Jump to content
WildSurvive Forum

Recommended Posts

hey I just watched on national geo channel how they made the skybridge did you go on that

 

~ Wild Horses couldn't drag me onto that sky bridge!  PLEASE say you didn't go on it OFG!  :scared: scared011.gif  I Saw that same documentary Survivorgirl!  It scared the pants off me! I get dizzy looking at it...  I'm so scared of heights!  :unsure:

 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The geology of the Grand Canyon is active and ever changing.  A dramatic example of this is a rock fall that occurred in 1990.  A huge piece of the coconino sandstone layer fell from the far side of Transept Canyon and the results are still visible 11 years later.  This was very dramatic in the early morning, before sunrise. As the area is dimly lit, the lighter colored band of sandstone is clearly visible. At the point of the rockfall, the debris lights up, showing its path all they way down into the canyon.

 

~ The geology of the entire planet is alive, active, and ever changing...  cool14.gif

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Some interesting squirrels.

 

This is a common ground squirrel.  They were cute and bouncing around.

 

There is also a golden mantled ground squirrel there as well, but I never saw one of those.

Ummm might be a chipmunk.

 

http://www.google.com/search?client=flock&channel=fds&q=chipmonk&ie=utf-8&oe=utf-8&aq=t

 

 

http://www.google.com/search?client=flock&channel=fds&q=ground+squirrel&ie=utf-8&oe=utf-8&aq=t

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Aren't chimunks and ground squirrels the same thing?

No. Stripes by the eyes set them apart Ground squirrels are bigger and no stripes that I know of.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

No. Stripes by the eyes set them apart Ground squirrels are bigger and no stripes that I know of.

our ground squirrels hear are tiny little roadside critters, skinny with racing stripes on the backs. they dont look anything like a chipmunk.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Here is the gear I used while hiking the canyon.

 

The boots are Hi-Tec Natal Mid Hikers.  This is the third pair of Hi-Tec hiking boots I have had and all have been very comfortable as well as durable.  I had hiked about 40-50 miles in these prior to the canyon hike to make sure they were broken in and comfortable.

 

Hiking poles are Cabela's Guide Staff hiking poles (Bargain cave for $20.00 each).  I had one and borrowed the other from my son.  I had debated whether to use them at all, one or both, but after doing a couple of the training hikes with two, decided to use both.  I was glad I did, as on the trails they do add much more stability.  Going up hike, they are invaluable.  I might still be in there if I had not had them.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Here are the clothes that I wore:

 

Hat is a US Army issue Hot Weather hat in ACU digital camo that I picked up.  It worked well as I could wear it with the brim up or down. It also has ventilation holes in the top and provided great protection from the sun.

 

The shirt is a Reebok Play Dry moisture wicking shirt.  This was cool and comfortable and rinsed out nicely in the stream. The white one is also a Reebok long sleeve shirt that I wore over the other at the start and end of the hike.  Both are very light.

 

Shorts are Columbia hiking shorts.

 

Socks are Merino wool hiking socks. I started with the light brown Gander Mountain medium weight hikers and switched to the REI light hikers a little over half way through.  You definitely want at least two pair and I would go with light hikers - no need for the mediums.

 

Watch is a Timex Expedition with digital compass and paracord band (this has about 12 feet of cord) and the paracord bracelets have another 8-10 feet of cord.

 

Not pictured are my sunglasses and case, which really should be a requirement.

I also have my glasses and contact lens case along in case I needed to take them out.

Clothing.thumb.jpg.977548302c59dcc88bcd8d9df8436792.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The pack I used is a CamelBak Transformer with a 3.1 liter bladder.  Personally, I would not go in with anything less than that.  I really like this pack as it has three different sections that you can mix and match for what you need. 

 

I removed the smaller pod as the main bladder section and the second pod had plenty of room for what I needed to take.  The back has to rows of MOLLE webbing for attaching whatever (there is a Grimlock attached).

 

The shoulder straps offer multiple attachment points as well.  On the right, I carry my Buck Xtract multitool. Just below that is the clip for my GPSr.  On the left I attach a flashlight (which was stowed when not needed) and a paracord lanyard (15 feet of paracord) that attaches to my GPSr.  I have woven a compass into this and also have a small thermometer on the end.

