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Guest smallgamehunter

yes

 

basicly the heavy intermidate cold  bag goes inside the light patrol bag and they snap together then u snap that into the goretex bivy cover

mod3sleep.jpg

 

in this pic the black intermidate cold sleeping bag snaps inside the green patrol one and that snaps inside the camo bivy cover

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Ive got two carry bags. I think they call them compression bags. One black and one camo. Other wise yours is just like the one I got.

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I think Ill take a hospital urinal with me when I get in that thing so I dont have to get back back out in the middle of the night.  :yes:

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Guest smallgamehunter

fair warning it gets extremely cold if u leave it laying open when u get out of it

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I can see now how the bivy bag is good for sub zero survival. By the time I wrestled the heavy bag inside the patrol bag and snapped it together than stuffed the two bags inside the gortex cover and snapped it together I was soaked with sweat.  gen165.gif    doh.gif  and I havent even started trying to  stuff the whole thing inside of the travel bag.    :nono:    :help:

 

Im tellin you I hope I dont ever have to perform that task in sub zero temps.  :sad:

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Guest smallgamehunter

thats why i store mine put together in the compression bag

 

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With Sharens help we managed to get the thing in the bag. You can smash it and cinch up the straps and repeat until its a pretty small.  gen165.gif

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Guest smallgamehunter

yea it keeps u warm no matter how cold it is.

 

i have used in with a -5 windchill and stayed perfectly warm

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Guest smallgamehunter

thats a diffrent type of compression sack its newer issue

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Winter Water

 

1) Do not eat snow! It takes an incredible amount of energy to transfer water from one state to another (solid to liquid). You are burning up too many calories to do this which can quickly lead to hypothermia.

 

2) Water may be obtained by digging a hole in frozen lakes or streams where there is running water beneath the ice. Be careful about falling in. Remember, in most cases water will need to be purified from giardia and other bacteriological contaminants (see below).

 

3) Snow can be melted on a fire or stove to make water. It should be clean snow, no yellow (urine) or pink (bacterial growth). Because it takes so much energy to convert from one state to another you should have some water in the bottom of your container. Heat this water up and add snow to it slowly so it turns to slush and then water. This is much more efficient. If you dump in straight snow, you will only burn the bottom of your container and not make any water. By volume it takes about 10 quarts of snow to make 1 quart of water. Snow does not need purification.

 

4) Winter Solar Water Collector - In a spot that will remain sunny for several hours, dig out a depression in the snow about 2 feet across and 1 foot deep. If possible, line this depression with a foam pad or other insulation (not essential but it speeds the process). Then spread a dark plastic bag (trashbag) over the depression forming a shallow dish pan. All over the raised margins pack clean snow. Drawn by the dark plastic the sun's energy will melt the snow and water will collect in the depression.

 

Solar Water Collector

snowh20.gif

5) Water in a pot can be stored overnight by placing the pot lid on and burying the pot under a foot of snow. Snow is such a good insulator that it will keep the water from completely freezing even in sub-zero temperatures.

 

6) Personal Water - You should have a water bottle with a wide mouth, otherwise the opening will easily freeze up. During the day you should carry at least one bottle next to your body (usually with a shoulder strap arrangement). Your body heat will keep it from freezing and the bottle is handy to rehydrate yourself throughout the day. Insulated water bottle holders are available for this. Other bottles can be kept upside down in an insulated container (sock etc.) preferably in an outside pocket on your pack. Being upside down will keep the mouth of the bottle from freezing. Keep in mind that the lid must be on tightly or water will leak all over the place. A cold water bottle may have ice crystals in the threads. As the bottle heats up from body temperature the ice may melt causing the cap to loosen also the lid may expand with heat causing leakage. At night keep your water bottles in your sleeping bag to prevent them from freezing.

 

7) Getting Water - sometimes filling pots and water bottles from a stream or lake is a major expedition in itself. Make sure that the area you plan to get water from is secure. Avoid steep banks that might lead to a plunge and make sure any ice is sufficiently stable to hold your weight. Also make sure you don't get your mittens soaked with icy water. A loop of string tied tightly around the water bottle neck will allow you to lower a bottle in by hand or with a ski pole or ice axe. Don't trust pot grips on a large pot, with mittens you can lose your grip and your pot. Fill the pot up part way and then use a water bottle to top it off. Mark the area so you can find it next time.

