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Venison Jerky from roasts.

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Venison Jerky from roast

 

I started out with about 8 pounds of hind quarters cut into roast. These were frozen for at least 60 days. I thawed these for 3-4 hours, so they were still frozen, but just starting to thaw.  This makes it quite easy to cut into thin slices. When making jerky this way, I think the thinner the slices the better.

 

These roasts are from a pretty good sized buck.

 

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The Cold Steel Long Hunter that Swede gave me works wonderfully for this job.  It is long enough to give plenty of leverage when cutting through the frozen meat. It also holds a wonderfully sharp edge.

 

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Some of the slices from the roast come out rather large, so once they are sliced, I will cut them again, reducing the width.

 

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Note that venison is very lean with no "marbling" (fat is mixed in the the meat) like it beef.  You can use the same process to make beef jerky, but use the leanest cuts available and trim off as much fat as possible.

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Now that the meat is sliced, you next need to mix up the marinade.  I like the High Mountain seasonings, along with some extras.

 

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The Worcestershire sauce adds a nice flavor and a little bit of spice. The acid in the lemon juice will tendorize the meat.  I also will add Tabasco sauce along with some of my "toxic waste" to give it some zing.

 

I use about half the amount of cure (which is primarily salt).

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(This batch turned out to have plenty of "ZING", so I will need to remember to cut back on the toxic waste next time. )

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Then I add the liquids and mix well, adding water as needed.

 

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Then pour it over the sliced meat.

 

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Mix well and let the meat sit at least over night in the refridgerator to allow the marinade to soak in.

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Every couple of hours, it should be stirred, so I put this in a sealed tupperware container and shake it and roll it around.  Here it is the next morning after it has been mixed and stirred a number of times.

 

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Lay the strips of meat flat on the dehydrator trays.

 

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After the meat is laid out, I like to give it a light sprinkling of Luzianne Canjan Seasoning.

 

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Using this method, I will get about 12-14 ounces of meat on each tray (My dehydrator has 4 trays.).

 

Close up the dehydrator and set it at 185 degrees.  It will take about three hours per batch to dry down.

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They drying time will vary depending on the thickness of the slices.  I will go through after about three hours, pulling out the thinner slices and allowing the thicker ones to dry for a while longer.

 

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The jerky will dry down to about half the original weight of the meat. 

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damn that looks good Ofg. about the only thing I do different is put the meat in 1 gallon zip lock bags and get as much air out as possible. then massage it every couple hours. I sure hope you save me a piece  :hugegrin:

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I personally don't like using Ziplock bags to marinade.  One hole and you end up with a mess in the fridge.  For me, using the large Tupperware container makes it easy to mix larger batches by rolling it around and shaking it (Just make sure to hold the top on.).  This was about 8 pounds of meat that was originally frozen in two - one gallon Ziplock bags.

 

The larger container with a lid also makes it easy to get the meat out when you are putting it in the dehydrator.  Get out what you need to refill the dehydrator, put the lid back on and back in the fridge.  A lot of times, I will start out with seasoning that normal people can tolerate, then add additional zing to the later batches.

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I personally don't like using Ziplock bags to marinade.  One hole and you end up with a mess in the fridge.  For me, using the large Tupperware container makes it easy to mix larger batches by rolling it around and shaking it (Just make sure to hold the top on.).  This was about 8 pounds of meat that was originally frozen in two - one gallon Ziplock bags.

 

The larger container with a lid also makes it easy to get the meat out when you are putting it in the dehydrator.  Get out what you need, put the lid back on and back in the fridge.

I allways lay the ziplocks in a plastic  container just in case but ive never had an issue with the freezer bags. I usually only do 1 roast or cut of meat at a time. I can eat 8 pounds of jerky in a couple hours lol. great post, very detailed and I really like some of your ingredients. ive got to try me some of that toxic wast some time.

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We will also lay the Ziplocks on trays or in containers when we first freeze it.

 

It ends up about 4-5 pounds after drying.  This batch is pretty hot, so it might take you a day or so...

 

There might be some jerky left on Sunday.  lol

 

A little of the toxic waste goes a long way. Just opening the jar had me coughing and my eyes burning yesterday.  lol

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We will also lay the Ziplocks on trays or in containers when we first freeze it.

 

It ends up about 4-5 pounds after drying.  This batch is pretty hot, so it might take you a day or so...

 

There might be some jerky left on Sunday.  lol

 

A little of the toxic waste goes a long way. Just opening the jar had me coughing and my eyes burning yesterday.  lol

lol, I cant wait to try it. I do like my jerky extra extra dry. almost brittle. I have an American harvest dryer two (not as fancy as yours) but ive got 10 trays I think. I usually dry mine overnight. about 10-12 hours for anything realativly thick but I use a deli style meat slicer to make it really thin. it works best if the meats still semi frozen, not thawed but not frozen if you know what I mean.

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One thing about cutting thin slices or just even slices is to let the meat get really stiff but not frozen in the freezer before cutting.

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One thing about cutting thin slices or just even slices is to let the meat get really stiff but not frozen in the freezer before cutting.

As I described, we will freeze the meat when we butcher the deer, separating the bigger roasts from the rest of the "grind meat".  When we are ready to process it, we will take the grind meat, let it thaw enough to cut, then cut it into pieces small enough to fit in the grinder.

 

The roasts, we will work the same way, thawing them enough to slice, which lets you make really thin slices.  You do have to stop once in a while to thaw your fingers.

 

For me, it is easier to freeze the meat first, then thaw it rather than freeze it enough to slice. 

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I do this with boneless chicken breasts all the time.  From total frozen, put on counter for 40 minutes.  PERFECT for dicing, slicing and cutting.  (Time can vary from 35 to 55 minutes depending on temperature and meat thickness).  I've never tried reversing it though, I'm a bit ADHD and would forget it and it would be completely frozen again LOL.

 

 

 

 

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A friend of mine has a butchers band saw and zip zip zip your through especially with steaks. However my dad and some others dont like the saw bone dust mixed in with the meat. I just brush it off but my dad always cut all the meat off the bones with a knife.

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I do this with boneless chicken breasts all the time.  From total frozen, put on counter for 40 minutes.  PERFECT for dicing, slicing and cutting.  (Time can vary from 35 to 55 minutes depending on temperature and meat thickness).  I've never tried reversing it though, I'm a bit ADHD and would forget it and it would be completely frozen again LOL.

Well  doc here's my ADHD kicking in a bit can you make jerky out if chicken I don't see y not

 

Sent from my PG86100 using Tapatalk 2

 

 

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I don't know, I'd guess you could if you smoked it and it reached the proper temps.  I was talking about chopping the chicken for use in stir fry or soups etc.  LOL

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I have never seen nor made chicken jerky.  I have found turkey jerky.

 

I have read a couple of places that you should not use pork to make jerky.

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I helped the guy whose land we were hunting on butcher up 3 deer before I left yesterday and he gave me 4 small roasts.  I might have to cut one of them up to make a little jerky, that looks really good!

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Man that looks good!! My wife and I got a giftcard that will pretty much cover that bad boy. Can't wait to order it! I know one of the first things on the menu  moose0024.gif

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