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A possible winter survival food could be turtle. Turtles, as everyone should know, are reptiles, which are cold-blooded. Which means they can't regulate their body temperature, so they hibernate.Turtles enter into a phase much like hibernation in the winter, choosing to bury themselves in the mud and remain there until breeding season.

 

A good source in winter is a natural spring. Find where a spring runs out and forms a wet spot and a possible puddle or small pond. Turtles will bury themselves in the mud in these places in the winter months. Spring water remains under freezing temperatures because of being in the earth. Therefor it will remain unfrozen all winter and warm enough for the turtles to survive in a hibernating state.

 

Once you have found a possible location probe the mud with a slender stick. If you hit one it will be a solid hollow sounding thump. Then all you need to do is dig him out. There may be several turtles in the same area so keep probing.

 

Also turtles can be found through clear ice on a pond , lake or swamp. Here you can walk the shallow end and spot the turtle half buried in the mud. Some hunters carry a metal rod to stab through the ice into the back of the turtle then chop them out. They are very slow and sluggish so you can chip the ice with a knife or chop through if your lucky enough to have a hatchet or axe or just pound through with a wooden stick or club.

 

Butchering a turtle is not easy especially in a winter outdoor situation. Some simply place the turtle on its back in the coals.

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Interesting info, Swede. 

I'm still having a hard time believing there would be a turtle out wandering around in the snow though.

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During hibernation, the turtle’s system slows way down and it no longer uses its lungs for respiration. The turtle absorbs any oxygen it needs from the water around it, through the lining of its mouth or throat. The chemical composition of the turtle’s blood changes so it doesn’t freeze up when the metabolism is so slow.

 

In some instances, a turtle—or group of turtles—will use the same hibernating spot from winter to winter. Some, like painted turtles, might emerge from hibernation if there is a warm spell, but if a turtle emerges from hibernation too soon, and there is a sudden dip in temperature, it might not survive. Some turtles have been observed crawling under the ice in mid- to late winter. Hibernation is generally over sometime in March or April. After hibernation, turtles will reproduce and nest during late spring and early summer.

 

http://srel.uga.edu/ecoviews/ecoview070311.htm

 

http://suite101.com/article/where-do-turtles-go-in-winter-a86524

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Thanks Offtrail. We used to do a lot of hand fishing and I put my hand on a big snapping turtle one time. I just waited till he moved hoping that turtles dont have a reverse. Then I held my breath and reached down and grabbed his tail.  gen165.gif

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I never had the desire to hand fish, don't like putting my hands where I can't see them  scared011.gif I have found turtles and frogs by poking around in the mud with a stick. In winter when other foods are scarce this is a great way to find extra calories :thumbup:

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