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Rockhounder

Weather (WX) Q & A:

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A temperature inversion is when the air is warmer the higher it is in the atmosphere. An inversion layer is when there is a blocking layer of cold air above the warm air. The inversion stops the upward movement movement of air trapping moister and heat near the ground and forms fog. This is often seen in inner city areas and causes smog. During cold winters Inversion layers can lead to freezing fog and even more damaging freezing rain.

 

Inversion layers are an indication to high pressure, this is because the atmosphere is stable enough to support inversion layers without mixing.

 

I hope everyone understands that!

 

 

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You pretty much nailed it. I'm sure you can spot the inversion quite easily on a skew-t diagram. I live in the foothills east of the great basin of California. At 1400ft elevation (the basin being under 100ft) I am right at the cusp of the inversion. When the valley below is socked in with fog, I am totally in sushine, but the bad part, is the "smog" Adi describes sits at the top of the inversion, therefore, even at my altitude, air quality where I live will be a lot worse than it is down in the valley.

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Yeah Inversions stand out well on Skew-t's. When I lived on Exmoor we used to get amazing inversions over the Bristol Channel. A low lying layer of thick fog around 200 meters thick. I used to sit up on the moors watching it in awe, especially When the RAF jets would fly sat right on top of it.

 

We got those when we were under an arctic air mass dominated by high pressure over warm seas. Relatively uncommon but spectacular when it did happen. 

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That was my reaction when I first started learning them but it is quite simple really.

 

Basicly the trace is a data stream taken from instruments that are found on a weather balloon.  

 

It is easier to understand than to explain.

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That was my reaction when I first started learning them but it is quite simple really.

 

Basicly the trace is a data stream taken from instruments that are found on a weather balloon.   

 

~  OHHhhhhhhh!     I Understand it now!    :thumbsup:  :yes:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

    :unsure:

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Here is a classic image of an inversion layer for what Rocky and I are talking about for fog and smog.

 

skewt_inversion.jpg

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I actually learnt something today. On NOAAs weather watches and warnings there is a warning called 'Red Flag' which I have never really taken much interest of them but today I see one and was intrigued enough to look it up and discovered it was a Fire Weather Warning.  I always thought they were called Fire Warnings. Its good to learn something new each day!

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Ok, on my way back from Fort Bragg I encountered these clouds on the drive home. They are altocumulus clouds but there is a particular phenom that is occuring here. What is it called?

 

Note: In the hazy background is a particulary interesting geological feature too called the "Buttes". If you look at interior California it is basically all flat, except for this conically shaped mountainous area. You can easily spot it on a map of California that shows topography. 

 

IMG_8077.jpg

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Wow!!! K-H waves on a lenticular cloud! That's a great shot!

 

Sorry T, I knew it was right on the tip of your tongue! :P But "C" clouds was REALLY close!  :rofl:

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El Nino/Southern Oscillation

 

I didn't want anybody losing sleep over it!

 

Ok, let me see if I can construct something a bit more captivating!

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If you have two equal volumes of air, but each volume has different moisture characterstics, say one volume was taken over the ocean (a moist volume of air) and another volume of equal size taken over a dry desert (a dry volume of air), which one would you think would have more mass, or which one would outweigh the other? Explain your choice.

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