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We are hoping for some good clear skys this year.  The Perseid shower is one of our favorites.  A couple years back we had perfect clear skys and laid on blankets for hours watching.

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Thanks we are heading up to New York State camping for the week hopefully we will get some clear sky's and low light

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were were  8|

Early in the morning, just before sunrise, very close to Mars and Spica.

 

However, it appears that the comet got fried on its loop close to the sun. Its "ghost" has been picked up on some satellite images, but is is fading fast.

 

I was never able to find it.  :cry: :cry: :cry:

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Early in the morning, just before sunrise, very close to Mars and Spica.

 

However, it appears that the comet got fried on its loop close to the sun. Its "ghost" has been picked up on some satellite images, but is is fading fast.

 

I was never able to find it.  :cry: :cry: :cry:

 

~ awww....  happy100.gif  I know how you love to stare at the sky too.  :(

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Yeah, I was bummed that it got fried. That's what happens when you get within 684,000 miles of the sun going 843,000 mph. It is still possible that a large bright tail might form.  Time will tell.

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Looks like this will be worth getting up early for:

 

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. (AP) — North and South America, get ready for the first eclipse of the year— in color.

 

Next Tuesday (April 13, 2014) morning, the moon will be eclipsed by Earth's shadow. This total lunar eclipse will be visible across the Western Hemisphere. The total phase will last 78 minutes, beginning at 3:06 a.m. EDT and ending at 4:24 a.m. EDT.

 

  ::pbjt::

 

(Here is your link dancing banana.)

 

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Lyrids

Active from April 16th to 25th 2014

The Lyrids are a medium strength shower that usually produces good rates for three nights centered on the maximum. These meteors also usually lack persistent trains but can produce fireballs. These meteors are best seen from the northern hemisphere where the radiant is high in the sky at dawn. Activity from this shower can be seen from the southern hemisphere, but at a lower rate.

 

Here is a 2014 Meteor Shower Calendar.

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Looks like this will be worth getting up early for:

 

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. (AP) — North and South America, get ready for the first eclipse of the year— in color.

 

Next Tuesday (April 13, 2014) morning, the moon will be eclipsed by Earth's shadow. This total lunar eclipse will be visible across the Western Hemisphere. The total phase will last 78 minutes, beginning at 3:06 a.m. EDT and ending at 4:24 a.m. EDT.

 

  ::pbjt::

 

(Here is your link dancing banana.)

 

 

~ Why is it ALWAYS in the middle of the night??

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~ April 13th is on a Sunday.....  :huh:

Ok, I will reschedule this for Tuesday, April 15, 2014, 3:06 AM EDT. Will that work better for you?

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~ Why is it ALWAYS in the middle of the night??

It is always during a full moon, because the Earth must be between the Sun and the Moon for this to happen.

 

Besides, if it happened in the middle of the day, you wouldn't see it.  lol

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A great opportunity for viewing planets over the next couple of days.  Right after sunset, you will see a very bright object in the west. This is Venus.  Just to the right of Venus you will see another relatively bright object. This is Mercury. Mercury is not visible that often and very seldom this bright and easy to find.

 

Now, if you follow the track of the sun upward, you will find a bright, reddish object. This is Mars.

 

About two hours later, Jupiter will rise in the east.

 

There is also a comet that is now just barely visible with the naked eye.  If you find the constellation Orion, then follow the three stars of the belt to the right, the comet is in this general area. You will need to look closely for a fuzzy ball of light.

 

For those early risers, by 6am, Jupiter will be very bright in the west, the moon will be almost over head and to the left, the brightest object you will see is Saturn.

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