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~ Is that brackish water?  :unsure:

 

Tasted fine to me. Just kidding it's shallow and muddy. There are lots of frogs and turtles. Not much in the way of fish.

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~ I LOVE your real life chop sticks!   :thumbsup:

 

I always thought chop sticks were ridiculous until now. My buddies dad sticks them in the pencil sharpener.  

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Thanks for sharing another day Muddy Pete.  I think those tracks were from a raccoon.

 

Was that a walking stick in one of the pictures?  If so, could you post a closer picture...I like walking sticks and am working on one right now.

 

Chop sticks are a nice touch by the way.  I never thought about sharpening them in a pencil sharpener, but that's a good idea.  I have an old sharpener I use for creating tinder shavings which works very well...who would have ever thought a pencil sharpener would have so many uses.  LOL

 

 

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Thanks for sharing another day Muddy Pete.  I think those tracks were from a raccoon.

 

Was that a walking stick in one of the pictures?  If so, could you post a closer picture...I like walking sticks and am working on one right now.

 

Chop sticks are a nice touch by the way.  I never thought about sharpening them in a pencil sharpener, but that's a good idea.  I have an old sharpener I use for creating tinder shavings which works very well...who would have ever thought a pencil sharpener would have so many uses.  LOL

 

 

 

His dad used them as skewers. I'll post a picture of the hiking stick. 

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The one and a half inch print, the length of stride, the weight of the animal, the length of toes and the main clue "no claws" Im almost kinda leaning towards young bob cat.

 

The other is a human boot print. 

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The one and a half inch print, the length of stride, the weight of the animal, the length of toes and the main clue "no claws" Im almost kinda leaning towards young bob cat.

 

The other is a human boot print.  

 

I've seen scat with fur in it in the same area. Not as much since the weather became hot. I assumed it was all coyote. The boot print was mine.  

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it definitely looks feline.  if you get a chance to take pictures of tracks again muddy always try to get the track between you and the sun (kind of hard to do at noon) it will really highten the detail of the track. the best time to track is early light or late afternoon. also cats direct register (there rear paw falls in the same track as the front one.  i think fox are the only canine that do this. looks like you had a great day out and i liked the chopsticks, when your done eating you can make a toothpick  :hugegrin: keep getting out buddy...I'm living vicariously threw you and your pictures  :thumbup:

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~ I KNOW you ain't puttin' no hot sauce on some ramen noodles now, are you?  :scared:

hot sause rocks on roman! i like throwing one of those little mre tobasco bottles into a dish of raman...good stuff

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I like ramon for camping :thumbup: hot say not so much  :nono:

aw come on survivorgirl...you got to live a little  :P razors motto (well macinkos motto) if you aint sweating...you aint eating  ;)

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I didn't even see the picture measuring the stride...DEFINATELY NOT a coon! 

 

What is the diagonal line to the outside of the track?  (lower left)

 

Are there claw marks at the end of the toes because I can't tell?  If so it would most likely not be a bobcat.  Felines travel with their claws retracted most of the time.

 

 

 

 

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What is the diagonal line to the outside of the track?  (lower left)

 

 

I noticed that when I put the pictures up. I don't think it's part of the animal track. It could be a hole or disturbance in the sand or possibly a stone I knocked aside when I was taking measurements. I'll go back out and take another look at the tracks this weekend.

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Grey fox, red fox, coyote and wolf all step into their front paw tracks. Most domestic dogs dont. I have followed wolf tracks (it will amaze you just how far they travel in one night) for miles and it resembles a dotted line in the snow. We start out our early morning coyote hunts be driving country roads looking for fresh tracks where they cross the roads then circle the section to see if they crossed into the next section. If not then we know their in that section some where. I have two observations about this.

 

1. All the wild canines travel nearly the same routs year to year. In other words if you see tracks crossing the road this year it is almost certain they will cross the same place next year and the years after.

 

2. This is an amazing observation to me. A lot of times coyotes travel in pairs or even up to three or four or more at times. Possibly they are a litter that has not broken up yet or its breeding season. Heres the surprising thing. They seem to be aware of the fact they are leaving foot prints. We have seen many times a single track crossing and if you follow it a ways from the road it will turn into two or three coyotes that crossed stepping into each others tracks. It has happened too many times to be an accident.

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Grey fox, red fox, coyote and wolf all step into their front paw tracks. Most domestic dogs dont. I have followed wolf tracks (it will amaze you just how far they travel in one night) for miles and it resembles a dotted line in the snow. We start out our early morning coyote hunts be driving country roads looking for fresh tracks where they cross the roads then circle the section to see if they crossed into the next section. If not then we know their in that section some where. I have two observations about this.

 

1. All the wild canines travel nearly the same routs year to year. In other words if you see tracks crossing the road this year it is almost certain they will cross the same place next year and the years after.

 

2. This is an amazing observation to me. A lot of times coyotes travel in pairs or even up to three or four or more at times. Possibly they are a litter that has not broken up yet or its breeding season. Heres the surprising thing. They seem to be aware of the fact they are leaving foot prints. We have seen many times a single track crossing and if you follow it a ways from the road it will turn into two or three coyotes that crossed stepping into each others tracks. It has happened too many times to be an accident.

Interesting observation, Swede.  I wonder if that is something they have learned to do so only one has to break a trail in the snow, making it easier for the ones following?

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I have only seen this where they cross roads. Not all the time however it happens when they are not in a hurry.Also they will travel by starting yards from a crossing to cross where an open gate is or a fence line with easy access.

 

Another observation is deer or coyotes traveling through unhurried will most likely take the easiest route. Thats why ancient man and  modern man follow game trails.

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I didn't even see the picture measuring the stride...DEFINATELY NOT a coon! 

 

What is the diagonal line to the outside of the track?  (lower left)

 

Are there claw marks at the end of the toes because I can't tell?  If so it would most likely not be a bobcat.  Felines travel with their claws retracted most of the time.

 

 

 

 

They are definitely cat tracks of some kind. If you can draw an X between toes 1&2 and 3&4 without hitting the heel pad its canine. Since the cat was striding the tracks remain in a row. If he was running they follow a horse stride pattern. If this is a house cat its a big one but its possible its a large male.

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Here's an interesting tid bit on coyotes...there used to be a bounty on them at back when.. There were numerous studies done on coyotes before this bounty time period, during and after things settled down and the bounties long disappeared.

 

This is what was found and I find it truely amazing.  During the years this bounty hunting took place the number of pups in a coyote litter increased!  In other words, as they were being heavily hunted the number of pups in a litter increased and as hunting pressure decreased so did the number of pups.

 

As for the track it's really hard for me to tell from the computer screen point of view.  Were there claw marks?????

 

 

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They are definitely cat tracks of some kind. If you can draw an X between toes 1&2 and 3&4 without hitting the heel pad its canine. Since the cat was striding the tracks remain in a row. If he was running they follow a horse stride pattern. If this is a house cat its a big one but its possible its a large male.

 

Coyote, bob cat, red fox have all become more common in urban area around here due excessive land development.

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Day off today. I went out to do a little tracking and play with pointy objects.

 

P8070006.jpg

 

It was nice out so I went barefoot.

 

P8070005.jpg

 

P8070015.jpg

 

P8070023.jpg

 

 

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