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Kentucky Bob

A Beginner's Guide to Firearms For Survival, Hunting and Defense

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It is going to be the same bill as before only to include semi auto shotguns and rifles in general.

 

And KB did you see the one for banning pocket knives ?

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Yep, I saw that.  Lunacy knows no boundaries.   taunt12.gif wacky078.gif

 

 

I'm here to tell you, this time they will not settle for just AK's or AR's.  Ruger 10/22's, Browning Sweet 16's, Remington 1100's.  Folks, I'm telling you, join now, get loud now, call, write or email now.  Or, give up, now.

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I don't know if anyone else watches Glen Beck (he goes after Dems and Reps equally--he's Libertarian), but yesterday he had Wayne LaPierre of the NRA on the show.  Feinstein and her bunch of anti's claim that the weaponry used in Mexican drug cartel violence comes from the U.S. (fully auto AK's are evidently available to the general public and no one told me....).  I've been saying the whole time that the weapons come from Central America (plenty of AK's and M16's leftover from various revolutions).  Anyway, if you want to see the interview between Beck and LaPierre follow the link:

 

http://glenbeck.com/

 

Look in the upper right hand of the screen for Featured Videos and look for "Taking Aim".

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I saw on cnn about how the U.S. was supplying guns for the Mexican drug cartel. What a bunch of crap.

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what about everybody buying ammo there is a shortage. I heard on Coast to Coast. that people are stocking up ammo because they think it's going to be hard to get ammo in the future. I saw it at walmart alot of people were getting ammo there.

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You're right, Kim.  From the day after the election there has been a run on every outlet that sells ammunition.  There have been several different schemes to place extremely high taxes on ammo, as well as what is known as "laser etching."  Another scheme involved requiring ammunition to have a "shelf life" so that it couldn't be stored very long.  Now that Attorney General Eric Holder has said that he would like to re-state the so-called "Assault Weapons" Ban, people are rushing to buy firearms and ammunition.  I myself have seen the empty shelves at Wal Mart and other stores, and just take a look at the big on-line retail outlets and you'll see that they're out of stock on most popular ammo.

 

If you'd like to see, go to:

 

Cheaper than Dirt:  www.cheaperthandirt.com

 

Natchez Shooters Supply:  www.natchezss.com

 

The Sportsmans Guide:  www.sportsmansguide.com

 

Look at the popular ammo like .45 ACP, .38 Special, 9mm, .357 Magnum, and .223 Remington or 7.62x39mm.  For the most part the ammo is out of stock unless there is a particularly expensive box that is so pricey even the desperate buyers are passing it up.

 

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I saw an interview on CNN with someone that the U.S. is still supplying guns to the Mexican drug dealers with no proof. Its a total fabrication.

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I saw an interview on CNN with someone that the U.S. is still supplying guns to the Mexican drug dealers with no proof. Its a total fabrication.

 

That's the problem, Swede.  Will they allow someone else to go on-air to tell folks where those guns really come from?  Probably not.

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After viewing an hour long program on National Geo Graphic about fire arm deaths in the U.S. and questioning their numbers I did a little research on the net. In fact gun related deaths of all types had FALLEN consistently since records have began. Every indicator for youth in home accidents,hunting accidents, suicide, homicide, and murder is DOWN.

http://www.nssf.org/PDF/IIR_V2N5.pdf

 

Point of fact driving your automobile is more dangerous.

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Almost brick throwing at the TV Bob. Im not a fan of slanted or just plain lies about any thing.

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They actually claimed a person dies from a fire arm every hour of every day. Maybe they included Iraq, Afghanistan. Africa, Mexico, and Texas.

(I lied about Texas)    :woot:

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Ok, getting back on subject....

 

 

One more thing about revolvers before I move on to semi-autos.  I'm going to demonstrate the proper...and improper...ways of loading a revolver and semi-automatic pistol.  Swede and I reasoned that there are a lot of places with information about how to do exactly what I will be doing, but at least here we can show the proper and safe ways of doing these tasks.

