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damn, ofg beat me, i was going to say crawdad hole. if the wood is dry and punky it will work good to use to get a coal from friction. just from the pics  i am thinking your best bet for tinder is from still standing dead trees or last years anuals plants that might still be standing. i think i saw some chickweed in one picture, good to eat, not tasty by any means but food none the less. i saw some flox, its full of soapasin. you can crush it in your hands and mix with water to get suds that will help wash your hands. other than that its hard to really see the plants.

 

~ That's great info. razor sharp! You sure know a lot about plants...    :unsure:  Now what pic is all that stuff in?  :dontgetit:

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~ That's great info. razor sharp! You sure know a lot about plants...    :unsure:  Now what pic is all that stuff in?   :dontgetit:

i might be wrong, its hard to tell from the pics. 6 has the chickweed i think and 8 has the flox(spelled wrong im sure :blush: its the white 4 pettal flowers. (some are purple around here) im sure they go by many names but thats what i know them by.

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i might be wrong, its hard to tell from the pics. 6 has the chickweed i think and 8 has the flox(spelled wrong im sure :blush: its the white 4 pettal flowers. (some are purple around here) im sure they go by many names but thats what i know them by.

 

~ Knowing them... is what matters, razor. Knowing their names only mattered when people started naming stuff.  :arigato:  Wisdom is all that counts.  :thumbup:

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The big dark bark vines look like wild grape.   The second photo of logs looked like floatsum, logs and brush from last years floods.   If there are any areas along the creek that gets a lot of sun, there should be some cattails, a good source of tinder.

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stormsmal.jpg

 

I have NO idea why this pic came out so small, but THIS is why I left...   thunder started cracking, and I got out of there. It actually hailed on me for about three minutes, then it was just rain.

 

I saw a lot of stuff that looked like it would be good tinder, but like I said, this spot is sacred "feeling"....   I'm not sure if all of you know what that means, but I do know that some of you do. When a place feels like that, you don't take anything from there... you try not to even touch stuff.  :thumbup:

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II saw a lot of stuff that looked like it would be good tinder, but like I said, this spot is sacred "feeling"....  I'm not sure if all of you know what that means, but I do know that some of you do. When a place feels like that, you don't take anything from there... you try not to even touch stuff.  :thumbup:

 

Does the area have a history? Indian settlements something like that.

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Does the area have a history? Indian settlements something like that.

 

~ I have no idea....  I know the history of my town pretty well but that's pre civil war history and beyond. This is way out of the outskirts of town, so I don't know.

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~ I guess, when I say it feels sacred, I mean that no people go there. (I think). Some places just "feel" different.  There's no garbage laying around, like there is in parks, and there's no trail leading into the place.

 

Honestly, if my College Biology professor Dr. Burkette hadn't taken us there, I wouldn't have a clue it was there. (He was actually a Botony specialist)

 

He took us there (to show us a floodplain) and then he took us to a Pure... Long Leaf Pine forest.... THAT was magical. I am trying to remember where it was. It was further away than this place.

 

He took us to lots of different places showing us how the lay of the land defines what grows there. It was one of my favorite classes cause he always grabbed his keys and said "Let's GO!"  :thumbup:  (any professor who grabs his keys and says lets get out in the woods... has my attention)

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I think I saw some Jewelweed in the one picture.

 

I agree about the grape vine too.

 

~ It could be, but if it is.... it's not grapevine, it's Muscadine vine. (that's southern for grape) LOL.....  nothing like some good ole Muscadine wine. That's the only wild grape-like fruit that grows here.

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I think I saw some Jewelweed in the one picture.

 

I agree about the grape vine too.

very observant watcher. i thought i saw jewelweed but wasnt sure. still kind of young. maby even some wood nettle.

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Just looked over your pictures again, Taken. That area reminds me of the creek area on my parents farm.

 

First thing I would try (that I can see in the picrues) would be the dry leaves on the ground. They don't make that great of tinder for catching a spark, but if you crunch them up into little pieces, it would be worth a chance.  I would also look for snags near the creek - the places in the little trees and weeds that catch stuff washing down during high water. Usually there is grass (corn leaves around here) and other stuff.  It gets held up in the air and dries out pretty good after being soaked (might be a bit dusty though).

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Just looked over your pictures again, Taken. That area reminds me of the creek area on my parents farm.

 

First thing I would try (that I can see in the picrues) would be the dry leaves on the ground. They don't make that great of tinder for catching a spark, but if you crunch them up into little pieces, it would be worth a chance.  I would also look for snags near the creek - the places in the little trees and weeds that catch stuff washing down during high water. Usually there is grass (corn leaves around here) and other stuff.  It gets held up in the air and dries out pretty good after being soaked (might be a bit dusty though).

 

~ Believe me, OFG... dried leaves even crunched up into little peices will burn, but they won't catch a spark from a Mag/flint firestarter. it's hard finding something that will. I just need a new firestarting method...  :hugegrin:  AND A new camera!

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~ It could be, but if it is.... it's not grapevine, it's Muscadine vine. (that's southern for grape) LOL.....  nothing like some good ole Muscadine wine. That's the only wild grape-like fruit that grows here.

If they are muscadine vines, that place is sacred. Lol you should visit in the late summer or early fall. I love finding them during squirrell season here in Arkansas. I'm not a drinker but I'm always up for a free snack. :-)

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Great pics, Taken!  I love the wisteria!

 

People in colder climates have NO idea how jungle-like the Deep South can be during the summer.  Some areas are totally impassable because of the heavy undergrowth and thick vines, not to mention the snakes and alligators and eagle-sized mosquitoes.  :yes:

 

 

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Nice shots, that looks somewhat like an Empress tree in the first pic. I miss the flood plains areas along the southern chattahoochee river.

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I just need a new firestarting method...  :hugegrin:

 

Well, a gallon of gas and a book of matches works pretty well for me! :P

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Yep been there before. I think ol mother nature didn't like it either. As soon as I lit the flame the wind kicked up. Spent the rest of that day with a pine limb beating down the flames in the pasture. It actually worked out since it needed a good mowing but it was a lot of work and worry.

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sadly enough.... we've had so much rain over the last few years, all that land is like a swamp now. I Just saw this thread on a whim, and I Miss that little area, but it's pretty much impassable. Where the elements collide (like where water meets earth) are  very volatile spaces.

 

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