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mistwalker

New Firesteel (polySTRIKER XL by Exotac)

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Yesterday started out as a rather nasty day by most people’s standards, rainy, foggy, and dreary…my favorite kind of day most of the time, so I headed to a favorite spot to get some work done in peace.

 

This was the office for the day.

 

DSC_8492.jpg

 

IMG_0154.jpg

 

 

 

 

 

The conditions were nice and atmospheric.

 

DSC_8345.jpg

 

DSC_8375.jpg

 

DSC_8379.jpg

 

DSC_8381.jpg

 

DSC_8348.jpg

 

DSC_8349.jpg

 

DSC_8384.jpg

 

DSC_8512.jpg

 

 

 

 

 

And I MUCH preferred the wooded environment to the scenes in town…I feel much safer in the woods!!

 

DSC_8326.jpg

 

DSC_8327.jpg

 

 

 

 

 

By the time I needed to recharge the laptop battery I was ready to go for a walk and check out some new gear. I had been waiting for a chance to take a new fire starter out to the woods ever since I got to check out the prototype back at Blade. Exotac is producing a couple of new ferro rods called polySTRIKERS, and I really liked the concept as a replacement for my worn and aging LMF Army model because of the larger handle and the striker that stores in the handle. It has a total length of 5-5/16”, and 2” long by 5/16” dia. ferro rod

 

DSC_8479.jpg

 

 

 

 

Here are a couple of comparison pics; the first with a Primus Igniter, and a LMF Scout model, and the other with an Exotac nano XL. The striker is the same design as on the nano models but a good bit larger.

 

DSC_8354.jpg

 

DSC_8369.jpg

 

DSC_8367.jpg

 

 

 

 

 

As you can see the striker snaps into and is stored in the handle, rather than dangling on the cord like some others on the market. I just use my thumb to push it out from the back.

 

IMG_0159.jpg

 

IMG_0160.jpg

 

DSC_8483.jpg

 

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I like how both the rod and striker have large handles that are nice and grippy, I think they’ll be great for bad weather.

 

DSC_8419.jpg

 

DSC_8421.jpg

 

DSC_8425.jpg

 

DSC_8424.jpg

 

 

 

 

Considering it was late afternoon already, the two days of rain and mist had everything soaked, and with the cloud cover it would get dark fast when the sun went behind the mountain, I opted to take the easy way out and just use a piece of the resin rich dead pine laying around.

 

DSC_8395.jpg

 

DSC_8391.jpg

 

DSC_8397.jpg

 

 

 

 

 

This stuff is great when speed is a factor because it really doesn’t matter how wet everything is, and even in the rain the ability to start fire is only limited by your ability to split enough of this stuff to get it going. This was the prep. I found a dead tree to use as a splitting block because the ground is so saturated that doing it on the ground would only serve to drive the pieces into the ground. The density of this material is such that it often splits to points at each end or the piece and I find it easier to just stab it on a side or drive the knife through it in chisel fashion. On longer pieces you just drive the knife through then twist the blade and it splits apart.

 

DSC_8405.jpg 

 

DSC_8406.jpg

 

DSC_8408.jpg

 

DSC_8413.jpg

 

DSC_8410.jpg

 

DSC_8415.jpg

 

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With the base ready, the resin rich wood split down into smaller pieces, and the fuel gathered, then it’s just a matter of whittling a little pile of shavings, sparking the fire to life, and adding the kindling and fuel to have fire. A small amount of the resin rich pine will catch quickly and produce a lot of heat. The polySTRIKER did really well. It was easy, and comfortable, to keep a nice secure purchase on the handles and direct the sparks right where I needed them. The striker works really well and throws a lot of sparkes, three strikes and I had flames.

 

DSC_8437.jpg

 

DSC_8438.jpg 

 

DSC_8440.jpg

 

DSC_8441.jpg

 

DSC_8444.jpg

 

 

 

 

 

The soaking wet wood puts off a lot of steam, but with the high heat it soon dries and once you have a bed of coals going the battle to keep the fire going is a lot easier.

