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Supercharge Your Wool!

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I see many have turned to wool as a fabric of choice for the wilderness. Wool has many advantages for the woodsman. This natural, hard-wearing, warm, flame resistant material is especially appealing to the hardcore traditional and retro-modern ramblers. But did you know that most wool blankets and garments are working at about 60% of their capability? Yes, manufacturing processes and routine washings are robbing your precious wool of it's "life essence".......... Lanolin Oil.

 

Lanolin is an oil found in sheep's wool that helps wool shed water. It is removed when the wool is being cleaned and processed and rarely ever put back in. Restoring your wool's lanolin will condition the fibres and make your wool stronger and more waterproof. This is necessary for wool outerwear like hats, mittens, blankets, coats, shirts and pants.

 

Pure lanolin oil can be bought online and usually comes with directions.

 

A simple process of soaking your wool in a warm bucket of water mixed with pure lanolin oil will make a HUGE diference in performance.

 

You wool thank me for it... lol.

 

Rick

 

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Lanolin oil is great, it's used in everything from fabric conditioners, soaps and face creams, cosmetics and the list goes on but there is one major problem with it, a vast number of the population are allergic to it.

 

Many people with allergies, dermatitis, eczema and even asthma are often allergic to lanolin.

 

When I was a kid my mother thought I was allergic to wool but later found out that I was actually allergic to lanolin within the wool.  This is just something to be aware of if have any of the above conditions and was thinking of using lanolin oil on your clothing.

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YES!!!....... hadn't thought of that.... thanks Adi...... makes sure you're not allergic.... perhaps get a lanolin based moisturizer and test a spot on your wrist. They sell it in small tubes for nursing mothers.

 

 

Rick

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Guest blacksmith

you can use cooking oil we have done this for years just a cap full is all it takes

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you can use cooking oil we have done this for years just a cap full is all it takes

 

Great tip....... mmmmmmmh..... frenchfries.....

 

doesn't it go rancid?

 

 

 

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Lanolin oil  :yes:  that why Im itching all over after visiting my friend Lucy.   :thumbup:

 

 

 

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Guest blacksmith

Great tip....... mmmmmmmh..... frenchfries.....

 

doesn't it go rancid?

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

no I have not had that happen yet you use new oil in the water after the wash

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wow I never knew that thanks for the advice guys great stuff to know. I should tell my Mom she loves wool.

 

so who is Lucy is she a sheep.

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Great tip....... mmmmmmmh..... frenchfries.....

 

doesn't it go rancid?

 

 

 

 

Yes it does go rancid. Butter will go rancid the next day if you leave it out in your butter dish, on the counter. Crisco shortening (vegetable oil pumped with hydrogen, to stabilize molecular structure allowing it to have the plasticity we like it for, if we like it) takes a lot longer to go rancid. Cooking oil is similar to Crisco shortening, except it doesn't have that molecule the hydrogen gas provides.

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Guest blacksmith

it is not butter it is oil and no it will not go rancid it dries out it is not much oil this is something we have done for years and have not had it go rancid

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Butter - goes rancid the fastest

Crisco - takes the longest to go rancid

Cooking oil - eh, sort of in between.

 

Not a question of IF it goes rancid, but WHEN!

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http://www.answers.com/topic/fats-and-oils

 

Information talking about why fats/oils go rancid. Not sure if Lanolin oil will go rancid or not.

 

When I was younger, in Culinary school, I figured if the instructor took the time to study the information, 30 years prior to informing us of the facts, I should probably accept the information as fact - cross reference the info later, as needed, rather than argue.

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Guest blacksmith

OK if you think this way you do not know much aaron you are a cook so you know things like that but this something my family has done from before I was born back to 1908 that I know of so sorry but you are wrong  my family has been sheep herders before they came to the USA in 1908

 

 

this is if you do this in a kitchen not this do you put oil in a cast iron pan I do dose it go rancid no not for a long long time if it dose it is the same way you are not going to put a tub of butter on it that would be dum real dum

 

it is a every small amount of oil and it drys out like when it is put on wood 

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The question was if cooking oil goes rancid, and it does. I didn't think people would want to walk around wearing rancid oil in their wool shirts, that they care for in general. That is why I answered the question.

 

If you are allergic to Lanolin oil, I would find a substitute for Lanolin oil to use, that does not go rancid.

 

I answered this question assuming people are going to look for Lanolin oil, and buy that, and use that, rather than what else is readily available.

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Guest blacksmith

I am not going to fight you on this all oil can go rancid Lanolin to but I have a hat that I made 2007 and it has not gone

rancid and it was put up all summer so you say what you want it works for me

 

so maybe if you did not wash it for years it would

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I am not going to fight you on this all oil can go rancid Lanolin to but I have a hat that I made 2007 and it has not gone

rancid and it was put up all summer so you say what you want it works for me

 

so maybe if you did not wash it for years it would

 

So you agree, cooking oil DOES go rancid?  taunt12.gif

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Guest blacksmith

no because you need to wash you clothing more then one or two times a year  :naughty: or it may go rancid not that it will go rancid oil can dry out and that way it will not go rancid  :hugegrin:

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I leave my butter out all the time in a butter dish and It hasn't gone rancid yet. I'm not saying that it doesn't go rancid, just that it hasn't happened to me, sofar. My concern in using cooking oil is with wild animals. Bears especially. Wouldn't the smell attract them?

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Very difficult to tell if your butter is rancid, no harmful effects either, just a scientific fact for the most part, and an answer to a question.

 

Cooking oil attracting bears I never thought about. People up here use deep fat fryer oil from restaurants all the time to bait black bears with.  Course, thats oil with a strong smell of food in it.  But I suppose cooking oil in general could do it. As curious as black bears are, last thing you want to do is give them another reason to investigate your camp.

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Aaronak...

 

There is no question that cooking oil will go rancid in most cases. This is a different application..... much less and allowed to dry..... they have tanned hides in vegetable oil for centuries. many woodworkers use olive oil to finish their pieces. A hunk of beef will go rancid and smell.... but what happens when you slice it thin and lay it out to dry?

 

If Blacksmith was soaking his sweater in a vat of oil I'd be worried.... but he is not. A few spoonfulls, in a tub of warm water really spreads it out. The wool absorbes what it needs and the rest gets dried out.

 

Rick

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Rick, do you think that the type of weave matters?

 

For you Shrek..... I think I would go with a brunet, shoulder length, bangs, not too curly weave..... anything else would hide those beautiful cheekbones. (on your face).

 

Oh... wait....... fabric weave........... the performance of the fabric would be effected by weave but not the conditioning of the fibres.

 

 

 

Rick

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Aaronak...

 

There is no question that cooking oil will go rancid in most cases.

 

If Blacksmith was soaking his sweater in a vat of oil I'd be worried.... but he is not.

 

Rick

 

There was a question if cooking oil will go rancid, and I said it would.

 

 

 

 

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