 

Please, please, PLEASE read the manual that came with your firearm before you do anything else.  IF you do not have a manual, contact the manufacturer or check their website.  Any of them would rather send you a free manual than have you make a guess as to how to operate the firearm.  This is as simple as Natural Selection, folks.

 

I will prepare this article over the weekend since I need some new photos, and will hopefully have this ready to go on Sunday (I'm off tomorrow and should have time to get some good photos).  Again, any questions you have will be happily answered so don't be afraid to ask.

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Awright, here we go....

 

Whenever loading or unloading a firearm, assume it's already loaded and keep the muzzle pointed in a safe direction.  Be VERY SURE that you are loading the correct ammunition.  Your firearm will have the chambering stamped on the barrel or receiver.  On a revolver you have to locate the cylinder latch (as shown in the earlier section on revolvers at http://www.wildsurvive.com/index.php?option=com_smf&Itemid=73&topic=3269.60 ).  I mentioned before that you need to control the cylinder when it swings out, the best way is shown here, with the middle, ring finger and thumb of the left hand holding the cylinder steady:

 

1001696.jpg

 

If there are empty casings in the cylinder, use the ejector rod to push them out--be vigorous!  You want the empties to fall free.  Again, go to the link above for a refresher on revolvers to see the ejector rod.  Now, if you are loading a single cartridge at a time it's pretty straight forward.  The bullet goes into the chamber first and you'll still see the headstamp (the brand and caliber) printed on the cartridge base...:

 

1001698n.jpg

 

...and repeat until all the cylinder's chambers are full.: 

 

 

1001710.jpg

 

Now, close the cylinder.  Remember to keep the muzzle pointed down so that the cartridges don't fall back out of the the cylinder.  DO NOT snap the cylinder shut with a flick of the wrist as you may have seen in Hollywood!  This is hard on the gun's crane which attaches the cylinder to the revolver's frame.  Close the cylinder with your left thumb:

 

1001711.jpg

 

The revolver is now loaded and ready for use.  It takes some time to do this little operation, but practice will make it go more quickly.  Once you've figured this part out, it's time to move on to using speedloaders.  Speedloaders are designed to hold the cartridges to reload your revolver more quickly:

 

1001713.jpg

 

1001715v.jpg

 

You can't just use any speedloader for your revolver, they are model-specific.  Although some can be used with multiple revolvers, you need to get the correct speedloader for your revolver.  I exclusively use HKS brand speedloaders.  I've never had any problems with their products and find them to be uber-reliable.  The manufacturer's website has a complete listing of models to fit most revolvers:

 

http://www.hksspeedloaders.com/SpeedloaderPage.html

 

1001707.jpg

 

The speedloader has little "teeth" that hold the cartridges in, and the silver knob turns counter-clockwise to deploy the teeth and hold in the cartridges (see arrows below):

 

1001704y.jpg

 

When the cartridges are loaded into the speedloader, you'll notice that they have a lot of "play", or wiggle alot.  This is what you WANT, because it will actually make it easier to load the firearm since you don't have to hit the back of the cylinder with the rounds precisely lined up with the chambers:

 

1001714j.jpg

 

Start the rounds into the cylinder, you don't have to push them all the way in.  Just far enough to guide them in, be sure to keep the muzzle pointed down somewhat so that the cartridges will drop into the cylinder. 

 

1001699.jpg

 

 

Once the cartridges are partially in, turn the knob clockwise to release them from the speedloader:

 

1001700.jpg

 

 

Then DROP THE SPEEDLOADER.  Practice dropping the speedloader.  You want to build "muscle memory" here, and in an emergency you don't want to be sliding the empty speedloader into your pocket instead of moving the revolver back into your right hand to fire.  Practice using the speedloader and you'll quickly become accustomed to it's use. 

 

Again, push the cylinder shut with your thumb, and your revolver is loaded and ready for use:

 

1001711.jpg

 

 

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Good job Bob thanks. Some leave one and sometimes two shells out so the hammer isnt resting on a live round. What is your thinking on this?

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Good job Bob thanks. Some leave one and sometimes two shells out so the hammer isnt resting on a live round. What is your thinking on this?