 

DSC_8446.jpg

 

DSC_8448.jpg

 

DSC_8464-1.jpg

 

DSC_8467.jpg

 

DSC_8476.jpg

 

DSC_8477.jpg

 

 

 

 

 

The Poly Striker offers a great positive grip and packs a lot of punch for a fire starter that weighs only 1.4oz. And then this shot just because I like it.

 

DSC_8435.jpg

 

 

.

 

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Nice review Mist. Looks good. Like the OverLander also.

 

Thanks Tatonka, I'm liking it really well. Liking the knife too. It's the same size as my RC & ESEE 3s but with a thicker blade.

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Great review, Mist!  I'm with Tatonka, I like both the polySTRIKER and the Overlander.

 

Thanks KBob, I've been waiting on the fire starter for months but I like them both quite well myself.

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Guest smallgamehunter

excellent review mist i like the way the striker stores

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excellent review mist i like the way the striker stores

 

Thanks SGH, glad you enjoyed it. I really like the storing of the striker in the handle too, makes for a few different options.

 

 

Thanks, Mist.

 

Hey, any time  :) I'm always out playing with one piece of gear or another...

 

 

awsome mist! i really like the heavy duty striker on it.

 

Thanks RS, I do too, man it really throws some sparks!!

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The have finally got the new Exotac products here in the UK and the first batch has been distributed to some of our Outdoor retailers with more to be shipped out in the New Year. The polySTRIKER is a great bit of kit and is going to give the the LMF fire steel a run for its money.

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The have finally got the new Exotac products here in the UK and the first batch has been distributed to some of our Outdoor retailers with more to be shipped out in the New Year. The polySTRIKER is a great bit of kit and is going to give the the LMF fire steel a run for its money.

 

I like the longer handle of the Poly Striker better than the short handle of the LMF. I think it's going to be a lot easier to work with when hands are cold or fatigued, and it throws some really hot sparks. 

 

 

~ great post mistwalker! (as usual.)  awsome pics too.  :thumbup:  Nice Office you got there... good design, looks like it could double as a break room as well. lol  :)

 

Thanks Taken! Yeah, it has been a break room more than once  :hugegrin:

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I see that the Polystriker is the XL. I like those and the new Nano's look good also.

 

Yeah, I should probably put the XL in the title...

 

And the nano XL is a major improvement over the original nano.

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Yesterday started out as a rather nasty day by most people’s standards, rainy, foggy, and dreary…my favorite kind of day most of the time, so I headed to a favorite spot to get some work done in peace.

 

This was the office for the day.

 

DSC_8492.jpg

 

IMG_0154.jpg

 

 

 

 

 

The conditions were nice and atmospheric.

 

DSC_8345.jpg

 

DSC_8375.jpg

 

DSC_8379.jpg

 

DSC_8381.jpg

 

DSC_8348.jpg

 

DSC_8349.jpg

 

DSC_8384.jpg

 

DSC_8512.jpg

 

 

 

 

 

And I MUCH preferred the wooded environment to the scenes in town…I feel much safer in the woods!!

 

DSC_8326.jpg

 

DSC_8327.jpg

 

 

 

 

 

By the time I needed to recharge the laptop battery I was ready to go for a walk and check out some new gear. I had been waiting for a chance to take a new fire starter out to the woods ever since I got to check out the prototype back at Blade. Exotac is producing a couple of new ferro rods called polySTRIKERS, and I really liked the concept as a replacement for my worn and aging LMF Army model because of the larger handle and the striker that stores in the handle. It has a total length of 5-5/16”, and 2” long by 5/16” dia. ferro rod

 

DSC_8479.jpg

 

 

 

 

Here are a couple of comparison pics; the first with a Primus Igniter, and a LMF Scout model, and the other with an Exotac nano XL. The striker is the same design as on the nano models but a good bit larger.

