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antagonizer

knapping points

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I know there was a section somewhere that we talked about knapping and such, but I thought I'd start a different one around here. The reason being, that I feel that there is a difference between knapping for decorative creation, and knapping for practical use. More often than not, my points are strictly decorative, but these are not.

 

In Ontario, it's legal to spear fish, provided you're at least 100 feet off shore and you restrict yourself to certain species. This generally means that the only way you'll catch anything is ice fishing with a spear and lure.

 

Here's a couple of my 'lithic' spears. The first one is knapped obsidian in an antler plug and glued with birch resin. The cord is deer hide and the shaft is hickory.  It can be used like a hand thrown spear, or with an atlatl handle.

 

The second spear is another piece of hickory, but this time the barb is carved from a deer leg bone, tied with sinew and glued with birch resin.  I didn't take any pics of the other end but this particular one is fletched like an atlatl dart for more range than the first one.

 

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Good question Bob. Problem I have is that when I've got my head into it I lose all track of time.  I'm sure Swede can confirm that.  Making the barb is really no different than any other point in that you're just flaking away material till you get your shape.

 

In my effort to make more, 'practical' points than I normally do, I even made a few fish hooks. Not that my arrow heads aren't practical, but traditionally arrowheads and knife blades are I ever see. The first ones were out of obsidian, but they were far to brittle so I switched to material that wasn't heat treated which seemed to work a lot better. I'll get pics up as soon as I can figure out where I put the hooks.

 

I'm also working on different shapes like birds and animals. With the obsidian it's much easier to do, but I haven't really made anything yet that's 'show' worthy.

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Thats correct Ant when your working a piece it takes 100% concentration. I have been soaked with sweat after working a good piece as one false move and all you have is another chip on the table. After you work flint or what ever your using you picture the point and make it come out of the rock. Its hard to describe. Sometimes the effort as in pressure flaking can be described as a force of will against the stone ie a concentration of mind and body.

 

Actually you can over think the process just do it. It can be exhausting some times. Rarely have I ever made several pieces in one day.

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