Emergency Daily Carry Bag and gear I use. Hope you do not mind.  It may help others to see how little could be so helpful.

 

Adi's Post: "Whenever you go out for a walk, nature watching, canoeing, fishing or hunting there is a potential of something happening which can throw you into a survival situation. Imagine you take your dogs out for a walk one evening to a quiet area; you have been there many times before. You slip and badly twist your ankle; it swells up and hurts too much to put any weight on it. Day is turning to night, a cool breeze, frequent showers and the temperature is rapidly dropping, you’re about a mile from the road but it’s likely to be morning until another walker discovers you. The problem is many people don’t consider this and those that do, often think “it won’t happen to me”, this is a very dangerous state of thought to be in because you have switched yourself off from the risk. The simple act of choosing to carry a survival kit has made you think of the risk and consciously started the planning process of survival."

 

So here are some ideas for folks to consider who want something that weighs less than 10 pounds, food included.

 

The following is taken everywhere I go, with the exception of Government Buildings or high security businesses.

 

The Water Kit

Contains: A two gallon zip-lock freezer bag for potable water storage after filtered and purified; a blue bandana for filtering debris from water; two smaller zip-lock bags for insertion to drink clean water from can; a small dehydrated sponge to absorb water from plants and leaves; water potable/purifying tablets; folded aluminum foil for back up, heating, and collecting; coffee paper filters to filter out smaller particles of sediment; a can for boiling water or drinking from; and soda can is optional if you choose to take or find; and finally some activated charcoal in a med bottle for water cleansing purposes.

 

01waterkitgq1.jpg

 

The Water Kit in compact form.

 

02waterkitab2.jpg

 

The Signalling and Light Kit

Contains: A LED Flashlight with three color combinations - white, red, & blue; a strobe light that can be pinned to the clothing or magnetically set on a vehicle; a glow stick; two mirror signalling devices; a whistle with matches for signal fire - and it also has a small mirror inside the lid, with a small compass on outside of lid.

 

03signalandlightingvq8.jpg

 

Sheltering Materials

Contains: Disposable rain poncho; disposable space blanket; duct tape; and recently added - a twin size vinyl mattress cover with zipper.  This is not the strongest form of protection but in a quick need to block a downpour or snow or wind, this could work.  "I have not tested this out as of yet for durability."

 

05shelternz6.jpg

 

A Minimumal First Aid Kit

Contains: Tissue; Hand Warmers; Gauze; Sanitary Pad (well designed for deep cuts); band-aids; and neosporin.

 

06firstaidkitoo8.jpg

 

Fire Kit

Contains: 0000 Fine Steel Wool, 9-Volt battery, and wire to conect between the two.

Contains: Magnesium Bar and 2 Strikers (One is heavy duty from Scott Gossman's Knives, Forum Member.) along with dryer lint.

Contains: Lighter and Windproof/Waterproof Matches.

Contains: Dry srips of thin cardboard, q-tips, small nalgene bottle of petroleum gel.  The Q-Tips when covered with petroleum gel act like mini torches to start a fire.

Contains: A medicine bottle that holds the dryer lint, a piece of toilet tissue roll, & a votive candle. Strapped around the outside are strips of bicycle tire tubing.

 

08firekitqq0.jpg

 

Fire Kit Packed

 

14firekiteeco4.jpg

 

Three Different Blades, Sharpener, Paracord 550, Compass

 

15knivessharpenercompasjv9.jpg

 

Leatherman Wave, Diamond Sharpener, Scout Ferro Rod and Gossman Knives Striker

 

17leathermanwavesharpenki6.jpg

 

The sharpener and ferro rod fit neatly inside the pouch that holds the Leatherman.

18leathermanwavesharpenru0.jpg

 

The Verizon GzOne Cellular phone with GPS Navigation.

 

19verizongzonecellphonenl0.jpg

 

A Food Pouch

 

20foodsuppliescc7.jpg

 

The Total Pack - weighing again - less than 10 pounds and accompanied by 1/2 gallon of water in a separate shoulder carrying pouch.

Attached to the shoulder strap you see the flashlight, food pouch, and a spare wallet.

 

21completeemergencydailzd7.jpg

 

All this is so simple and carried along with my regular handbag that gears up with a few other nice items I dare go no where without.

Remember this is just the small kit. Backpack and vehicle are fully loaded as well.  Can't stress the thought on water and having the means to procure.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Yes you can

 

Cool, would you have to heat treat the whole thing or just the edges? Would only want to sharpen two edges but strengthen the whole thing if possible.

 

Instead of stainless, let's make the credit card out of Questek C-69.

 

????

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Ferrium C69 can be heat treated to an intermediate case hardness of 60 HRC,

providing grindability equivalent to current gear materials, and then tempered to

67 HRC case hardness with extremely low distortion.

 

 

Ferrium C69 was designed for high-temperature carburizing. This allows solution

heat treatment to be combined with the carburizing treatment and Ferrium C69 is

therefore quenched directly from the carburizing temperature. After quenching to

room temperature Ferrium C69 is subjected to liquid nitrogen immersion to

assure a complete martensitic transformation. A final temper at 875ºF (468°C)

produces an ultrahigh-hard surface with excellent wear resistance. Ferrium C69

has excellent thermal resistance up to the temper temperature. If desired,

Ferrium C69 can be nitrided to increase the surface hardness to near 70 HRC

(1100 HV). Final shot peening is recommended for superior fatigue and wear

performance.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I have heard of this stuff, but it makes for poor knife steel. First off... the high transformation temp is difficult to keep consistant in the thicknesses that a knife blade requires. (especially credit card size) the Rockwell count in the high 60's - 70's is crazy brittle in thiner stock sizes. Cryogenic tempering and normalizing is expensive (although, I think I could sneak it into a batch with a company I used to deal with years ago) This metal is usually used in tool and die operations and are thick bars/blocks manly for shearing not slicing.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now

×