 

DSC_8354.jpg

 

DSC_8369.jpg

 

DSC_8367.jpg

 

 

 

 

 

As you can see the striker snaps into and is stored in the handle, rather than dangling on the cord like some others on the market. I just use my thumb to push it out from the back.

 

IMG_0159.jpg

 

IMG_0160.jpg

 

DSC_8483.jpg

 

DSC_8484.jpg

 

 

 

 

I like how both the rod and striker have large handles that are nice and grippy, I think they’ll be great for bad weather.

 

DSC_8419.jpg

 

DSC_8421.jpg

 

DSC_8425.jpg

 

DSC_8424.jpg

 

 

 

 

Considering it was late afternoon already, the two days of rain and mist had everything soaked, and with the cloud cover it would get dark fast when the sun went behind the mountain, I opted to take the easy way out and just use a piece of the resin rich dead pine laying around.

 

DSC_8395.jpg

 

DSC_8391.jpg

 

DSC_8397.jpg

 

 

 

 

 

This stuff is great when speed is a factor because it really doesn’t matter how wet everything is, and even in the rain the ability to start fire is only limited by your ability to split enough of this stuff to get it going. This was the prep. I found a dead tree to use as a splitting block because the ground is so saturated that doing it on the ground would only serve to drive the pieces into the ground. The density of this material is such that it often splits to points at each end or the piece and I find it easier to just stab it on a side or drive the knife through it in chisel fashion. On longer pieces you just drive the knife through then twist the blade and it splits apart.

 

DSC_8405.jpg 

 

DSC_8406.jpg

 

DSC_8408.jpg

 

DSC_8413.jpg

 

DSC_8410.jpg

 

DSC_8415.jpg

 

DSC_8417.jpg

 

DSC_8416.jpg

 

 

 

 

 

With the base ready, the resin rich wood split down into smaller pieces, and the fuel gathered, then it’s just a matter of whittling a little pile of shavings, sparking the fire to life, and adding the kindling and fuel to have fire. A small amount of the resin rich pine will catch quickly and produce a lot of heat. The polySTRIKER did really well. It was easy, and comfortable, to keep a nice secure purchase on the handles and direct the sparks right where I needed them. The striker works really well and throws a lot of sparkes, three strikes and I had flames.

 

DSC_8437.jpg

 

DSC_8438.jpg 

 

DSC_8440.jpg

 

DSC_8441.jpg

 

DSC_8444.jpg

 

 

 

 

 

The soaking wet wood puts off a lot of steam, but with the high heat it soon dries and once you have a bed of coals going the battle to keep the fire going is a lot easier.

 

DSC_8446.jpg

 

DSC_8448.jpg

 

DSC_8464-1.jpg

 

DSC_8467.jpg

 

DSC_8476.jpg

 

DSC_8477.jpg

 

 

 

 

 

The Poly Striker offers a great positive grip and packs a lot of punch for a fire starter that weighs only 1.4oz. And then this shot just because I like it.

 

DSC_8435.jpg

 

 

.

 

WOW!! This was extremely well documented great job.

 

You must have a bitchin camera because those pictures look awesome!!

 

Thanks a lot for the post.

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Quick question how does the Exotac nano XL work for you? I'm thinking of getting one.

 

I mreally love the XL, it's miles better than the original just with the larger rod and larger striker. If the Ti version on my key ring wasn't one of the two first made and I hadn't had it so long I'd replace it with an XL as it is I have the orange XL in a neck knife kit and am getting a green one soon.

 

 

WOW!! This was extremely well documented great job.

 

You must have a bitchin camera because those pictures look awesome!!

 

Thanks a lot for the post.

 

Thanks man, I guess as a bi-product of my writing and my work in R&D I get a little carried away with the photos sometimes...I just want them to be clear and easy to understand. I love my camera.

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