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Bushman5

Safety Alert!

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Bushman - is that the same whistle you show in your chest rig pictures?  Pretty bad when someone can't even make a whistle that works.  Thanks for the info.

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hmmm interesting i have used these whistles for years and they work very well, they give of a nice lower frequency sound than other whistles such as the fox and storm. A very important factor as low frequency sounds travel far further than high frequency sounds.

 

One thing about many whistles in that people have the habit of blowing to hard.

 

I will endeavor to contact Perry and see if they have had any issues.

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Bushman - is that the same whistle you show in your chest rig pictures?  Pretty bad when someone can't even make a whistle that works.  Thanks for the info.

 

yes, it has since been replaced by my Fox40.

 

Adi, try using the whistle i warned about in dense forest, or in areas of high noise (marine environment, industrial areas etc). Low frequency whistles that do not carry more than 20 feet are a life safety issue.  There is a reason rescue whistles are extremely high pitched.

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I bag to differ high frequency whistles make you ears bleed but because of the short wave length they do not travel far and the sound is easily rebounded of objects. Low frequency has a longer wave length so travels further and has more penetration through obstructions.

 

It is this fact that long wave radio is used to broadcast over long distances and why fog horns are such a low frequency.

 

Here are some points i made on another forum, Equipped to Survive.

 

Interesting, I have always wondered why survival whistles have become so high pitched over resent years. Especially as it has been know for around 100 years that low pitched sound travels a lot further than high pitched.

 

This was shown in a very practical test when researching the improvements of nautical sound signals and foghorns. I don't remember the chaps name but he had a piano placed on a beach and different notes played whilst he sat in a rowing boat seeing which note was heard the furthest. He reported that the low notes could be heard the furthest and this was adopted for use in foghorns.

 

Although sound travels better in a moist atmosphere, fog is to dense so absorbs sounds, especially high pitched sounds.

 

I have lived by the sea all my life and within hearing distance of foghorns including the Portsmouth harbour entrance marker horn and the Bristol Channel navigation horn which can be heard at 46 mile minimum distance. Just because it is foggy it does mean it is relatively quiet, the sound is absorbed so it is perceived as being quieter, the foghorn has to be able to cut through that effect.

 

If you read the article and other articles about sound waves you will understand that long sound waves travel around and often through obstacles far better than short sound waves this point to the fact that low frequency sound is less disturbed and distorted by the environment than high frequency sound allowing it to travel further. This can be heard on wide band radio.

 

I recognise that to produce low frequency sound you need a larger chamber than high frequency sound. My point is manufacturers are kidding themselves by making louder whistles with higher frequency sounds instead of increasing the efficiency of lower frequency whistles. The fact is the manufactures are going against hard scientific fact and misleading people with their sales pitch in the process.

 

My original post was reflecting on why manufacturers feel the need to do this. the reason is the average person does not understand the process of sound so they perceive that a loud high pitched ear bleeding sound is more effective when they blow a whistle than one with a lower pitched sound, using our own failings in hearing to mislead use, probably through the lack of understanding, of which is the best sound.

 

A well researched and engineered whistle at 70dB would be far better than one at 105dB. This is borne out by the human voice compared to the storm whistle.

 

In the jungle a whistle is next to useless. The best way to communicate over long distance is to drum on the buttress of the silk cotton tree. This gives of a deep low frequency sound that cuts through the jungle for quite considerable distances.

 

Another problem with high frequency sound is because it has such a short wavelength it is reflected of of obstacles a lot more so although it might stand out over other noises a little bit better it is a lot harder to determine the direction it comes from. we experience this when we first hear emergency vehicle sirens.

 

The thread

http://forums.equipped.org/ubbthreads.php?ubb=showflat&Number=186297&page=1

 

Bushman I see your friend had a problem, which is not great. I also understand you test 6 other whistles that had a problem. There maybe an issue with this whistle or that batch. i have to say if you blow to hard you can have a problem with this whistle but on the whole it works. It is the standard whistle on most life jackets and has been for many years. It has been used successfully many many times.

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Ok i thought perry whistles were manufactured by Cosalt now a days but I am wrong.

 

Bushman is there a company name on the whistle?

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Adi, it is called the Scotty whistle, made by Perry Co. The tone itself is pleasing, reminds me of the ol English bobbies tooting their whistles. But it simply does not carry in the woods (in my area, YMMV) like a Fox 40 or Storm. 

 

interesting article, thanks for the link

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