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wingman115

Ground Squirrel Hunting Video

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****DISCLAIMER!!! THIS IS A HUNTING VIDEO. IF HUNTING DISTURBS YOU PLEASE DON'T WATCH THE VIDEO.

 

My buddy Mike and I had the day off so we decided to head on up to the woods for a ground squirrel hunt. We started out the day with wet weather but as we got closer to the mountains the weather cleared up enough to make it a great day out in the wood.

 

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I consider myself a hunter, but I am unsure of going out and killing an animal just for the sake of killing it.  I guess in that area, ground squirrels are considered a pest animal and may carry plague.  However aren't they native to the area and living in their natural habitat?  I guess I'll have to think about this one for a while.  I really don't like the idea of going out "hunting", but then leaving the dead animal lay.

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There was a part that didn't make the edit in the video talking about where we were hunting was free range land on forest service land for cattle. The wind noise on the video was so bad I had to leave it out of the video.

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Maybe it would be better termed "pest control" or something along those lines.

 

Also, who was there first?  I believe the squirrels are indigenous whereas the cattle and the plague were brought over from Europe.

 

Again, just my thoughts.

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This is varmint or pest control. Pretty much the same thing as the taking of prairie dogs, gophers, coyotes, rats, etc. In Wingmans defense he did WARN everyone at least twice before anyone has a chance to start watching the video  that animal were being killed. I am not saying I am OK killing all animals and leaving them lay because I am not OK with that, but there is times when a pest must be controlled sometimes by man if nature does not provide enough predators. Just my opinion and you know what people say about opinions. 

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I'm with you OFG... I love to hunt, but it drives me nuts the cityits that come around to kill something and leave it lay there to rot. If your not goin to eat it or make bait, don't kill it. not directed at you wingman... Nice video :)

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I'm with you OFG... I love to hunt, but it drives me nuts the cityits that come around to kill something and leave it lay there to rot. If your not goin to eat it or make bait, don't kill it. not directed at you wingman... Nice video :)

No harm no foul. Thanks for checking it out. I respect everyones opinion.

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No harm no foul. Thanks for checking it out. I respect everyones opinion.

 

I watched the video twice and payed more attention. Your 100% right about pest control, we have big problem here with woodchucks. They destroy pastures and injure livestock. The coyote population here has exploded from no natural predator. The DEC has brought in mountain lion families to certain areas to help controll it.

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I agree that there are cases where pest control may be needed.  However, I could see someone looking at this video, titled "Hunting", and get the impression that hunters go into the woods to wantonly slaughter wildlife. 

I don't think this is at all your intent with this video, but I think people could either get the wrong impression or use it as an argument against hunting by taking it completely out of context.

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Human plague risks can be reduced by:

· Rodentproofing

homes

· Removing structures that provide shelter for rodents

· Limiting rodent access to water and food sources near homes

· Avoiding sick or dead animals and rodents nests or burrows

· Using insect repellents

· Preventing pets from hunting

· Using caution when handling sick cats (which should be examined and treated by a

veterinarian)

· Treating pet dogs and cats with effective flea repellents to prevent transport of infected

fleas into the home.

Control of wild rodent populations on a large scale is not feasible or ecologically desirable, but

some control or reduction in local populations can be achieved in time through elimination of

rodent food sources and shelter around human habitation. In the event that rodenticides are used,

they should not be applied until an aggressive flea control campaign has been implemented. Killing rodent hosts without first eliminating fleas is likely to increase the risk of a human plague case.

 

That's my only concern. Bubonic plague bacterium have developed a co-existance with the fleas and the host animals that they "occassionally" infect. Only during extreme population explosions does the plague kill off multiple animals, and that's historically when the fleas jump species to feed on other animals that are in close proximity.  That's just natures way. Most humans are infected by Cats, who become hosts to the fleas when the ground squirrels are over-populating near suburban areas. It's only a major threat when a human catches Pneumonic Plague... in pneumonia form. Sick and sneezing cats are the culprit. They go out, and they hunt, (or scavenge)  and they catch it and bring it back home.

 

I understand that the burrows can pose a hazard to domestic livestock, but was that land used for livestock?  :unsure: 

 

If you're going to kill a rock squirrel in the name of environmental health, then you have to understand that your bullet doesn't kill the flea that harbors the disease. (if their particular fleas even carried the disease) which we won't know because you didn't gather the animals for state testing. (That might be beneficial... but dangerous.) 

 

Just realize that when you remove the natural host of the real "bad guy" (the infected flea) you are opening up a situation in which a new host must be sought, and it might not be a host that has developed a natural resistence to the plague.

