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what five would you bring?

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I'm with you on that one. While I understand the attraction to people wanting to 'get out there' with as little gear as possible to try and test their survival abilities, I myself would never do it. Why not just take your normal hiking gear and then try and use only your five designated items? At least then you have backup supplies to prevent it from turning into a real survival situation.

 

Words of wisdom my friend.

 

I get enough of the minimalist thing when I am teaching it here <a href=http://southeastwilderness.webstarts.com>s.e.wilderness.com</a> But I also teach against an intentional minimalist approach other than training for an incident. As you said it's easy to test yourself...but still better to be prepared for contingencies that have a nasty habit of occurring.

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Words of wisdom my friend.

 

I get enough of the minimalist thing when I am teaching it here <a href=http://southeastwilderness.webstarts.com>s.e.wilderness.com</a> But I also teach against an intentional minimalist approach other than training for an incident. As you said it's easy to test yourself...but still better to be prepared for contingencies that have a nasty habit of occurring.

 

If you've ever seen how full my backpack is, you'd think I was the most unlikely person to preach minimalism, however, more often than not, the backpack ends up stowed in my closet, while I bring my less bulky haversack.  I'm a minimalist simply out of laziness, and ironically it's served me well. Like a person who's never seen a TV, I don't even miss all of the extra junk, (which is exactly what it is...junk). Beyond the 5 items mentioned above, what else do you really need? I've stomped around the boreal my whole life, disappearing for a month at a time with little more than a knife, a steel, a bedroll, the fly off of my tent in case it rains, and the first 24 hours worth of food.

 

If you don't have it, trust me, you won't miss it.

If you want to come out my neck of the woods, I can show you a lake in northern Ontario so full of rainbow trout, you can catch and dry enough, in one day to last you 2 weeks,  the shoreline is peppered with wild raspberry, blueberries, and the surrounding forest is loaded with apple trees. It's a secret tho, so you'd have to come blindfolded. lol

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If you want to come out my neck of the woods, I can show you a lake in northern Ontario so full of rainbow trout, you can catch and dry enough, in one day to last you 2 weeks,  the shoreline is peppered with wild raspberry, blueberries, and the surrounding forest is loaded with apple trees. It's a secret tho, so you'd have to come blindfolded. lol

 

Be careful, I may actually take you up on that offer.

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.....Beyond the 5 items mentioned above, what else do you really need?

 

Beyond the five items I posted last  :) ? My first aid kit and my fishing/trapping kit.

 

What's bad is I know how things can go...will be prepared for it, have everything in the truck, and then sometimes get out to snap a few photos and then just wander off a few miles distractedly taking pictures leaving everything but a knife and ferro rod, even my water bottle, in the truck.

 

 

Be careful, I may actually take you up on that offer.

 

I was thinking the same thing lol.

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I was just being a little sarcastic...I spent a few years with the only constants being a knife, my clothes, a lighter, and my wits.

 

The beauty about using my wits is it only counts as half an item :)

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I've brought a few people up there (won't name the lake, sorry) and they've all been dumbfounded by how human friendly this place is. The shock really sets in when they realize that nature put all that there and that they're one of a handful of humans that have set foot on it's shoreline in the last 50 years. There's a hundred acre chunk of land for sale that I've been trying to secure funds for, but even if I can't, the Crown land goes on for thousands of square miles so I'll never run out of places to avoid humanity.

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Beyond the 5 items mentioned above, what else do you really need?

 

Safety equipment, cell phone or 2 way, signaling devices such as mirror and whistle and a first aid kit. In your particular neck of the woods survival sounds like a walk in the park, down here it aint that easy. I often have to carry up to 2 gallons of water on me as there is just none of it around, not to mention a lack of anything edible. The point i'm trying to make is people who don't have the knowledge or skills shouldn't be testing themselves in the 'real world' with only minimal gear.

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Safety equipment, cell phone or 2 way, signaling devices such as mirror and whistle and a first aid kit. In your particular neck of the woods survival sounds like a walk in the park, down here it aint that easy. I often have to carry up to 2 gallons of water on me as there is just none of it around, not to mention a lack of anything edible. The point i'm trying to make is people who don't have the knowledge or skills shouldn't be testing themselves in the 'real world' with only minimal gear.