 

Being an old fat guy, I have added a paracord extension to the waist strap, adding another 25 feet of cordage. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

For navigation, I had my Garmin Map60 CSx with the topographic maps for the area.  As the trails were well defined, I used this mainly to keep track of distance and altitude.

 

I had a lensatic compass, another small compass in my GPS lanyard and an electronic compass in my watch.  I have a small thermometer along to keep track of the temperature.  I had a topographic map of the Grand Canyon with the trails marked, just in case.

 

For shelter, I had two Heat Sheets, which are heavier emergency blankets.  I had a rain poncho, just in case and two bandannas, which came in very useful to keep the sweat from running into my eyes and for cooling off in the stream.

Shelter.thumb.jpg.4b0c00acad026f0f663f5a46ff633d3f.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

In case I needed to make a fire, I had a number of things along. First of all, a small Bic lighter I picked up after we got to Arizona.

Next I have my Light My Fire firesteel and striker. Attached to that is a P51 can opener, which also works very well as a striker.

In this kit, I also keep a small magnifying glass (and another in my wallet).

 

There was plenty of tinder to be found if needed, but I also had some fatwood, a tin of char cloth I made last summer and a bottle of dryer lint soaked in petroleum jelly.  The grey packet is "Wetfire" tinder, which I found in the hotel room the night before.

 

A small notepad is at the upper right left.  Everything other than the fatwood fits in the canvas pouch.

 

Next is my first aid kit and CPR mouth shield. Others in my group had a snake bit kit.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

For lights, I had two flashlights and a headlamp, all of which used AAA batteries.  I had extra batteries along as well as two additional sets of AA batteries for my GPSr.

 

I also has a set of two glow sticks, just in case.

 

In addition to the cordage I had on the straps, lanyards, etc, I had about 25 feet of paracord and another 12 feet of the brown paracord with the Nite-Eze figure 9 carabiners. 

 

I small bottle of hand santizer (which will take a spark) and a ziplock bag of paper towels were in my pack too.

Lights.thumb.jpg.ed520e6efe96f526680a6e1bcfade35e.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

There were a number of water stops along the way and I made sure to keep my CamelBak filled.  In addition, I had a lexan bottle along to mix up Gatoraid. This worked well to store the Gatoraid packets and attached to the outside of the pack. 

 

I packed a lot of items that went in the main section of the pack into the canteen cup. This would have worked for boiling water or cooking, if needed.  The Light My Fire fork and spoon would have made dining out in the Canyon civilized.

 

I included water purification tablets, again, just in case.  The streams looked clean and clear, but you never know.

Water1.thumb.jpg.7cfbe37cabbdc174a11a5d7dcb146f2c.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I had three knifes with me.

 

My Cold Steel Roach Belly was on my belt and got the most use for opening lunch, etc. 

 

I had my Buck Summit (the blue one) in my pocket.  You will notice that I did manage to break off the cork screw while opening a bottle of wine on the north rim.

 

Attached to the shoulder strap on my pack is my Buck Xtract (top, black) multitool.

 

I also had 3-4 pens and a sharpie in my pack in case I needed to write any thing.

 

Before we started, we all went over where our ID's would be, insurance cards, emergency phone numbers, etc, again, just in case.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

All of this made it into my pack.

 

For food, I carried two peanut butter sandwiches, cut in half in ziplock bags. As soon as one bag was empty, it was used for garbage.

 

I had 4 fun size Snickers bars, which are said to be "the best hiking food", as they have a nice mix of carbohydrates, sugar and protein.  I ate mine before noon so they wouldn't melt.

 

I had 6 Cliff bars of various flavors - 200 calories each.

 

I used 6 packets of G2 Gatoraid which is lower in sugar and has the electrolytes you need to replace when sweating.  These mixed with 20oz of water, which is what my orange bottle held.

 

I also had 3-4 packets of GU, which is an easily digestible jell that looks to be mostly sugar and tastes like...well...goo.

 

Starting weight of my pack with a full bladder of water (6.6 pounds) was right at 20 pounds.

 

During the hike, I calculated that I burned between 13,000 and 14,000 calories.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Great gear list. What was the total weight?

Pack is right at 20 pounds (including 6.6 pound of water).  I'm about 260, boots are about 2 pounds each, guessing another 5 for clothes and stuff in my pockets, poles, just under a pound each...total about 285-290.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now

×