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Jemarque1

Name the survival tip you heard one to many times

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Guest smallgamehunter

well when i said older i was goin from my point of view.

 

Women are like fine wine they get better with age

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Small game dont try to blow smoke up her butt it aint worth it. ~Taken if her legs were stickin out the end of the tent the bears would get her first.

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Small game dont try to blow smoke up her butt it aint worth it. ~Taken if her legs were stickin out the end of the tent the bears would get her first.

 

WTF ............. is WRONG with YOU?   you do NOT know me.

 

do NOT act like you do.

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red headed older woman i never met toting a machete

 

Hey!  I resemble that remark! :hugegrin:

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Dont suck the poison out of a snake bite! Everytime I hear this I think there is no worry of me attempting that. :disgust:

 

LOL! That reminds me of the story about two guys out hiking and his friend sits down on a rock and gets bit by a rattle snake on the butt. His friend goes to seek help and runs into an EMT on the trail and the EMT says he has to suck out the poison. So his friend runs back to the one that got bit and the victim says "Well, what did the dr. say?" His friend replies.....

 

"You're gonna die."

 

 

The tip I've heard WAY too many times...."Stay Put."

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Mine's the opposite of Rocky's, "climb to the highest point you can so you can see where you are".  If you have to travel, travel downhill.  Downhill usually leads to water or people.    If you are in the area of Death Valley completely ignore that advice.  :dead:

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"Don't eat snow".  There's no end to the stupidity in that one. I guess it goes with the "you sweat you die" one since eating snow can reduce your temp. preventing sweating, mind you another way to cure sweat is with a quick, 5 minute strip down. Nothing better than naked in the wild.lol 

 

There's no absolutes in nature and trying to make hard and fast rules can get you killed. Most all 'mantras' annoy the hell out of me.

 

 

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It's red on yellow kills a fellow, red on black venom lack.

 

 

 

I've heard; "Red on yellow kill a fellow, red on black can pet 'em on the back"

 

            "Red on yellow kill a fellow, red on black friend of Jack"

           

            "Red on yellow kill a fellow, red on black venom it lacks"

 

 

 

Again i believe thats another quote you have wrong.  "Its feed a cold, starve cancer."

 

 

I've heard "feed a cold, starve a fever" all my life...and I'm 44, never once have I heard "feed a cold, starve cancer"

 

There are a million and two colloquial sayings in this country with variations on pretty much all of them from region to region. I think telling someone theirs is wrong simply because it differs from the one you're familiar with is...to put it nicely... poor form. Especially when someone is taking the time to give some valuable information.

 

 

Taken, the way it was explained to me by my grandmother is that to feed a cold starves a fever by giving your body strength to fight.

 

.

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Antagonizer, the correct saying is "Don't eat the YELLOW snow".  :hugegrin:

 

We all know why that's good advice  :)

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My favorite line is "Tell someone where you are going." So if you get lost somebody will magically know this?

You should tell someone when you expect to get back and from where. Oh, and make sure you tell somebody who doesn't get arrested on a regular basis.

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Maybe not a survival tip, but posted at entrance to all NPs, and people always want to tell prospective campers:

 

DON'T FEED THE BEARS!

 

Just got tired of hearing it...figured most of the people that actually need that little tidbit are the sort to do something far sillier/stupider than feeding the bears...(like my ex wife that one day wiped her bottom with a huge handful of 3 leaf shrubs growing along the edge of a picnic area).

 

 

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Okay, in a survival situation - when learning land nav in the service we were told at least thirty times a day to trust our compass, trust our map, and

 

NEVER, EVER, EVER, USE TERRAIN ASSOCIATION TO ORIENT YOURSELF!!!!!!!

 

I'll keep my own counsel for now as to whether or not I consider that to be good advice, but I sure got absolutely sick and tired of hearing it.  When I went to PLDC several years later as a buck sergeant, I got to hear it again for what seemed like weeks on end.

 

Steve

 

 

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Can you explain Terrain Association please, I have not heard that term before. I have my own idea of what it means but not 100% sure.

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I'm not positive but i think its when you just compare topography(hills, Vally's, mountains, lakes) and vegetation(open fields, woodlands etc.) and orient your map that way. without the compass, but i could be way wrong. hope that helps

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Just tell me you might have to eat deer eyeballs and squeeze piss out of elephant poop to survive. You dont have to show me.  :glare:

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Rules of three

3 minutes without oxygen

3 hours without some sort of shelter

3 days without water

3 weeks without food

3 months before you go insane

 

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Okay, in a survival situation - when learning land nav in the service we were told at least thirty times a day to trust our compass, trust our map, and

 

NEVER, EVER, EVER, USE TERRAIN ASSOCIATION TO ORIENT YOURSELF!!!!!!!

 

I'll keep my own counsel for now as to whether or not I consider that to be good advice, but I sure got absolutely sick and tired of hearing it.  When I went to PLDC several years later as a buck sergeant, I got to hear it again for what seemed like weeks on end.

 

Steve

 

 

 

Yeah that is what they taught me as well and I know how fun PLDC was...LOL. 

 

I would say on flat land that is good advice and still is, but when I compete in ROGAINE events I really do not use a compass except to validate at times where I am at.  I usually terrain associate the entire time as the terrain is adequate to let me know exactly where I am located.

 

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Flat is exactly what I found in the Manitoba and Saskatchewan wildnerness. The only changes to the forest is groves of popular spread through out the area. Popular will grow taller then jack pines and spruce. Otherwise there is no way of seeing far enough ahead to see a land reference.  Since Im not familiar with triangulation so I used a road to work off of. I knew the road ran lets say north and south and I left the road going west then I knew if I went east I couldnt miss it. I may not know where I ended up back on the road but at least I was on the road and not lost.

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