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I'm looking to improve on the type of foods that I eat while I'm on the trail or camping. I've been experimenting with different components and options based on:

 

Cost

Bulk

Ease of preparation

Nutritional value/taste. I've read all sorts of information on calories counts and carbs and this vs. that until I my eyes rolled back in my head. Then I picked up Colin Fletchers Complete Walker III (now IV) where he had the same dilemma.

 

Basically the answer was: Chuck it. Eat what you like. If it tastes like crap, no ones going to want to eat it. Hopefully, others will jump in and help fine tune the process.    

 

Like any survival kit, I've learned the best ones are the ones you assemble yourself.  

 

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This is a homemade food kit that I like to carry. Reasonable cost to assemble.

 

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Contents. Most of the items came off the shelf in the local super market. The ziploc bag can double as a water container.  

 

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This is an MRE. Pretty much self contained except the heating element that's used to heat the meal is not included. I've only eaten one of these and it didn't taste that bad to me.  

Cost about $8.00 retail or a case for about $80.00. There seems to be a fairly wide variety of entrees. This one was a Penne pasta 300 calories in the entree. 

 

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They're bulky. I just opened the package and carry the entree in a cargo pocket.  

 

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Mountain House among other companies sells freeze dried meals. Easy to prepare. Just boil water and eat right out of the pouch. Tasty if you don't mind a little gas. Retail price $4.00-$8.00. Wal-Mart is now carries Mountain House so it's easy to find.

 

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A little more work in camp but worth it. Again just add hot water.

 

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Not too bad. Bulky but no dishes to clean up.

 

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Ramen noodles and Slim Jims are not good together.

 

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A few things to make life a bit more civilized.

 

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A few items prepared at home.

 

Bannock AKA Monkey bread. It's like Bisquick. There's all sorts of things you can do with it. It keeps well and it's cheap and easy to make.

 

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Muddy Pete trail mix. Not much left.  :)

 

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Hard tack. Baked flour and water. It's an old way to keep flour from getting mildew and bugs on the trail. Break it up, let it rehydrate and you're in bidness.

 

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Mainstay bars. 400 calories per bar. Six bars per package. It's a butter cookie.

 

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Datrex bars. Individually wrapped. 200 calories per bar.

 

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May Day apple cinnamon food rations. 200 calories per bar.

 

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These were the better tasting of the energy bars. 220 calories per bar.

 

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Great post Muddy! Very thorough! I have a couple MRE's left from my mil days. They're pretty good too. Each case would contain a "kosher" and a "vegetarian" one too. What do you use to make the bannock mix?

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my alltime favorite is the penutbutter powerbar. i could stuff my backpack with nuthing but those and some drink mix (like Gatorade packets) and id be good for about a month  moose0024.gif

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i also like the wheat bread packet in the mre's with the jalapeno cheese spread. i could eat that stuff for a week without getting tired of it. it helps that a buddy of mine is a cook in the military and gives me a big box of mre's every year after his annual training gig.

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Ill give this post 10  moose0024.gif moose0024.gif moose0024.gif moose0024.gif moose0024.gif moose0024.gif moose0024.gif moose0024.gif moose0024.gif moose0024.gif

 

The only thing I thought about is to raid the condiment counter at the gas station or fast food place for the little packets of sauces rather then carrying the bottles. 

 

Thanks for your time and efforts Muddy  :arigato:

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The only thing I thought about is to raid the condiment counter at the gas station or fast food place for the little packets of sauces rather then carrying the bottles.  

 

 

The bottles only go on car trips and cookouts. I have found tabasco sauce bottles in small 1oz sizes and there is a company called Southwest Specialty Foods that makes medium size bottles of hot sauces. I stuff my pockets with condiments from the restaurants.

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What do you use to make the bannock mix?

 

White flour - 4 cups. If you prefer wheat flour go for it.

Baking powder - 8 tsp

Salt - 1 tsp

Sugar - 1 tsp

 

I mix into a large Zip Loc, then portion into smaller bags on the trail. Just add enough water to make a gooey doughball consistency.

 

I like to stuff mine with cheese and diced veggies. Fruit works too. It’s not bad plain either.

 

 

   

 

 

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i like it rolled in Cinnamon and brown sugar and baked on a stick. roll it and wrap it like a a clay snake around the end of a stick. you can do the same thing with the cheapo biscuits. cut them in a a spiraling circle so you can make them long. wrap around a stick like a snake. keep it away from the flame so it bakes and doesn't burn. scouts love monkey bread muddy  :thumbup:

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i love your topic muddy, great thread. ive always been a backpacker so i like the quick easy stuff. ill give you all a trick for raman noodles. at home befor your trip take the roman noodles and crush them up a little and put them in a zip lock freezer bag (make sure its a freezer bag, the regular ones puncture to easy). add the seasoning you prefer and i like to dehydrate canned chicken breast and add to it. when you are ready to make them bring your water to a boil. put the zip lock bag in a insulated coffee cup and open. pour in your hot water and zip shut (make sure the cup is big enugh)  and put the lid on. let it stand for 10 minuts or so while you do whatever else needs doin. then open and eat with a spoon. when your almost done pull the bag out and pour whats left in your mouth. put the used bag in another zip lock for trash. no dirty dishes and verry little trash. (you can fit 5-8 used zip locks in the trash one. you can do this with any dehydrated home cooked food, not just roman noodles but you get the idea. just make sure any meats are torn or cut up small or they wont rehydrate well. hell we could start a whole thread just on dehydrating food at home for backpacking.  :thumbup:

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I am thinking of getting a food Dehydrator. A damn sight cheaper in the long run than shop bought dehydrated food and a lot tastier too.

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