 

On modern double action revolvers it isn't necessary. The new Rugers and other brands have what is known as a "transfer bar" that moves up between the hammer and firing pin when the trigger is pulled.  Without the transfer bar in position, the hammer can't connect with the firing pin:

 

afire4.jpg

 

Smith & Wesson's revolvers have the "Hammer Block Safety".  The hammer block prevents the hammer from moving forward far enough for the firing pin to hit the cartridge.  In the first photo you see a cutaway of a S&W with the hammer in the uncocked position and the hammer block is highlighted in red.  When the hammer is down, the hammer block is in the up position, blocking the firing pin and hammer from moving forward:

 

afire5.jpg

 

In this second photo, the hammer is cocked and the hammer block has moved down out of the way of the hammer's forward movement unless pressure is removed from the trigger.  Then the hammer block would move up to prevent the firearm from discharging:

 

afire6.jpg

 

 

 

S&W used hammer-mounted firing pins until the last decade or so, and decided to start using frame-mounted firing pins.  They still use the same safety system, which means you can carry 6 (or depending upon the model, 7 or 8) rounds. 

 

When it comes to the older guns, like the Colt Peacemaker and it's clones, many of the new reproductions, the older model Ruger single-action revolvers, etc, the firing pin could easily contact the cartridge directly under the hammer.  It would be prudent to keep the chamber under the hammer empty, and indeed that was the practice in the Old West.  All of those "six shooters" were generally used as "five shooters" instead.  The old cap-and-ball revolvers were a bit easier, just don't place a cap on the nipple under the hammer (that's a whole new thread, folks).  Ruger offers a free conversion for the older model (pre-1973) single action revolvers, placing a transfer-bar safety in the older guns for free:

 

http://www.ruger.com/Firearms/PDF/InstructionManuals/36.pdf

 

Anyone unsure of their particular firearm should check with a qualified gunsmith.  If you have any doubts whatsoever, leave the chamber under the hammer and firing pin empty.

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The ammo shortage has eased considerably lately, and prices have even come down a bit.  I was able to get some Federal 115 grain JHP +P+ 9mm from Cheaper than Dirt (of all places to get a good deal lately!) for only $19.59/box of 50 yesterday.  This is great 9mm defense ammo at a super price.

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Ok, let's talk about semi-automatic handguns.  First of all, looking back at the definition of a semi-automatic we find that this could also be called an "auto-loader", which is an excellent description of how these guns work.  You'll also here these referred to as "automatics" or "auto pistols", but a true automatic is a firearm designed to fire multiple rounds per trigger pull.  A semi-auto fires one round for each pull of the trigger.  You'll also find that some people call semi-autos "pistols" while others call all handguns "pistols".  I'm of the latter school of thought, but to each his own.  But just note that if I say "pistol" I'm referring to a handgun, not a semi-auto in particular.

 

The first round must be loaded into the chamber manually, and then after the first shot the handgun will eject the empty casing and feed the next round from the magazine by itself.  There are a number of different operating systems such as tilting barre,l recoil operated, blowback, rotating barrel, etc.  Those aren't important at this time as this is just a primer on semi-automatics and their loading and use.  There isn't a way for me to cover the entire scope of semi-auto designs out there, but I will cover a few different design features that may be common to many designs.  I think this is the main reason I've dragged my feet so long in starting this section:  so much material to cover, so little time!  This is still a work in progress and I'm not happy with the photos I took last night.  Tonight I'll try again and have the wife take the pictures.

 

I will make two suggestions from the start:  1)  Read the manual that came with the gun, and if you don't have one contact the manufacturer and they will usually send one for free.  Many have the manuals in pdf form online.  2)  Get help from a qualified instructor if you're new to handguns or firearms in general.  Revolvers are generally easier to learn to use than semi-autos, but if you're new to either a reputable instructor can put you on the right path from the start. 

 

 

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Stoopit friggin' camera!!!   :curse:

 

Okay, no new photos so I have to try to write part of this up without them.  Right now, I'm just going to point out the different action types and I can swipe images from the 'net to do that.  There are several types of actions--double action (DA), double action only (DAO)--which are a type of DA pistol, single action (SA), and striker-fired (SF).  

