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Chicory Root Coffee

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This very common plant is actually edible from flower to root. (Raw or Cooked)  But it can also be made to make coffee.

 

Dig up the roots of 10 to 20 plants. You’re looking for roughly a half-pound of roots for a good sized batch. Cut the tops from the roots, but save the tops. You can sauté the tops in butter or oil to make a vitamin-rich cooked green.

 

Preheat your oven to 350 F while you wash the dirt off your roots, and cut them into half-inch bits. Spread the roots on a cookie sheet and bake until the roots are chocolate brown, and almost about to start burning. This usually takes 30 to 40 minutes, but watch them closely, as you don’t want them to actually burn.

 

You can either freeze these or they will last up to a month in a breathable container.

 

To make chicory coffee, pour boiling water into a coffee mug and add one tablespoon of roasted chicory root for every 8 ounces of water used. Cover the mug with a saucer or some other lid. Let the brew steep for 10 minutes. Finally, sweeten it to your taste and enjoy your drink.

 

This is just one of the many uses for Chicory.  Another is that its actually got medicinal purposes as well.  Chicory is harmful to internal parasites which is a great thing out in the field!

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Sounds interesting.  Of course, some people around here would want to leave the dirt on...

 

Its not a bad coffee but dont expect it to taste like Maxwell House lol

 

But theres alot of common plants here on the east coast that have tons of uses. 

 

Where are you from?

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LOL Based on the time it took me to hike the Grand Canyon, I thought it appropriate to wear that shirt on the north rim the following day.

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LOL Based on the time it took me to hike the Grand Canyon, I thought it appropriate to wear that shirt on the north rim the following day.

 

Awesome lol

 

How long did it take you?

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Our roads in Illinois are lined with that plant. I love the color and cant accept it called a weed here.

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ive roasted the root and made coffee. it works, ive also roasted dandilion root for coffee substitute. its a little better to my tast but mixing the two makes it a little better. bad thing is i dont belive there is any caffeen  :disgust:

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ive roasted the root and made coffee. it works, ive also roasted dandilion root for coffee substitute. its a little better to my tast but mixing the two makes it a little better. bad thing is i dont belive there is any caffeen  :disgust:

 

Yea Chicory is prepared the same way Dandelions are.

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"ive roasted the root and made coffee. it works, ive also roasted dandilion root for coffee substitute. its a little better to my tast but mixing the two makes it a little better. bad thing is i dont belive there is any caffeen" 

 

 

True, there is no caffeine.  My research indicates that the only North American native plant that produces caffeine is the Yaupon Holly in the southeastern coastal regions.  It can be used to make a coffee substitute but is very strong.  The local Native Americans used it ceremonially before the Europeans came.  I'm trying to locate a source for some of the plants now.  I want several to plant around the edge of my yard so if coffee becomes unavailable, I'll still have a source of my favorite drug: caffeine.

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ive roasted the root and made coffee. it works, ive also roasted dandilion root for coffee substitute. its a little better to my tast but mixing the two makes it a little better. bad thing is i dont belive there is any caffeen  :disgust:

 

As far as I have been able to discover, the only plant native to North America that produces caffeine is the Yaupon Holly native to the southeastern coastal states.  I have been looking for a source to buy six or eight trees to plant around my house in case coffee ever gets scarce.

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"ive roasted the root and made coffee. it works, ive also roasted dandilion root for coffee substitute. its a little better to my tast but mixing the two makes it a little better. bad thing is i dont belive there is any caffeen" 

 

 

True, there is no caffeine.  My research indicates that the only North American native plant that produces caffeine is the Yaupon Holly in the southeastern coastal regions.  It can be used to make a coffee substitute but is very strong.  The local Native Americans used it ceremonially before the Europeans came.  I'm trying to locate a source for some of the plants now.  I want several to plant around the edge of my yard so if coffee becomes unavailable, I'll still have a source of my favorite drug: caffeine.

 

Looks like we are on the same wavelength.  I posted almost the identical statement right before I found yours.

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