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1 - my knife

2 - flint and steel

 

Everything else is just extra bonus, but if I had to add 8 more;

 

3 - tent fly, (not the tent)

4 - Machete, or axe

5 - paracord bracelett

6 - xtra socks

7 - notebook, pencil

8 - guitar string

9 - leather patch 12"x12"

10 - High proof whiskey.  to the devil with a med kit. The only thing I need is a disinfectant and isopropyl only has one use, Johnny Walker has many.  :angel:

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1 - my knife

2 - flint and steel

 

Everything else is just extra bonus, but if I had to add 8 more;

 

 

10 - High proof whiskey.  to the devil with a med kit. The only thing I need is a disinfectant and isopropyl only has one use, Johnny Walker has many.  :angel:

I agree with the first part, and though I am a bit of a Johnny Walker fan......, Turkey is stronger :)

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Thank you ant...I realize I need to add something back to my survival kit that is in our backpacks.  A stainless steel flask of 190 proof grain alcohol.  Wonder if it needs to be in something special to take car heat?

 

About how much does that weigh?

 

I'll weigh it when the wife gets home this evening.  It's in the trunk of her car.

 

 

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Nurker, it's not only a medical supply, and a fire starter, but it can also be a moral boost.  If you're lost, or just plain rained on and soaked for days on end, it can be the difference between the need to go on, and the urge to quit.

 

Don't see any problem with long term storage as long as it's out of direct sunlight.

 

Mist, I'll see your turkey and raise you a Glenfiddich.  The wife is Scottish so only the best.

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Well I have been known to have a flask of Wild Turkey in my pack, or possible some Bailey's Irish Cream, but I prefer 15 year old Dimple Pinch for medical purposes :D

 

randalls1985pinchut1.jpg

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1.  Epipen (Epinephrine as I'm allergic to all nuts and they are prevelant in the bush)

2.  Knife (Everything is made easier with a good knife)

3.  A Cell Phone (I hate to say a cell phone because it's so anti-outdoors, but I have kids and he's most likely with me and it would be greatly irresponsible for me not to take something that could contact authorities in a real emergency in seconds)

4.  Food and Water

5.  Swedish Fire Match (Magnesium Stick)

6.  Extra Clothing including rain gear, hat, bandana and socks.

7.  Rope (550 Paracord, as much as comfortable to carry)

8.  Light Camp Hammock (nothing beats getting off the ground for me)

9.  First Aid Kit (With Needle and Thread and Super Glue.. I've superglued a deep cup shut more than once and been fine. Went down to the bone once and still turned out well)

10. Compass and map

 

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About how much does that weigh?

I'll weigh it when the wife gets home this evening.  It's in the trunk of her car.

 

Five and a half pounds, survivordan.  I actually thought it would be heavier until I put it on the scales.

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Just a reminder on this subject on WHY you need them...

http://www.msnbc.msn.com/id/25082517/

LONGMIRE, Wash. - An Army Chinook helicopter has rescued two hikers who were stranded high on the Mount Rainier's flank after a freak blizzard.

 

They were picked up about 9:15 a.m. ET Wednesday at Camp Muir for a flight to Madigan Hospital at the Army base near Tacoma for treatment or transport to another hospital, Mount Rainier National Park spokesman Kevin Bacher said.

 

The man and woman had frostbite and hypothermia from being caught overnight Monday in a blizzard that killed the woman's husband.

 

The three had been on a day hike to Camp Muir when they were caught in the storm that dumped 2 feet of snow. Camp Muir is at about 10,000 feet elevation on the 14,410-foot mountain.

 

Bacher said the three people in their 30s from Bellevue, east of Seattle, were experienced climbers and two had reached the top of Mount Rainier before.

 

Three doctors, clients of a climbing concessionaire in the park, were at Camp Muir with the two surviving hikers, who were suffering from frostbite and hypothermia but were in stable condition, Bacher said.

 

The three hikers were described as two men and a woman in their early 30s, all from Bellevue, east of Seattle. The dead hiker was the woman's husband, Bacher said.

