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A fun little plinker

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I think I saw some guy carrying one of these at the tea party rally in Washington today.  :dontgetit:

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I think I saw some guy carrying one of these at the tea party rally in Washington today.  :dontgetit:

 

Yeah, I took the day off from work to go....

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In its day the .40-90 Sharps (Necked) was a popular cartridge both for hunting and target shooting. It is perhaps not widely realized that Sharps made target rifles as well as hunting rifles, and the company was very successful in match competition. Their match successes eventually resulted in the word "sharpshooter" (contracted from "Sharps shooter") generically meaning a good shot.

 

Introduced in 1873, the .40-90 used a rimmed, bottleneck case 2 5/8" long. The base diameter of this case was .506", the shoulder diameter was .500", and the neck diameter was .435" Bullet diameter was .403". The cartridge overall length (COL) was 3.44".

 

The .40-90 and .40-100 (Necked) were the same cartridge with different powder charges and bullets. Period .40-90 factory loads drove a 370 grain lead bullet at a MV of 1475 fps and ME of 1800 ft. lbs. This was the big game load.

 

The .40-100 was an "Express" load, which in those days meant "high velocity." It used a lighter 190 grain hollow point bullet in front of extra powder to achieve a higher MV at the expense of penetration on large game.

 

The Civil War was the field test for massive bullet sizes. The M1842 Harpers Ferry Smooth Bore Musket Dated 1852 .69 caliber was one of the muskets used in battles. Reports of soldiers being blown out of their shoes was common and their uniforms split and torn off from the impact. The Civil War produced many amputees as fixing the damage to limbs was unthinkable.

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I'd rather be on the receiving end than the giving end, at least the "hurt" would be over much quicker!

 

LOL true

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Holy crap. That is something when you need a spotter to shoot the darn thing.  I would love to see the impact of the shell.  Maybe the guys from Mythbusters could get that on their high speed.

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I dont know why they need a spotter, it must be like watching a tennis ball going down range.

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I sent this link to a guy here at my office and he told me stories of something called a "punt" gun. Look it up on google, pretty interesting subject I have never heard of before.

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Oh the wonders of Punt guns, they are beasts. They are attached to punts (more modern ones look like large kayaks) and used for duck hunting. The harbour i live next to is famous for the old use of punt guns back in the day.

 

The hunter lays inside the punt on his stomach and paddles it with two hand oars, he has to position the punt with the birds to take the shot, which takes some skill trying to work with the tide.  

 

http://rowingforpleasure.blogspot.com/2010/01/punt-gunning-in-chichester-harbour.html

 

http://gallery.puntgunner.co.uk/chichester-harbour

 

A nice pic on the last page of this PDF

http://www.wildfowling.com/SCFsp01.pdf

 

 

 

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I was thinking of a film of punt gunning, just found part of it on Youtube

 

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