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Road Trip........ WOOOOOOOOO HOOOOOOOO!!

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Aaaand I'm out:

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The trip was put on hold in Truro, Nova Scotia for about two hours to fix a cracked transmission fluid cooler. The origonal was bypassed with the addition of an external cooler and we were back in action.

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On into New Brunswick where we encountered a blinding blizzard through the entire province. Almost 10 inches of snow fell in the higher regions along our route:

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We travelled down across the border from St. Stephan, NB into Calais, Maine and on into Bangor where we spent the night. The next morning we got an early start and set the cruise control on 72 mph for a long trip down I-95:

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A timely rest stop provided a welcome respite from white line fever and an opportunity to change a diaper:

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We continued on through New Hampshire and finally to our first destination of Springfield Ma. Our first stop.... sushi!!  :thumbsup: :thumbsup:

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The next morning we set off to get some goodies. I packed up the wife and kiddie and drove to Greenfield, MA to a great wood lot where I used to get all my wood for carving paddles:

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My objective.... a sugar Maple burl:

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While there I met, oddly enough a guy who was there looking for burls so he could make, you guessed it..... knife handles!! We split the larger of the two burls which they kindly sawed in half while we waited:

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Here's my half:

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The cut side:

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I ended up leaving with a few additional odds and ends:

*Black block - Redwood burl

*Reddish/brown block - Chico Zapote

*Longer rectangular block(with dark waxed ends) - Cocobolo

*Top smaller board - Lacewood with wonderful, elongated figure

*Square middle bottom board - "Blister" Bubinga (amazing "blister" figure which is unusual for this species)

* Largest bottom board - American Black Walnut, 18 inch wide

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On the way back from Greenfield we stopped in Sunderland, MA to see if the recent ice storm had damaged the oldest/largest tree on the east coast. No damage!! This is a HUGE Sycamore that takes five people to stretch hand-to-hand to encircle:

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The next day we went a saw a few friends  at Springfield College - The Birthplace of Basketball and the original "College of the YMCA". This is "The Pueblo" at the college's "East Campus Outdoor Learning Center. It is, indeed, an authentic, hand built pueblo built in 1938 by a man named Wopeen - the future chief of an Native Southwestern Indian Tribe(I forget the specific tribe name). This is the only building of its kind this side of the Mississippi. This is one of the places I took Machine and his crew for a short tour.

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Inside the Pueble, also known as the "House of Seven Fires" due to its seven fireplaces are spectacular murals, all painted by Wopeen, and all carefully maintained over the years:

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This is a self-portrait of Wopeen in ceremonial dress:

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This image depicts the pueblo itself whith a learning tree growing out one end. The photo in the center is of Wopeen.

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This Totem Ploe was also carved by Wopeen and hangs adjacent to the huge central fireplace in the middle of the building:

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These designs are inscribed into the arched entrance to the pueblo:

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The pueblo also houses two, 25ft Old Town War Canoes that I restored several years ago for the college. They continue to use these canoes for special occasions and one four-day trip every year down a stretch of the Connecticut River:

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The lighter colored planks and ribs are several of the pieces I replaced in this canoe along with new stems, outwales, canvas, filler and paint, and three coats of varnish throughout.

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They were very nice and had this plack installed just below where the canoes hang:

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We also stopped for lunch right next to the Basketball Hall of Fame just down the road from the college:

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On our last night in Massachusetts we visited a long time friend at her house for dinner. This is a lady from whom Avery's middle name - Anne - has been taken. This past Christmas her husband passed away after a very short battle with Lukemia. He was an avid wood worker and he and I had struch up a great friendship. While there for dinner I was sent down to the basement workshop to look for any tools I wanted. I just took one.... a Tormek Supergrind 2000 with all the accessories for sharpening and honingh woodworking tools.

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She also wanted some help evaluating the enormous pipe collection her late husband had accululated.... well over 600 briar and meerschaum pipes!! Here are just a few:

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Alright.... that's about all for the first half of our trip.

Its off to the Adirondack Mountains in the next post.

 

 

 

 

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Wow Peter, those are some awesome pictures. The one of Avery and the Mrs is adorable. The oldest tree is incredible!. That's the most extensive pipe collection I have ever seen. I think of them all I like the three in the lower center of the last picture the best.

 

Looking forward to more pictures....and you doing your job as judge  :whistle:

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Looking forward to more pictures....and you doing your job as judge  :whistle:

 

I posted an update on my progress.

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Cool pics -  I thought Indians didn't like to have pictures of themselves fearing they'll loose their soul

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I posted an update on my progress.

 

Oh...sorry...I must have missed that  oops.gif . I'll be quiet and go read it now  :whistle:

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Cool pics -  I thought Indians didn't like to have pictures of themselves fearing they'll loose their soul

 

I'm no expert on that, but I'd expect there's be a whole lot of soul-less natives on this continent is that were the case.