 

After a winter of heavy snowfall that forced repeated closure of mountain passes, unseasonably cold conditions have continued long into spring in Washington's Cascade Range. Paradise, the jumping off point for the trail to Camp Muir, received 2 feet of fresh snow overnight, with 5-foot drifts at the camp, Bacher said.

 

Bacher said rangers received a call at 3:30 a.m. Tuesday that the hikers were trapped in a blizzard.

 

Weather prevented a rescue attempt at that time, but one of the hikers reached Camp Muir at 7:15 a.m. The other hikers were found near Anvil Rock, a large outcropping at the edge of the Muir snowfield about 500 feet lower than Camp Muir.

 

Waiting out storm

International Mountain Guides had eight climbing clients and four guides at Camp Muir, while Rainier Mountaineering Inc. had 15 clients and a handful of guides there Tuesday. Both companies said their employees and clients were doing well, but hunkered down awaiting better weather.

 

"I do know it was a tough night up there for the weather, just because of what they were forecasting — high winds and low visibility and snow," said Jeff Martin, RMI operations manager. "Definitely not your typical June weather."

 

The bodies of two other hikers were found in California's Sierra Nevada backcountry last week.

 

El Dorado County Sheriff's Lt. Les Lovell said an autopsy performed Tuesday revealed that 70-year-old Thomas Hylton died of a heart of attack on June 2, the day he and 78-year-old Jerome Smith set out for a four-day backpacking trip in Desolation Wilderness just west of Lake Tahoe.

 

Smith left for help after his friend collapsed but fell down a hillside on his way back to the highway. The sheriff's office said he died from his injuries and exposure to the chilly overnight temperature.

 

The men's families reported them missing Thursday when they failed to return home to Lincoln, a bedroom community north of Sacramento.

 

 

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Good post Mr. Coffee.  Always important to remember how it can all go bad so quickly.

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At least they died doing what they loved instead of waiting for death in a nursing home.

 

Died with their boots on. :salute:

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Swede, ya got a point, but still..... :/

 

I always wonder how hard it would have been to prevent the death/injuries in the first place.

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Mist, I'll see your turkey and raise you a Glenfiddich.  The wife is Scottish so only the best.

 

Attaboy!!  With a last name like mine (Scott), Glenfiddich is the only way to go!

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55 gallon trash bags (3-4)

 

insect repellent

 

ferro rod/ tinder

 

key chain flashlight

 

compass

 

small folder/SAK

 

fixed blade

 

money belt - good place to stash a few extra items

 

key chain pill bottle w ibuprofin

 

leather work gloves

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- fixed blade

- 2 x 55 gal construction bags

- waterpur tabs in sealed foil paks

- Gi canteen / Gi cup combo + esbit tabs and container of lemon tea powder

- firesteel / Lee valley steel scraper http://www.leevalley.com/wood/page.aspx?c=1&p=32672&cat=1,310,41069 (for making very nice shavings quickly, without dulling my knife, and to strike the firesteel)

- fatwood stick + tin of PJCB + very fine fatwood shavings + lighter

- couple Snickers bars

- Rite in Rain notebook and cedar construction pencil

- whistle

- Surefire E1l led flashlight + 2 backup batts

 

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Good lookin' list Bushman.    I think the largest construction bags in our area are 30 gallon, 55's must be huge    lol.

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Guest smallgamehunter

Breeden SGH

few first aid items

package of pur purifier

small pieces of fatwood

plastic match case

travel bottle of advil with days dose of prescription meds inside

3 germ-x wipes in single package  (make good tinder and improvise toilet paper)

us military 1qt canteen with canteen cup

 

everything but  canteen carried in a us military single grenade pouch if im day hiking or in a military issue mapcase if im on a longer trip

 

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fire steel and tinder

 

fixed blade

 

folding blade

 

bic style lighter

 

a few bright orange heavy duty leaf bags

 

small fishing kit

 

folding saw or small camp axe depending on the pack i carry

 

small first aid kit( mainly sutcher mateirials and butterflys)

 

water straw.....thses things are awesome

 

bug juice or smoke sticks for the bugs.

 

 

 

 

thats my 10....cheers

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