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Death by falling or death by a severe injury as a result of a high fall. When I was up on the platform I wondered if anyone had considered jumping and if they did, how long would it take to hit rock on the next level.

You would think that, and there have been multiple fatalities due this this, however, more people have been killed due to another cause. 

Hint - That actual cause of death is severe traumatic injury, but not due to falling from the rim or a fall within the canyon.

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You would think that, and there have been multiple fatalities due this this, however, more people have been killed due to another cause. 

Hint - That actual cause of death is severe traumatic injury, but not due to falling from the rim or a fall within the canyon.

 

Would it be from falling rocks?

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Acceleration of a free falling object is 9.8 meters *t^2 or 32 feet *t^2 (Your speed increases 9.8 meters or 32 feet per second every second you fall), so Wile E Coyote  falling for 4 seconds, falls 78.4 meters (257 feet), reaching a speed of 39.2 meters per second (87.6 miles per hour). 

Not so much the falling, but the sudden stop at the end.

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Would it be from falling rocks?

Nope.  Only 5-6 people have been killed from falling rocks.  There are two cases where two people were in the same tent, rock comes down, one is dead, the other has not a scratch.

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~ Heart attack? Stroke? Falling off of mules? Getting stepped on by the Mule train?

No to all of those.

Another interesting fact - no one has ever been killed while riding a mule train.

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hang gliding? or plane crashes? Or testing out cardboard wings?  :unsure:

DING DING DING!!!!! Taken wins again!!!

 

Aircraft crashes. 

More people have been killed from plane and helicopter crashes in the canyon than from all other causes combined.  Almost all of these were sight seeing over flights.

 

Even when you exclude the June 30, 1956 mid air collision of two passenger planes over the canyon that killed 128 people (which led to the creation of the FAA), more people have been killed in this manner than from all other causes combined.

 

Not a whole lot of places for a "soft landing" in the canyon.

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Nope on the auto accident.

However, after the movie "Thelma and Louise" came out in 1983, there were three "copy-cat suicides" where people drove  vehicals (strangely, all of them rental cars) over the edge to kill themselves.

 

Muddy is getting kind of close.  Could you expand on your answer a bit?

i meant on the way to the canyon. out of the millions of visitors to the park a certain percentage never make it due to traffic accidents. but i would still love to pull a thelma and louise but only in a convertable and with a base jumping chute  :hugegrin: i think that would be fun  :thumbsup:

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There were two controlled burns currently taking place on the south rim, which is 10 miles away, going straight across.  The smoke from the burns settled into the canyon over night, looking like fog.  It was amazing watching the sunrise light up first the tops of the peaks, then the east facing canyon walls.

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What about sounds and echos? Is there constant airplane and helicopter noise? Is it muffled distant sounds at daylight or mostly silent. Is there a special or different sound when the wind blows through or over the canyon?

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The lodge at the North Rim is perched right on the rim along Bright Angel Point.  Bright Angel Canyon (which we came up on yesterday) lies to the east and Transecpt Canyon to the west.

We stayed in cabins while at the north rim. These were very comfortable, each having two queen sized, very comfortable beds, bathroom, another small room with a refrigerator, gas fireplace. There were four cabins in each building and each cabin has it's own porch with a couple of rocking chairs.

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If you visit the Grand Canyon, go to the north rim.  As I mentioned before, an average of 5,000,000 people visit the south rim each yeah, whereas only about 200,000 people go to the north rim annually. The south rim is crawling with people, kind of like Disneyland, but the north much more quiet, secluded and remote. This is intentional and the National Park Service intends to keep it that way. 

NorthRim09.thumb.jpg.8350fdec61edf1f227aaedd9d81dbed3.jpg

NorthRim12.thumb.jpg.7d144b2615ec4793ac3d74398174d5bc.jpg

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I could spend hours, even days just looking out over the canyon from the north rim. There are trails that pass right by the lodge, making day hikes very easy. 

Looking with the binoculars...truely amazing.

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Here is the trailhead to the North Kaibab Trail, about 2 miles from the lodge where we came out.  I wanted to see it in the daylight. I am about 10 yards down the trail, my brother is about 20 yards.  Note the drop in elevation just in this picture, which is representative of (but not as steep as) the last 2 miles.

 

And a group shot.

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Sunset brought a completely new perspective.

 

The first picture shows Bright Angel Canyon.  The trail we came up runs along this canyon.  There is actually a fault line located here, which is believed to have first fractured this area, creating a break, which was then eroaded into the canyon by Bright Angel Creek.  If you look at the pictures from the south rim, you can see the canyon as well.

NorthRim21.thumb.jpg.9b270d372c03a908fe32a0a9a89cde93.jpg

NorthRim24.thumb.jpg.dcb5984447ee95b3538ec9ee17b093e1.jpg

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Even after sunset, this place is amazing.  The stars were brighter than I have ever seen.

 

On the sundeck of the lodge is a large fireplace, tall enough that I could stand inside.

NorthRim25.thumb.jpg.f0357ad33ba324515b845b80b88d758e.jpg

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What about sounds and echos? Is there constant airplane and helicopter noise? Is it muffled distant sounds at daylight or mostly silent. Is there a special or different sound when the wind blows through or over the canyon?

The sounds of the canyon have returned to pretty much its natural state.  Since 2000, the NPS and FAA have begun to enforce the "no fly zone" over the canyon. (http://articles.latimes.com/2000/mar/29/news/mn-13772) Even commerical jets at high altitude are not allowed over the main part of the canyon.  Note the lack of con-trails in the pictures.  This adds so much to the experience.  The only time you see or hear a helicopter (only once while I was there) is if NPS goes in for an emergency airlift of someone out of the canyon.

 

On the point were the lodge is located, you hear the wind, but it was calm and smooth as it moved through the trees. There were insects chirping at sundown, but everything seemed very natural.

 

At certain points in the canyon, the echos are wonderful.  Most people are very respectful (or too out of breath to make much noise) while in the canyon. 

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It appears to be an effort designed to be in obtrusive.    :smoke:

The entire area of the north rim is designed to blend into the natural environment and I think the NPS is doing a wonderful job of this.  There are modern conveniences - comfortable beds, hot showers, a very nice sit down restaurant, deli, bar, coffee, etc, which all blend into the surroundings.  There is a paved trail and guard rails leading out to the very end of Bright Angel Point and a couple of other observation points near the lodge, but these do not take away from the natural beauty of the area.

 

From the cabins, a two minute walk, and you are on the rim.

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~ Well thank you once again OFG... I've only seen the canyon from the Air... and for a short moment when a tourist helicoptor landed. I loved your photos! They are wonderful. Thank you so much for bringing me along in such an eloquent way... you've described the experience very well. Now I really am wanting to go!  :thumbup:

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