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You know this is the first time you mentioned you took your wife    :mad:    :nop:    I just figured she had to work or somtin.  :unsure:

 

All great shots Peter and after a rocky start that would have un nerved me.  :D  it turned out to be a great trip. It must have taken forever to post these thank you.  :thumbup:  :kiss:  I lmao on the first two.  :woot:

 

 

Swede tip of the day> get the first picture downloaded and copied in image shack or who ever. Minimize it and open Windows note pad and paste them on it. Bring Image shack back up and repeat until you have all the pictures in the note pad. 

 

Close Image shack, copy all the links in the note pad and paste them all at once in the post.You can add comments in note pad as you go or add them later after pasting.    gen165.gif

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Wow, great pics BB! Thanks for the wood porn and the close up shots of the canoe.

 

About that Tormek (totally jealous!), does it have it's own motor? I saw the pulley wheel at the other end, it looked like you needed an external motor to run it?

 

 

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I love the pictures, BB!  Thank you for taking the time to download these for us!  They are wonderful! :hug:

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Ok.... The Dacks:

 

Avery seemed to be in a hurry to pack for this next leg of the trip:

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Packed up and ready to travel:

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We hit the road, but had to make a short pit stop to pick up a last few goodies:

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Its about a three hour drive from Springfield to Raquette Lake on the western Slope of the Adirondack Mountain range. We headed up the Mass Pike/New York State Throughway to Rt# 87 and headed north till we hit Lake George. Then northish again to our distination.

 

Along the way we drove by the State capital of Albany:

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Then along the shores of the upper Hudson River:

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Our first stop was to Great Camp Sagamore(aka: The Sagamore Intitute of the Adirondacks). http://www.greatcampsagamore.org/

This amazing place was built in 1897 by the railroad barron William Durrant who was the man who funded the completion of the eastern half of the transcontinental railroad. You will notice that all of the buildings are painted "oxide red", or as its locally known... Durrant Red, because it was the color used for all of the origional railroad worker's houses along the way. It was later sold (actually it was used to partially pay off a debt) to Alfred Vanderbuilt who established the camp as the premier "Great Camp" in the region. The camp had electricity 6 years before the city of Syracuse due to a rather ingeniously designed power plant which was constructed on the Sagamore Lake outflow 2 1/2 miles away from the camp through the woods.

 

Sagamore is now afforded the status and protection of a National Historic Landmark and is a privately run not-for-profit educational institution. What was once a 7200 acre estate used for hunting, fishing and entertaining of the New York and Philidelphia social elite is now a 26 acre "island of private property situated in the middle(honestly... surrounded on all sides) of the Blue Ridge Wilderness Area within the ADK Park. It is a 5 1/2 mile drive up a winding dirt road from the Town of Raquette Lake. Sagamore recieved special dispensation for the laws governing wilderness area protection so it could be saved from being bulldozed to the ground back in the early 70's.

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My wife and I worked there for three and four years, respectively, designing and running the camp's Outdoor Programs. Mind you... this is not a kid's summer camp. This is a place where you can go to take workshops/courses in ADK packbasket weaving, canoe and guideboat building, folk music, photography, environmental studies, silvaculture, bushcraft, and a range of other "traditional skills" of the period. You can also stay there for a weekend of rest and relaxation and maybe attend one of the amazing barn dances held every two weeks or so.

 

This is the head of the "Lake Trail with runs completly around the lake on which the camop is built.

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The Main Lodge is shown below. What looks like a HUGE log cabin is actually a standard ballon frame constructed building with Spruce log slabs tacked onto the outside. Interestingly, matching slabs from the same logs were place on the inside walls to perfectly complete the impression of being a log cabin. This lodge, and several of tghe opther buildings were initially lit using a piped gasoline vapour lighting system. Huge wooden tanks burried underground in front of the building help 800 gallons of gasoline and a series of baffles collected the vapours which were then transported inside the adjacent buildings and finally to a the individule light fixtures. There was never an explosion or fire!!

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Many of the buildings are sheathed with White Cedar bark. There are several reasons for using this material: It is moderately fire and mildew retardant, it maintains the "rustic" look so much desired by the period owners of the camp, its locally harvested saving on time, and energy, but mostly it plays with light ansd shadow. The camp owners were art lovers. They loved the work of the Hudson Valley Artists who were expert at depicting light and shadow in their work. At various times of day... in certain light conditions, the cedar bark and the exposed poles on the outside of the buildings created extrordinary textural patterns which are really a delight to see.

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This is Alfred's cabin.... built for Alfred Vanderbuilt when he was 16 years old. Alfred still visits Sagamore and is a great guy. I once shared a 100 year old bottle of scotch with him and 5 other "gentleman" who were guests at the camp. We drank the scotch out of dixie cups!!