 

8) Water purification - keep in mind that water gotten from streams in the winter time may have bacteriological or other contaminants. You should check with local rangers about any water problems before going in. If the water does need to be purified, the best methods during the winter are either:

 

  1. Boiling - for at least 3-5 minutes (add 1 minute for every 1,000 feet above sea level so that at 10,000 feet you are boiling for 15 minutes). This is the best method in winter situations.

  2. Less Effective Methods:

          * Filtration- using a filtration pump system such as the PUR, First Need, or the Katadyn is not recommended in subfreezing temperatures. Keep in mind that the water in filters can freeze preventing them from working. Also, as the water freezes, it expands and may crack the filter, rendering it inoperable or even worse transmitting harmful microorganisms into your system. For these reasons, filters should be used with great caution in the winter. Be careful of inferior filters which do not strain out many organisms.

          * Chemical treatments (iodination or chlorination) are not recommended because they become ineffective at low temperatures. Only use these methods if the water has been preheated to about 60o Fahrenheit.

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i too am an avid winter camper.(as you can tell from my profile pic) and swede you have really posted a lot of exelent info. i just wanted to add a couple small things ive learned over the years. i may have missed on your post so forgive me if you already stated them. at night always turn you water bottle upside down, as it freezes it will freeze from the top down leaving you water instead of ice when you turn it right side up. also, i love the military gear (i have the goetex bivy bags)  ive always taken my 40 deg. thinsulate mummy bag and put it inside my 0 degree mummy bag and then placed it inside my bivy cover. i have slept so warm in -30 winter weather with a windchill of -55 that i had to take off my long johns so i wouldnt sweat to much. then i stuff my cloths into the bivy so they are relativily warm  (and help insulate me, especially around my feet, blood dosnt flow so good anymore)when i put them on in the morning. and (i know this might gross some people out) but i use a widemouth bottle very carefully to pee in so i dont have to get out of my nice warm sleeping bag in the middle of the night. and by taking that same bottle(with the lid really tight!) and put it down by my feet for a nice warm foot box and a good nights sleep.  Swede, your knowledge(and your google speed) are impressive. razor

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razor, I want to try some winter camping this year too.  It doesn't get that cold here, but for a Southern woman, anything below 40*F feels more like - 40*F!  :grin:

 

When my daughter and I went camping last spring, it went down to 38*F that night.  Both of us were sleeping on insulated air mattresses and had big quilts thrown over our sleeping bags, but we were still freezing.  Our sleeping bags were supposed to be good to +35*F, but I think it's more like +45*F. 

 

I'm going to invest in a good winter sleeping bag.  I'll take your advice and put my Ultralamina +35 inside the winter sleeping bag.  That should keep me toasty! 

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I can see now how the bivy bag is good for sub zero survival. By the time I wrestled the heavy bag inside the patrol bag and snapped it together than stuffed the two bags inside the gortex cover and snapped it together I was soaked with sweat.  gen165.gif    doh.gif  and I havent even started trying to  stuff the whole thing inside of the travel bag.    :nono:    :help:

 

Im tellin you I hope I dont ever have to perform that task in sub zero temps.  :sad:

 

:rofl:  You are SO funny!  :woot:

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Holly,was your air matresses the large inflatable ones or the small 1 or 2 inch thick thermarest self inflating mats? Watcher is right, if the only thing below you is air and the volume is to great to heat up with your boddy heat it will draw the warmth right out of you. an insulated thermarest or a closed cell camp mat(the blue ones at wall mart) are great for keeping you warm, even if they arnt thick enugh to make you comfortable. i have used my blue wal-mart mat in my hammock at about 25-28 deg. and stayed warm.

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Holly, this is just a guess, but I think you may have been cold because you didn't have anything betweek your bodies and the air mattress. Those things can suck the heat right out of you.

 

That's probably what happened.  :yes:  I do have a thin insulated mat somewhere in one of my bug out bags.  If I can find it, I'll try putting that between me and the air mattress.

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blacksmith and I were just talkin bout winter camping/hiking and I'm thinking about all the cold, wet snow, dry air,  I thought he was crazy, and I've lived in alaska all my life. but now I think he's gunna be scared when he read this. cause I wanna go winter camping!  =)

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blacksmith and I were just talkin bout winter camping/hiking and I'm thinking about all the cold, wet snow, dry air,  I thought he was crazy, and I've lived in alaska all my life. but now I think he's gunna be scared when he read this. cause I wanna go winter camping!   =)

 

You guys could come up here and camp. I'll be taking a artic survival course in January.

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