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tsegura

Unnatural scents

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Most of us who spend time hunting or fishing know that human or unnatural scents can deter animals and fish from being caught. Most of us have knives or tools that we take very good care of ( cleaning and oiling etc..) what affect does this have on your chances of catching a meal ? Example: you just cleaned and oiled your favorite knife and you get stranded in the woods now you have to use it to make a snare or set up a fish trap and now you have a oily smell on your hands and on your traps you just made. What type of natural scent eleminators are there in nature to better hide these smells and better your chances for a meal ?

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Smoke is the the bast knows smoke your traps, tools and even yourself.

 

One that i was taught as a kid poaching with the old boys was too boil your traps and snares in water and dead oak leaves. This not only removed the scent but also stained everything a nice brown colour including brass snares.

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Most of us who spend time hunting or fishing know that human or unnatural scents can deter animals and fish from being caught. Most of us have knives or tools that we take very good care of ( cleaning and oiling etc..) what affect does this have on your chances of catching a meal ? Example: you just cleaned and oiled your favorite knife and you get stranded in the woods now you have to use it to make a snare or set up a fish trap and now you have a oily smell on your hands and on your traps you just made. What type of natural scent eleminators are there in nature to better hide these smells and better your chances for a meal ?

Some primitive tribal hunters use animal dung to mask scents.

 

 

 

One that i was taught as a kid poaching with the old boys was too boil your traps and snares in water and dead oak leaves. This not only removed the scent but also stained everything a nice brown colour including brass snares.

I was taught the same technique with the dried and brown hulls from black walnuts

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Ever use Skunk Cabbage?

 

ummm we call it skunk lettice here, in my experience most people dont know of it but those that do have experimented with it!

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You have to urinate on your traps. That way when  the little critters come to source out your marked territory...bam...you nail him. LOL!

 

I dunno, I've got no tracking skills, but I've definitely snared a couple of animals before. 1 rabbit, 1 squirrel and an escaped chicken...and none of them have complained about my smelly traps.  :nono:

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Rabbits are by far the most desirable wild food to trap and easiest to catch and human smell isnt that much important to them.The toughest around here are coyotes and nothing will eat a dead coyote. I havent seen vultures eat a dead coyote.I see no reason to trap coyotes in a survival situation.

 

Water sets for muskrats beaver mink raccoons and otters dont need anything to mask human scent but bait is important.

 

I have never used snares to trap with. I only used steel leg traps.

 

Snares will work on deer. It will take a very strong cable and it wont be pretty. Find a trail where the deer are funneled through a narrow area and hang the loop over the trail.

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One method to remove or cover odor is to just take a sack filled with soil, leaves, other detritus from that area and place clothing, boots, leather (holsters, belts, sheaths) inside the bag with the soil and leaves for 24 hours or so.

 

If you have a good, oily knife, maybe you can wipe it down with soil to absorb the oil and then with the most pungent leaves you can find.  Oil is hard to eliminate, but if you have something you can use as a rag, wipe the blade down with that first, then try the soil and leaves.  What do you guys think? 

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Animals far removed from civilization are more suspicious of human scent. In todays world they have become accustom to human smell and human generated odors. Professional trappers carry drop cloths to kneel down on, super dry fine soil to cover the trap with,and a variety of scent oils.

 

The longer the nose on the animal the more sensitive it is to unaccustomed scents.Ive seen hounds follow human tracks without putting their nose on the ground. I watched my dads fox hounds come onto a group of tracks from the hunters gathering during a hunt and pick out my dads tracks from the mix and take off on his tracks.

 

Ive watched a white tail buck lay down tracks to confuse the hounds by running around in a cattle lot to get the cows to chase him to cover up his tracks. I watched coyotes walk down small blow down tree limbs and jump off as far as they can. If you watch rabbits they will suddenly stop and jump as far off the trail as far as they can. 

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ummm we call it skunk lettice here, in my experience most people dont know of it but those that do have experimented with it!

 

Very useful stuff for hiding many things.

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Ever use Skunk Cabbage?

 

ummm we call it skunk lettice here, in my experience most people dont know of it but those that do have experimented with it!

??? ?

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So sorry Mist. 

 

Skunk Cabbage is a cabbage-like wild plant that grows in moist wet wild areas and is not - I repeat IS NOT edible.

If you break the leaves or stems, a pungent odor is released that stinks like a skunk.  The animals of the wood are familiar with its smell, so nothing unusual to them.  They walk all through it.  It will mask just about any scent you may have on your equipment.

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So sorry Mist. 

 

Skunk Cabbage is a cabbage-like wild plant that grows in moist wet wild areas and is not - I repeat IS NOT edible.

If you break the leaves or stems, a pungent odor is released that stinks like a skunk.  The animals of the wood are familiar with its smell, so nothing unusual to them.  They walk all through it.  It will mask just about any scent you may have on your equipment.

 

Do you have some pics of it that you could post ? What areas of the country does this grow in ? Sounds great !

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Guest blacksmith

So sorry Mist. 

 

Skunk Cabbage is a cabbage-like wild plant that grows in moist wet wild areas and is not - I repeat IS NOT edible.

If you break the leaves or stems, a pungent odor is released that stinks like a skunk.  The animals of the wood are familiar with its smell, so nothing unusual to them.  They walk all through it.  It will mask just about any scent you may have on your equipment.

 

 

 

 

Lost you should try a book that I have on plants it is called  plants of the pacific northwest coast page 334 tells of skunk cabbage I do not know if it is the same plant you are talking of but I think it is 

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Guest blacksmith

spruce is what we use up here to hide scent on are traps that is the needles we boil the traps in needles and water

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So sorry Mist. 

 

Skunk Cabbage is a cabbage-like wild plant that grows in moist wet wild areas and is not - I repeat IS NOT edible.

If you break the leaves or stems, a pungent odor is released that stinks like a skunk.  The animals of the wood are familiar with its smell, so nothing unusual to them.  They walk all through it.  It will mask just about any scent you may have on your equipment.

 

 Thanks, I'll have to look online for pics, then check out the river bottoms and marshes around here.

 

spruce is what we use up here to hide scent on are traps that is the needles we boil the traps in needles and water

 

Now spruce is something we have little of, but lots of cedar, and hemlock trees

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Oh yeah, wear gloves.  It takes a while to get the scent off.

I can imagine, my brother and I once found a run-over skunk and decided to take the hide, the sacks inside were busted, and though by the time we got to the store we could barely smell it anymore the rest of the customers sure cleared out quick :)

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Guest blacksmith

it all works hemlock is good  but bark of any tree will to.    trapping  is a way of life here I like to trap beaver the most because they are meat and fur and no the tail is not good all fat 

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You are one crazy fella.  I can hear those people now.  :rofl:

Yeah, it was interesting, the clerk didn't even want to get close enough to ring us up so we didn't get our change :D

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it all works hemlock is good  but bark of any tree will to.    trapping  is a way of life here I like to trap beaver the most because they are meat and fur and no the tail is not good all fat 

Never had beaver but ate lots of muskrat back in my trapping days here on this river. What does beaver taste like?

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Sort of stringy beef. Dark meat. We sold beaver carcases to Chinese markets in California back in the 60s. Its quite the delicacy in the Chinese community. We barbecued it.

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