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This is Gloria's cabin... built for Gloria Vanderbuilt when she was 16 years old.

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This shot shows the "Playhouse" in the front, and the bowling alley in the rear. The Playhouse was actually designed and used as a sort of casino with card table, roulette table, ping pong table, billiards table, and various other gaming pieses and seating..... all custome made. There are still the origonal 50 some odd stuffed animals adorning the walls and rafters inside. There was also (now now longer there) two HUGE elephant tusks framing the giant fireplace and a stuffed Alligator standing on its tail holding a tray of ping pong balls...... Honest!!

 

The bowling alley is a one of a kind in the world!! It was constructed in the late 60's by Brunswick & Co (the bowling ball people). The two maple wood lanes sit atop a six foot thick slab of concrete in order to defeat the forces of seasonal freeze and thaw from warping the lanes. There is also a patented "Loop D' Loop ball return system which is gravity activated. It still works to this day and the bowling alley is also still used. Origonally, there was a set of 12 hand carved ebony bowling balls  and two sets of maple pins used by the Vanderbuilts. Today normal balls and pins are used, but there is no bowling after dark as it sounds like thunder when a ball strikes the pins!!

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This is the "Root Celler with it 4 foot thick walls of earth ansd sawdust, and its three layered roof of earth, sawdust, and foot-thick cedar beams. To this day the inside temp remains at 40 degrees throughout the year.

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This is the Blacksmith Shop....

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...and the inside. The anvil on the left sits atop a charred birch log which itself sits on bedrock 8 feet below ground level. This reduces the vibration which would otherwise shake the building apart in no time. It is still used for workshops. I have a steel striker that I made in this shop about 8 years ago.

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This lean-to was built in 1949 and still has the original hollowed-out cedar log as its rain gutter along the front edge of the roof. It sleep about 10 people. back in the day the floor would have been layered with spruce and cedar boughs and thick wool blankets atop of which the guests would sleep. The scent from this preperation helped keep away the healthy population of black flies and mosquitos. The fire pit in front of the lean-to can easily fit a plie of 6 foot logs.

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This is one of the four independent ice houses, meaning they are not connected to another building. There is a huge ice house connected to the main dinning room kitchen.

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We took a short hike along the previously mentioned Lake Trail to an outcrop of rock along the shoreline. Avery loved this little spot which I used to paddle to every morning where I'd sit in peace and quiet and have my coffee befor beginning my day.

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The lake shore is lined with White Cedar. If you look closely you can see the near perfectly line along the bottom edge of these trees. Can anyone guess what causes this perfectly straight line?

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This is one of many vernal pools in the area. This one already had globs of frog's eggs sitting in the water:

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That's our visit to the Dacks.

The next post will be our lonnnnnng trip back through the Adirondack High Peaks, the Green Mountains, the White Mountains, the foot hills of Maine, and finally back into Canada and home.

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About that Tormek (totally jealous!), does it have it's own motor? I saw the pulley wheel at the other end, it looked like you needed an external motor to run it?

 

 

Yes, it has a single speed, single phaze motor. This thing weighs about 50 lbs and comes with 8 different sharpening jigs that fit every concievable edged tool including an axe, sythe, cabinate scraper, or scissors...... incredible piece of machinery!! It also comes with its own tube of honing compound, a diamond face-trueing tool ,and stone refacing block! I also picked up the "big three" buffing compounds, two grades of honing stones, and two 1-lb blocks of carnuba wax.

 

I've got it all now!!

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Thats as high as the moose can reach.   :smoke:

 

You've got the right idea. Its actually deer. Its known as a "browse line" and it is trimmed every winter when the deer walk out on the ice and browse the Cedar twigs when no other food source is available due to the deep snow.

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Swede - Loggers in that region will tell you that they can fell a White Cedar and deer will be browsing the twigs befor they can take off all the limbs!! Its actually a very nutritious food source and they do seem to think its tasty.

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If you have ever come into contact to multiflower rose (its some of the most nasty hooked thorn stuff your can imagine) rips your skin and clothes off. They actually eat the tips off thorns and all around here.

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Guest smallgamehunter

If you have ever come into contact to multiflower rose (its some of the most nasty hooked thorn stuff your can imagine) rips your skin and clothes off. They actually eat the tips off thorns and all around here.

them thorns aint no joke i lost a good pair of gloves and jeans to them thorns

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Guest blacksmith

wow fun trip looks like you had a grate time  :dribble:  blacksmith shop    :dribble:

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Ashley and I are totally enchanted with the pics, BB.  We love the lodges!  Avery is the luckiest little girl in the whole world to have you and Sue as parents! :hug:

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