 

I live in a temperate rain forest much like those of the South East of Australia but with more rain from what I understand so eating, and water are for the most part easy to take care of, and it seldom gets what could be considered truly cold here. There is likely a better chance of ill effects from heat during the warm months than cold weather injuries in the winter though is does get down to -12C with wind chills of -23C at times. The terrain can be trecherous in places, and though we do not have as many venomous snakes as you...one that we do have is very aggressive at certain times of the year. Another that usually isn't so aggressive when found in the open likes to hide under/in rotten logs and will often take moving said log as a threat and react accordingly.

 

 

But I agree, untrained people really shouldn't try it.

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Safety equipment, cell phone or 2 way, signaling devices such as mirror and whistle and a first aid kit. In your particular neck of the woods survival sounds like a walk in the park, down here it aint that easy. I often have to carry up to 2 gallons of water on me as there is just none of it around, not to mention a lack of anything edible. The point i'm trying to make is people who don't have the knowledge or skills shouldn't be testing themselves in the 'real world' with only minimal gear.

 

No, the untrained should definitely go prepared.  Reminds me of that guy that was a big Les Stroud, armchair type fan who decided to take an outing and never came back. You just knew sooner or later someone would try and emulate Les and end up dead.

 

"Walk in the park?" Ya I guess it is.  No poisonous snakes, or spiders...bears, moose, coyote and wolf all avoid you and don't like loud noises, food is seasonal, but there's lots of it, and no people for a thousand miles. hell ya! I love the Boreal Forest!

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No, the untrained should definitely go prepared.  Reminds me of that guy that was a big Les Stroud, armchair type fan who decided to take an outing and never came back. You just knew sooner or later someone would try and emulate Les and end up dead.

 

"Walk in the park?" Ya I guess it is.  No poisonous snakes, or spiders...bears, moose, coyote and wolf all avoid you and don't like loud noises, food is seasonal, but there's lots of it, and no people for a thousand miles. hell ya! I love the Boreal Forest!

 

There are always the ones who think because they've seen it over and over again on television that they can do it....not thinking how television always makes everything look easy. Look at the home improvement shows.

 

Sounds like heaven on earth Ant.

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my 5 are

 

A good strong carbon knife

A fire steel

bag of cotton wool

Stainless steel 1 litter bottle

the 5th item would be area specific, ie a machete for the jungle, axe for the boral forest, desalination pump for the ocean, sleeping bag for alpine and high mountains or a big tarp for the desert 

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my 5 are

 

A good strong carbon knife

A fire steel

bag of cotton wool

Stainless steel 1 litter bottle

the 5th item would be area specific, ie a machete for the jungle, axe for the boral forest, desalination pump for the ocean, sleeping bag for alpine and high mountains or a big tarp for the desert   

 

How do you deal with insects in the jungle? Are there things you can burn/ eat/ smear on you to help keep them at bay?

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There are always the ones who think because they've seen it over and over again on television that they can do it....not thinking how television always makes everything look easy. Look at the home improvement shows.

 

Sounds like heaven on earth Ant.

 

Mist, the thing that got me the most about day tripping through the Arkansas woods was the chiggers.  Before that, I'd never even heard of a chigger until I went down there and ended up with one buried in my leg.

 

Now mind you, winters up here are harsh. They last longer than down south, so you'd need to be adaptable to that. I suppose that's where the 'danger' factor is.

 

With that maybe I should change my list to include thermal undies. lol

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Mist, the thing that got me the most about day tripping through the Arkansas woods was the chiggers.  Before that, I'd never even heard of a chigger until I went down there and ended up with one buried in my leg.

 

Now mind you, winters up here are harsh. They last longer than down south, so you'd need to be adaptable to that. I suppose that's where the 'danger' factor is.

 

With that maybe I should change my list to include thermal undies. lol

 

Oh yeah..chiggers, tics, black widows, brown recluses...we have al kinds of creepy-crawlies to look out for down here.

 

You can bet if I ever do get to head up there the only way it will be in the winter is if I am running from something  :hugegrin:

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When ever i have been in the jungle its been a case of bathing everyday, keeping clean, drowning yourself in Deet.