 

What we do to one part of the web, shakes the whole thing. So if you enjoy shooting the varments, then do the county a favor, and collect their bodies for further research. And follow up on the results. Not all ground squirrel fleas carry plague. when they feel ill they often die deep in their burrows where scavenging carnivores can't find them, or be infected by them.

 

that's just my two cents worth.

 

Carry on.  :arigato:

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Human plague risks can be reduced by:

· Rodentproofing

homes

· Removing structures that provide shelter for rodents

· Limiting rodent access to water and food sources near homes

· Avoiding sick or dead animals and rodents nests or burrows

· Using insect repellents

· Preventing pets from hunting

· Using caution when handling sick cats (which should be examined and treated by a

veterinarian)

· Treating pet dogs and cats with effective flea repellents to prevent transport of infected

fleas into the home.

Control of wild rodent populations on a large scale is not feasible or ecologically desirable, but

some control or reduction in local populations can be achieved in time through elimination of

rodent food sources and shelter around human habitation. In the event that rodenticides are used,

they should not be applied until an aggressive flea control campaign has been implemented. Killing rodent hosts without first eliminating fleas is likely to increase the risk of a human plague case.

 

That's my only concern. Bubonic plague bacterium have developed a co-existance with the fleas and the host animals that they "occassionally" infect. Only during extreme population explosions does the plague kill off multiple animals, and that's historically when the fleas jump species to feed on other animals that are in close proximity.  That's just natures way. Most humans are infected by Cats, who become hosts to the fleas when the ground squirrels are over-populating near suburban areas. It's only a major threat when a human catches Pneumonic Plague... in pneumonia form. Sick and sneezing cats are the culprit. They go out, and they hunt, (or scavenge)  and they catch it and bring it back home.

 

I understand that the burrows can pose a hazard to domestic livestock, but was that land used for livestock?  :unsure: 

 

If you're going to kill a rock squirrel in the name of environmental health, then you have to understand that your bullet doesn't kill the flea that harbors the disease. (if their particular fleas even carried the disease) which we won't know because you didn't gather the animals for state testing. (That might be beneficial... but dangerous.) 

 

Just realize that when you remove the natural host of the real "bad guy" (the infected flea) you are opening up a situation in which a new host must be sought, and it might not be a host that has developed a natural resistence to the plague.

 

What we do to one part of the web, shakes the whole thing. So if you enjoy shooting the varments, then do the county a favor, and collect their bodies for further research. And follow up on the results. Not all ground squirrel fleas carry plague. when they feel ill they often die deep in their burrows where scavenging carnivores can't find them, or be infected by them.

 

that's just my two cents worth.

 

Carry on.  :arigato:

Great info thanks for sharing.

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Great info thanks for sharing.

 

~ I guess the gist of what I'm saying is that if you're hunting them anyway, (I know they do state testing to keep up with the situation) it might be beneficial to bag'em and tag'em and send them into the state health department or Department of natural resources for testing. That way innocent scavengers wont be inadvertantly exposed, and your state researchers might gain some valuable insight from your efforts. It just seems less wasteful.  :thumbup:

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~ I guess the gist of what I'm saying is that if you're hunting them anyway, (I know they do state testing to keep up with the situation) it might be beneficial to bag'em and tag'em and send them into the state health department or Department of natural resources for testing. That way innocent scavengers wont be inadvertantly exposed, and your state researchers might gain some valuable insight from your efforts. It just seems less wasteful.  :thumbup:

Makes sense and would seem to be a lot more beneficial.  I have also read that when the a ground squirrel colony is infected with plague, it can kill them off.

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Very interesting Taken... I never looked at it as the flea being the culprit... Now youve got me thinking of my cats, I have two here to keep critters away from the house. Granted I'M in their home.

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Very interesting Taken... I never looked at it as the flea being the culprit... Now youve got me thinking of my cats, I have two here to keep critters away from the house. Granted I'M in their home.

 

~  Hiker.... my daughter says you need to "cowboy it up" and shoot the cats. (Joking...I hope.)

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An interesting news article...

 

http://www.cnn.com/2012/10/09/us/california-squirrel-plague/index.html?eref=mrss_igoogle_cnn

 

"(CNN) -- Authorities in Riverside County, California, said Tuesday that a ground squirrel has tested positive for exposure to fleas infected with the bacteria that can cause plague.

 

It's the country's first positive test in more than a decade, according to Dottie Merki, environmental health program chief at the Riverside County Department of Environmental Health."

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