 

Starting with double action handguns, the first shot with one of these works in much the same way as a revolver does:  squeezing the trigger cocks the hammer and drops it to fire the pistol.  Double action semi-autos come in a variety of types, many laid out in the same way.  Controls generally include a safety switch, slide release lever, magazine catch, and often a disassembly lever.  These are often located in generally the same area from one brand/type to another due to the shooting public's preferences.   A common type is the Beretta 92:

 

beretta92.jpg

 

.1  Disassembly lever

.2  Slide release lever

.3  Manual safety/decocker

.4  Magazine release

 

The Beretta's manual safety, like many types of DA autos, not only prevents a trigger pull from firing the pistol but also "decocks" the pistol.  This is a way of safely lowering the hammer if the gun is cocked or after a round has been chambered.   Pushing the safety "up" reveals the red dot that indicates that the safety is "off".   Some types have a "decock ONLY" type of safety lever, which lowers the hammer but DOES NOT prevent a trigger pull from firing the pistol.  The hammer could be lowered with your thumb, but it means actually pulling the trigger and if your thumb slips--bang!  Always remember, the best safety is your trigger finger being away from the trigger until you WANT the gun to go 'bang'.  

 

A Sig Sauer is a good example of a 'decock-only' type:

 

83_sig-p228.jpg

 

1.  Disassembly lever

2.  Decock lever

3.  Slide release

4.  Magazine release

 

When the decock lever is pressed down, the hammer lowers without firing the gun, but the pistol will then work like a DA revolver in that a trigger pull will raise and lower the hammer to fire the gun.  Afterwards the gun will cycle the slide and cock the hammer back for you.  The second shot will therefore have a much lighter trigger pull.  These pistols' actions--like most semi-autos like Berettas, S&W 3900 and 5900 series, Rugers, many others--are often called "double action/single action".  A double-action only (DAO) semi-auto will not leave the hammer cocked back after each shot, so the trigger pull is the same for each shot.  

 

A single action auto does not have an action that will allow the trigger to cock the hammer back.  Generally speaking the gun's hammer is cocked when the first round is chambered by cycling the slide.  It can also be cocked manually--pulling the hammer back with the thumb--but if your thumb slips off the hammer there is a danger of an accidental discharge.  Probably the best example of an SA pistol is the 1911A1:

 

1911a1.jpg

 

1.  Slide release

2.  Manual safety

3.  Magazine release

4.  Grip safety

 

When you load the first round into the chamber by inserting a loaded magazine and then cycling the slide, the hammer will stay back and the pistol is ready to fire.  You can then switch on the manual safety.  Now, many people are nervous about carrying a single action pistol with the hammer cocked and safety on--"cocked and locked" or "Condition One" as the saying goes.  If you aren't comfortable with the idea of carrying the pistol in this way, do NOT carry it with a loaded chamber.  Some advocate that a pistol such as this be carried in "Condition Two", in other words the pistol has a round chambered but then the hammer is lowered manually.  In this condition most SA pistols' safety switches don't function.  This is an accidental discharge waiting to happen!   Better to carry in Condition One or in Condition Three--empty chamber and uncocked.  At least in Condition One you have the manual safety, the grip safety--which prevents the trigger being pulled unless you are gripping the gun properly--and in many models a firing pin safety.  I've been using and carrying 1911-type handguns for over 20 years now, and I'm comfortable with Condition One.  Not everyone will be, so if you must use a 1911A1 type please don't ever consider Condition Two.

 

The manual safety switch on this pistol and many other SA types work in the opposite direction of the Beretta's.  Switching the safety upwards is "on" and downwards is "off".

 

One other type of control I would like to show you:  The "heel clip" type of magazine release.  This is used in many older types of auto, and may still be encountered on different pistols.  This next photo will show a Ruger MKII, a semi-auto .22 pistol:

 

Ruger_MK_II.jpg

 

1.  Slide release

2.  Manual safety

3.  Magazine release

4.  Disassembly lever

 

The heel-clip type magazine isn't as popular here in the US today, but was once quite common especially in European designs.  It's basically a spring loaded lever that clips over the bottom of the magazine to hold it in place.  The thumb-activated magazine release below the trigger guard is preferred by most because it can be operated by the same hand that holds the pistol whereas the heel-clip has to be operated by the other hand.  Not important in a target gun but it can slow down a reload in a combat pistol.

