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Tornado Emergency Plans

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Steel Culverts.  As a last resort yes.  You have to keep in mind the flood threat.  i've seen these Culverts full.  And it'll happen very quick.  If there is a culvert, there may be a field close by that's draining into it. 

 

Best suggestion, Be Aware.  Watches are issued well in advance if conditons are favorable for Tornadic development.  Keep your tv tuned to a local channel, have your weather radio on.  If storms develop in your area, get out and get south of the storm if it's safe.  If not drive in the opposite direction of development until you can get south.  If you have a radio scanner, find what frequency the storm spotters operate on and listen. If it does get dangerous, then the weather service will tell them how to get out of harms way.  I'd rather be south and away watching that being "involved". 

 

However with all this said, nothing is better than being underground in this situation.  Neighbors will have a cellar and I doubt they'd say no to you. 

 

Bottom line..  It's better to be an observer than a participant.  I've been in there once due to lack of visibility and bad directions from the person at the NWS.  Not something I want to repeat.

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Hey Holly.  I told one of the guys from the Weather Service here the same thing ADI told you.  Next week he sent me a report of a Tornado near Aberdeen in Scotland and it was as big and as powerful as any I've seen.  There are some, there are even Chase groups in the UK.  Of course I didn't find out about that until I moved here!

 

I think it's funny that Brighton Beach had a water spout over the ocean, just a couple days after I had been there doing some sight-seeing!  :woot:

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Many happy memories of Brighton.  Had relatives that stayed there.  I alway though of beaches as places with sand :)  until I went to Brighton that is.

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Haggis, I was accustomed to the soft white sands of my native North Carolina beaches.  Imagine my shock when I moved over here in January and my husband took me to Brighton and I walked...errr...rolled...on the rocks on the beach.  I've never seen such a thing in my life!  :scared:

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I live 9 miles away from Brighton, and I never once heard any type of warning or sirens or anything!  :scared:

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Hi Haggis67 are you in the UK? And are you in Mountain Rescue? I think i spot KSMRT landrover in your profile pic.

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Not any more Adi, been gone from there for a few years now.  You'd be right on the LandRover :).  Cairngorms MRT was where you'd find me passing my time.  Havent seen a good mountain in years :)

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~ National Geographic Magazine did a full feature on one of their famous Storm Chasers Tim Samaras who could not escape the huge F5 tornado in El Reno Oklahoma this past May. His photography has been featured in their magazine for years. The tornado that ended their lives was the largest ever recorded, it was 1.6 miles wide. Another storm chaser captured the tornado that took so many lives. There's just something awe inspiring about storms. They are terrible and beautiful at the same time... but only if you're looking from a distance.

 

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A father-and-son team of storm chasers and their long-time partner were heard screaming 'we're going to die, we're going to die' on highway patrol radio moments before they were killed by one of the savage twisters they'd devoted their lives to following.

Tim Samaras, 55, along with his son, Paul Samaras, 24, and Carl Young, 45, died on Friday in El Reno after a tornado that packed winds of up to 165 mph picked up their car and threw it, somersaulting, a half a mile.

The elder Samaras' body was still belted into their Chevrolet Cobalt, which was found on an unimproved county road parallel to Interstate 40. The other victims' bodies were found half a mile to the east and half a mile to the west, Canadian County under-sheriff Chris West said.

 

 

Read more: http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-2335431/Tim-Samaras-dies-Tragic-words-father-son-storm-chasers-killed-tornado-threw-car-somersaulting-half-mile.html#ixzz2n7oxKq7d

Follow us: @MailOnline on Twitter | DailyMail on Facebook

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~ National Geographic says the storm was so huge it had multiple vortices and one just snuck up them and swept them right into the monster they were trying to parallel on the highway.

 

That whole edition of National geographic was devoted to storm footage. There are some awe inspiring photos in that edition.

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Thanks for the info, taken.  I will have to find that issue.

 

I believe Tim was one of the more cautious storm chasers and for him and his crew to get caught like that was shocking.  Looking at the video, you can see multiple vortices moving around the main funnel.  That storm was a beast.  A large storm like that can drop funnels all around the surrounding area.  I was talking to a neighbor who was watching the F5 that went about 4 miles north of me in 2008. We was so fascinated watching the main funnel, he didn't notice another funnel coming down right on top of him.  He heard tree branches breaking, finally looked up and ran to his basement.

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I've always been fascinated by big weather like that.  Luck plays a major part sometimes.  I'm drawn to tornados and big storms,  I wander around in front of the house.  I just can't help myself.  I can understand the draw for Samaras.  Even the safest guy on earth doing something with an element of danger is still at risk. 

 

 

I wonder what the death rate is for storm chasers vs other dangerous occupations? 

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