 

Other than that its a case of having a smoky fire and smudging your cloths daily over the fire. There are plants that can produce a reliable insecticide when rubbed on the skin but they are normally local to a region and require local knowledge to know which ones are effective.

 

One problem with plants that i have come across is that one tribe know of a use for it but if you go to an other tribe they may not have a use for that plant or may have a completely different use for it. So local knowledge is not always reliable. One example of this is the Bastard palm in Guyana which has no use at all other than making blow pipes. Where as in Belize I recall it being the Give and Take Palm and was used as a antihistamine and the inner bark is rubbed on bites and scratches.  

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I live in central queensland which is in the north east of australia, it rarely drops below 10C (50F) here, right now it's 9pm in the middle of winter and it's 19.4C (67F). The lands here vary greatly, just a little bit north we have dense rainforest with flowing freshwater lakes, to the west it's what I would describe as typical australian bush, dry grasses and scattered shrubs and trees, kangaroos here and there but not much else. Plenty of snakes and spiders around the place, i think 6 of the 10 most poisonous snakes are found here. No large dangerous animals though which is good, unless you get in the water.

 

I've never encountered chiggers, from what i hear they're not alot of fun. Anything like sand flies?

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Hi Mat

 

I lived in Rockhampton, Emu Park, Yeppoon and out near Wallaroo when I was a kid, that was my first experience of both rainforest and the bush, I fell in love with both but the rainforest left a lasting impression on me which has lead me to many of the rainforests around the world.

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Water

Knife

Tarp

paracord

mag/flint stick

 

Water is the most precious commodity, especially here in the South with temps over 95*F day after day.

 

I would bring my mini-machete because I could use it for multi-purposes, like chopping small branches for kindling and for shelter building, for food preparation, and for self-protection if needed.

 

I have a large tarp that can serve as an instant shelter, it can be used to drag firewood, and it can capture rainwater.

 

The paracord can be used to tie down my tarp, used as a snare, I can separate the strands for dental floss, :grin: and I can use it for fishing line.

 

The mag/flint stick can be used in any conditions, whether wet or windy, and it will work every time.  :yes:  

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I live in central queensland which is in the north east of australia, it rarely drops below 10C (50F) here, right now it's 9pm in the middle of winter and it's 19.4C (67F)....

 

I've never encountered chiggers, from what i hear they're not alot of fun. Anything like sand flies?

 

If summer just started here a week ago...how are you already into the middle of your winter? What is your "official" first day of winter there? Our first day of summer is June 21st, I thought our summer and your winter coincided.

 

No chiggers are a different kind of pain in the @$$, they don't bite so much as they bury up in the skin and suck blood. They reeeeeaally itch and hurt!

 

 

 

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If summer just started here a week ago...how are you already into the middle of your winter? What is your "official" first day of winter there? Our first day of summer is June 21st, I thought our summer and your winter coincided.

 

When Matt wakes up and checks in he could tell you not only is he about half a day ahead of us time wise, being south of the equator his seasons are opposite of ours in the northern hemisphere. His summer solstice is our winter solstice and our spring equinox is his fall equinox.

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When Matt wakes up and checks in he could tell you not only is he about half a day ahead of us time wise, being south of the equator his seasons are opposite of ours in the northern hemisphere. His summer solstice is our winter solstice and our spring equinox is his fall equinox.

 

I know this, that's why I thought his winter and our summer coincided.

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Hi Mat

 

I lived in Rockhampton, Emu Park, Yeppoon and out near Wallaroo when I was a kid, that was my first experience of both rainforest and the bush, I fell in love with both but the rainforest left a lasting impression on me which has lead me to many of the rainforests around the world.

 

Small world, I currently live in Rockhampton. I love the scenery around here, no place i'd rather be.

 

If summer just started here a week ago...how are you already into the middle of your winter? What is your "official" first day of winter there? Our first day of summer is June 21st, I thought our summer and your winter coincided.

 

No chiggers are a different kind of pain in the @$$, they don't bite so much as they bury up in the skin and suck blood. They reeeeeaally itch and hurt!

 

 

 

 

June 1st is the start of winter here. I'm not sure how that works because I was thinking the same thing as you.

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You start your summer on the day of your summer solstice, but we don't start our winter on our winter solstice, instead we start it at the beginning of the month.

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