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Muddy Pete

Hurricane Irene bug out gear

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Basic emergency gear for bugging out. Intended to support 3 adults.

 

Food/ water: 6 gallons of bottled water divided between two vehicles, 1 case MRE's. Assorted dried foods, powdered milk. Coleman stove to cook on.

 

Cash, personal survival kit, multitool, small fixed blade. Lap top, Needed a deck of cards or a book.

 

Communication: Cell phones, plus the adaptors so they could be charged in the car. Walkie talkies, Handheld digital scanner, Grundig shortwave radio.

 

Maps: We stayed in a hotel during the evacuation. 2 separate vehicles everyone had maps, directions and the number of the hotel in case of unplanned detours. CP service was messed up.

 

One back pack for each person. Each with a flashlight, multitool, space blanket, rain gear, jacket. Mine has more survival gear, the others are more basic.

 

First Aid: 1 first aid kit in each car, several smaller kits in each bag

 

Clothing for a long weekend. Warm jackets rain gear

 

Tool bag: wrenches/ screwdrivers/pliers, flashlights, block of AA & AAA batteries, SAK.

 

 

 

 

 

 

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~ Great information Muddy Pete! I need a cell phone charger for my car. I had one for my old phone, but I don't have one for my new phone.  :thumbup:

 

Walmart may sell hand-crankable chargers depending on your model.

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Taken I use a solar charger which works great, you have a damn lot more sun than i do and its stronger too. It might be worth looking into.

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What about all your personal paper work i.e. bank stuff, insurance, madical and the like?

Spare fuel for the cars.

Bedding of sleeping bags just in case you are stranded on the road.

 

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Is that your full bug out bag?

 

I broke it down to the key items. I have a compass, firestarting gear, My hiking packs and bug out bag are the same. That way the gear stays current.

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What about all your personal paper work i.e. bank stuff, insurance, madical and the like?

Spare fuel for the cars.

Bedding of sleeping bags just in case you are stranded on the road.

 

 

Forgot to list it. Yes we have a fireproof metal box with the papers. I have a Toyota so external fuel cans don't work and keeping a fuel can in the trunk with the supplies didn't seem like a good idea. On a truck with venting, sure. Sleeping bags I hadn't thought of.

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Forgot to list it. Yes we have a fireproof metal box with the papers. I have a Toyota so external fuel cans don't work and keeping a fuel can in the trunk with the supplies didn't seem like a good idea. On a truck with venting, sure. Sleeping bags I hadn't thought of.

~ You can't sleep outside in a hurricane anyway, and I'm pretty sure you aren't supposed to stay in your car.  :unsure:

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~ You can't sleep outside in a hurricane anyway, and I'm pretty sure you aren't supposed to stay in your car.  :unsure:

 

Four years ago there was a snowstorm in Pennsylvania that stranded hundreds of motorists on I-78 between Harrisburg and Allentown. In the cold months I stock everyone's cars with emergency blankets and sleeping bags and hand warmers. We through the Kelty Noah tarp and tent in the trunk when we left. Sleeping bags would have been a good idea.   

 

 

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Bugout gear with pictures. Also 6-1 gallon bottles of water, enough dried food for 3 people for about 3-4 days. MSR stove.

 

Tool bag. Contents weigh 12 pounds. I picked a soft tool bag over the standard hard toolbox (small car here) so it will fit better if the trunk is full.

 

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Standard tools, brick of AA and AAA batteries pack of zip-ties. Digital multi-meter which, one day I will learn how to use.  :P

 

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Extra items: SAK with a whistle, Buck fixed blade, County Com pry bar with a homemade sheath, parachute cord, emergency space blanket.

 

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Nu-wick 44 hour emergency candle which I haven’t tried yet. Pocket chainsaw.

 

P9010024.jpg

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Standard duffle with my everyday clothes. Camouflage gets me too much attention so regular clothes, rain gear, warm jackets, hats.

 

P9010026.jpg

 

Extra stuff in the bottom of bag. Digital scanner, parachute cord, more batteries, homemade first aid kit.

 

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Cargo vest. Most of the loose objects were stuff I stuck in my pockets over the weekend.

 

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These are my everyday hiking packs but I added a few extra items in case of an unwelcomed change of scenery.

 

P9010012.jpg

 

All three have the same basic contents. The Camel Bak has a 3 liter water bladder, The North Face pack has two 32oz Nalgene bottles and each has a small cook set with an Esbit stove.

 

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I’ve added a baggie to each pack with a travel size toothbrush, toothpaste and a chunk of antibacterial (Dial) soap (not shown). The toothbrushes are Colgate Wisp mini brushes and come in a pack of 16. I also threw in some tide detergent packets for doing trash-bag camp laundry or in the hotel sink. This is just a back up. Everyone has a normal travel toiletries kit in their regular luggage.  

 

P9010014.jpg

 

 

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Standard tools, brick of AA and AAA batteries pack of zip-ties. Digital multi-meter which, one day I will learn how to use.  :P

 

P9010020.jpg

 

 

 

 

I prefer re-chargeable because I use so many, but I understand in a situation recharging would be a pain if even possible. As far as standard batteries go I use these more than any others. I can get up to 200 or so photos using these in my camera, where as with standard batteries I'll do good to get 40 and with "dollar-store" brand i have been lucky to get 5 per pair of batteries from the one pack I tried. These have lasted a lot longer in my flash lights too. They are definitely more expensive but how much is being able to see or hear the weather worth in a bad situation?

 

http://www.energizer.com/products/lithium-batteries/lithium/Pages/lithium-batteries.aspx

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