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i guess you guys call them slingshots!  i love hunting with them and i rarely leave home without one! heres an unlucky critter with a catty made by my yanky buddy 'wildman':

 

DSC00928.jpg

 

thanks for looking.

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I have noticed that slingshots are used a lot for hunting in the UK, I've seen some videos where they have been employed very successfuly, I need to practice more with mine. So.., you have grey squirrels over there?

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yep millions of them! theyve near wiped out our indigenouse red squirell! make a fine meal too if you have a few!

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Oh..trust me I am well aware of what a meal they will make. Lol, I literaly cut my teeth on squirrel legs, it's great fried with some gravy, mashed potatoes, and some carrots and homemade biscuits..., probably not the kind of biscuits you're thinking though.

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We used to make our own using inner tubes. We got pretty good with them. Its mostly instinct shooting as sights are impossible. Finding the right sized stones became a problem but now a days you can buy ammo.

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That's some interesting news. Only tried them a few times and only when we were at Jim's and Clarrise's house when I was pretty young. Seems she would have been insulted if we didn't. Maybe Clarrise was from Kentucky...she was a little different (not in a bad way) than most of the women I knew. She was small but tough and very independant...,a lot like Lisa. Funny, they didn't even mention her recipe for broiling them.

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probably not! you guys sure do speak a funny english!

 

You have to remember..., we don't actually speak english here...., we started out as a melting pot of cultures and our language is a melting pot of several languages with english being the base and the primary. But what specificaly were you refering to...will try to clarify?

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You have to remember..., we don't actually speak english here...., we started out as a melting pot of cultures and our language is a melting pot of several languages with english being the base and the primary. But what specificaly were you refering to...will try to clarify?

"biscuits" A biscuit here  is a hard baked sweet or savoury product like a small, flat cake, which in North America may be called a "cookie" or "cracker". The term biscuit also applies to sandwich-type biscuits, where a layer of 'cream' or icing is sandwiched between two biscuits. In the UK, "cookie" is usually only used in the combination "chocolate chip cookie".

 

The British usage of the word biscuit was defined in the defence of a tax judgement found in favour of McVitie's and their product Jaffa Cakes which Her Majesty's Customs and Excise claimed was a biscuit and was therefore liable to value added tax - chocolate covered biscuits are liable to VAT, whilst chocolate covered cakes are not. The successful defence rested on the fact that "biscuits go soft when stale, whereas cakes go hard when stale".

 

In Britain, the digestive biscuit has a strong cultural identity as the traditional accompaniment to a cup of tea, and is regularly eaten as such. Many tea drinkers "dunk" their biscuits in tea, allowing them to absorb liquid and soften slightly before consumption.

 

Although there are many regional varieties,  "biscuit" is generally used to describe the sweet version. Sweet biscuits are commonly eaten as a snack and may contain chocolate, fruit, jam, nuts or even be used to sandwich other fillings.

 

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Here they are a baked bread made with flour (usualy self rising or add yeast or baking powder), salt, and levening.

 

They are usual a breakfast food and either have eggs, meat, cheese (or all three) sandwiched in, or have butter and jelly sandwiched in them

Homemadebuscuits.jpg

 

biscuits.jpg

 

 

They are often served with gravies

biscuits_and_gravy.jpg

 

Biscuits-and-gravy.jpg

 

 

But my favorite to make with fried game and mashed potatoes and gravy are what are called drop biscuits

Bropbiscuits.jpg

 

 

Now I am hungry again darn it.

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thats what we call scones! we have fruit ,cheese ,plain and drop scones! known as a cream tea theyre served with clotted cream and jam and a pot of tea!

cream-tea.jpg

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probably not! you guys sure do speak a funny english!

 

 

 

Even different parts of our own country speaks a funny english....

 

here we say:               eastern states say:

sack                                bag

pop                                soda

visitation                        viewing

sure                                 shore

those are just a few and no offense to them,,,,I think its kinda neat how different parts of the country talk.......... :whistle:

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thats what we call scones! we have fruit ,cheese ,plain and drop scones! known as a cream tea theyre served with clotted cream and jam and a pot of tea!

 

 

Clotted cream? Is that what we call butter, or cream cheese maybe?

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Clotted cream? Is that what we call butter, or cream cheese maybe?

 

Clotted cream is a thick yellow cream made by heating unpasteurized cow's milk and then leaving it in shallow pans for several hours. During this time, the cream content rises to the surface and forms 'clots'.

 

When clotted cream is not commercially available, a reasonable copy may be made by combining two parts whole milk with one part whipping (heavy) cream, heating at the very lowest possible heat for a couple of hours until a skin forms, leaving it undisturbed overnight, and then harvesting the skin and its underclots.

 

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Apparently it is not made at all in the US but I did find a way to buy it on line and a few recipes for Devonshire cream on line also. Now all I need is a source for fresh milk  :)

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Apparently it is not made at all in the US but I did find a way to buy it on line and a few recipes for Devonshire cream on line also. Now all I need is a source for fresh milk  :)

 

can you guys get what we call 'breakfast milk'? its sold in most supermarkets here,its a high fat/cream milk.

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can you guys get what we call 'breakfast milk'? its sold in most supermarkets here,its a high fat/cream milk.

 

Not that I am aware of, we can get Whole milk, 2% milk, 1% milk, skim milk, half and half, and whipping cream but it has all been pasturized and homoginized....fresh milk is hard to find..., but I may know someone who can help me in the next county, it's the cool time of year, should be fine.

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Guest smallgamehunter

breakfast cream would be what we call heavy cream here mate

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Guest smallgamehunter

or could possibly be buttermilk

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