 

Striker-fired pistols include the Glock family of pistols:

 

Glock-19.gif

 

1.  Disassembly levers

2.  Slide release

3.  Magazine release

4.  Trigger safety

 

The slide has to be cycled to cock the "striker."  There is no external hammer as in the Beretta or 1911A1, the trigger releases the internal striker to fire the pistol.  As each shot is fired, the striker is partially cocked by the slide moving rearward and the action of the trigger finishes the firing sequence.  Rather than calling it 'DA' or 'DAO', Glock refers to it as "Safe Action".  The Glock has no manual safety, but the trigger has a lever mounted in the face that requires the user to place the finger in the right to squeeze the trigger.  This safety is the reason I strongly advise anyone who has a Glock or another similar striker-fired pistol to only carry it in a holster that completely encloses the trigger guard.  For that matter, I prefer that any holster covers the trigger guard of any type of handgun.  

 

Why would I take the time to go through each of these?  Mainly just because you never know what sort of firearm you may run across. Now, if you aren't sure how one functions you shouldn't mess around with it.  Nothing will get your attention faster than an accidental discharge.  But, if the occasion should rise that you do need that firearm to work or you need to know how to make it safe, a little basic knowledge could come in handy.  Again, the best thing to do is to see a qualified instructor and get some time at a range where you can rent some of these types.    If the camera's batteries are charged and ready this evening I'll pick this up with loading and working with semi-autos.

 

 

 

 

 

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A great thread KB, well done mate.

 

First off I am in the UK with our anti gun laws so really can’t add much to this thread but I do have some real world tactical shooting experience. First of all I want to echo your comment about pistol shooting but i want to make it a little stronger. Pistols are not toys, they are by far the most dangerous of all firearms in the wrong hands by the fact that they are small. Go to a range and watch people shooting pistols for the first time you will see the weapon being waved around all over the place even when they are told to keep the weapon pointing down range at all times. Because they are so small it is common to see people talking with the pistol in the same way some people talk with their hands. Moving their hands around whilst talking. Another problem with pistols are the fact it is easier to aim off the target. With a long rifle when you aim at the target it is quite hard to move the weapon of the target without realising.

 

To teach someone to shoot a long rifle to a high standard take 100s of rounds, to teach someone to shoot a pistol the same standard takes thousands of rounds. Safety is far more important too.  It is also extremely important to continually train with your pistol. A rifle is different; once you are proficient you can get away with not training so much. Although I have not shot a weapon in years I pretty much know I could out shoot most people on this forum with a rifle but my pistol shooting would be extremely average because I have not trained for so long.

 

Despite the number of people that have weapons in the US, generally the weapon skills demonstrated by many are extremely poor. I will go as far as saying I have seen some of the worst and most dangerous weapon skills in the States compared to the rest of the world. Saying that; I have also seen some of the best weapon skills in the States too.  It is so important to practice with your weapon, both with dry training and live fireing.

 

One thing I find very disturbing is that so many people that carry a weapon of any type is that they keep a round in the breach, it is even taught to people. This is the biggest cause of accidental shootings. People forget they have a round in the breach and don’t follow good safety drills.

 

I never carry a weapon with a round in the breach unless I am going into a know hostile engagement and then I have the safety on until I am going to take the shot. With basic training it is very easy to learn to cock a pistol as you draw and it does not slow you down at all.

 

Finally learn your NSP’s and practice them. Do your NSP’s every time you pick up a weapon and every time you put the weapon down. Make it so that you do your NSP’s automatically without thinking.

 

I have probably jumped ahead on what you are planning to post a little bit, sorry about that.

 

Again, great thread KB, I am looking forward to reading the rest of your posts, I’ll try not to put my penny in too often  ;)

 

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