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oldfatguy

Nuggets of Survival

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Here is a place to put all of those "nuggets of survival" you happen across in your reading, experience, travels or where ever else.

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At the end of January, my buddy and I were in a jeep roll over on PH401 in Ontario Canada. We climbed out unhurt. However, it's 11:30 at night, it's dark, it's near 0 degrees F and we have no phone service (roaming) and we're pretty far from anywhere. No night vision.

 

I'm dressed for the weather, my amigo is not. I have EDC gear in my pockets which somehow managed to stay put. My daypack is in the truck somewhere. It was under my feet, I had put it on the back seat and now it's somewhere on the roof. When we stopped moving. I had enough presence of mind not to release the seat belt catch or I would have fallen on my head. I wiggled around until I got my feet planted on the roof, and could stand up. I had a moment of panic when I realized my door was blocked with snow. It didn't occur to my until the next day, that it's a canvas top with canvas windows and I could have cut through it with my multi-tool.

 

Lessons learned:

 

Survival situations don't just happen out in the woods, the thing that happens is never what thing you've planned for.

 

Dress for the weather, we could have been out there for some time.

 

Strap your survival pack to something solid so that you don't have to feel around blindly in the beef jerky and broken glass for it.

 

EDC gear. We cracked the engine block and the battery was still live. If we had had a fire, we had been down to what was in our pockets.   

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Great info, Muddy. Thanks for sharing this experience.

 

I keep my BOB hooked over the back my the driver's seat so I should be able to find it if I were to have a wreck.

 

I also keep a bag with jumper cables, blanket, gloves, etc in the truck.

 

I have also started to make sure my phone is in an easily accessible pocket when I drive, along with a knife in case I need to cut a seatbelt.

 

In the winter, my hunting overalls, a pair of hunting boots, extra gloves, hat and coat are in the truck as well as a snow shovel in the back ( under the tarp).

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Something else that I wanted to add. We were disoriented. Upside down, confused, stunned and basically moving by sense of touch. It's easy to armchair stratagize what you would do in these situations but when it when it's happening, The brain wants to close the teller window and go to lunch. There needs to be a plan.   

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Exactly Muddy!  That's why it's always good to run scenarios in your head, it helps to prepare the mind as well.

 

 

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If you are stuck in your car in sub-zero conditions, if at all possbile, stay in your car.  I have a thermometer in my truck that shows inside and outside temperature. If there is any sunshine at all, the internal temperature can get up to 30-40 degrees, even when the outside temperature is well below zero.  You also have shelter from the wind and have a larger target for those looking for you to find.

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You can never have too much preparation & planning! Great info you guys!

 

Today I came home to no water. Turns out a water main broke quite a ways away and they shut off the whole area. They have no idea when it will be back on... :curse:

 

Fortunately, I have a nice stockpile of bottled water.

 

School is letting out and lots of kids are coming home to no water. I'm wondering how well that's gonna go over lol. Plus, I don't know if I've mentioned this, but I live in the ghetto. So, when things go bad around here, my area is one of the first to get messy really quick.

 

We are living in my grandparents house while it is up for sale so that it doesn't fall apart from lack of use, and to keep the thugs from stealing all the copper lines and wire (copper theft is HUGE around here). It was a really nice area when they bought the house back in the 50's. It has since gone WAY down the crapper.

 

Situation we recently had:

 

Our house has a "FOR SALE By Owner" sign in the front yard with my cellphone number on it. We have a gated back yard. My wife was home alone (her car in the garage so it looked like no one was home since I park outside), working on a baby quilt for her cousin. It was a nice day, so she had the curtains open on the sliding door. She looks up from sewing and there is a man standing in our back yard looking around suspiciously. Fortunately, he had is back to her. She instantly grabbed her phone and made her way to our room where there is a loaded gun. She called me (I was on the other side of town working with my dad). I instantly relayed to him what was going on and he called my uncle that lives near us. My uncle jumped in his truck and came over. By the time he got here the guy was gone, but our gate was open. The guy had pulled so far into our drive way that my wife couldn't see what kind of car was out there. he may have just been looking at the property (still a BIG no-no, you don't open someone's gate and go into their property), or he was scoping things out (which is very likely and convenient with the sign in the yard)

 

So, on my way home I grabbed a length of logging chain, a "No Trespassing" sign, and a lock. Next time I told her call the cops right away if someone is back there.

 

 

Another situation we had about a month ago:

 

Around 2am I am awoken by sirens and lights flashing through my blinds in my room. I quickly grabbed my pistol, flashlight, and cellphone (all of which are in/on my nightstand). I start looking out the windows and there are cops EVERYWHERE. They were going through people's yards, driving on every street I could see, and looking through/around everything outside everyone's houses. I stayed up and kept watch until well after they left. There's always that chance the perp could try to hide IN a house, regardless of someone being there. It wasn't going to happen to us if I could help it.

 

 

Things learned:

 

Having extra water on hand is ALWAYS a good idea.

 

I taught my wife well to react if something happens. She instantly called me and got to a safe place.

 

I need a light on my Glock in order to free up my other hand.

 

 

 

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Something else that I wanted to add. We were disoriented. Upside down, confused, stunned and basically moving by sense of touch. It's easy to armchair stratagize what you would do in these situations but when it when it's happening, The brain wants to close the teller window and go to lunch. There needs to be a plan.   

 

~ I've been involved in a roll over too before, Muddy. You are exactly right. Your adrenaline is pumping like crazy and it almost makes it impossible to think in detail. you do panic a little when you realise that one of your ways out is blocked by the ground. Getting the seatbelt off without falling IS a big deal. What you said about strapping your gear in is Right on. I was hit broad-side by a big SUV, everything with any weight to it, that wasn't strapped in was catapulted right through the glass on the passenger side windows twenty yards outside of my car. Let's pause a moment, and Thank technology for collision safety engineering.  :thumbup:

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~ I also realized that if I had been hit from the other side, EVERYTHING not strapped down, would've hit ME with enough force to shatter a car window. Loose stuff in a car goes ballistic in a collsion. Including people. Make sure everyone has their seatbelt on. If they refuse, they don't ride. Sorry to go off on a car wreck thing, but it IS the number one killer of young folks.

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Wear your seat belt.  Saved my life, without a doubt.  I rolled 3 times after topping a hill too fast on gravel.  It was wet and mushy and pulled me, I overcorrected, and the rest is history.  I was completely disorientated when I got out of the truck.  Another thing, it may be a good idea to tie down tool boxes...  I had taken mine out a day before, if I hadn't, who knows what would have happened....

 

Gr8, good posts.  I've got a mossberg 590 under my bed because I'm not 21 yet.  Had a couple nights I wondered if I was going to have to get it out with all the drunken parties around here.  Lots of druggies that will rob you for 100 bucks too...

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  I've got a mossberg 590 under my bed because I'm not 21 yet.  Had a couple nights I wondered if I was going to have to get it out with all the drunken parties around here.  Lots of druggies that will rob you for 100 bucks too...

 

 

The'll kill you for a lot less than that.  Drugs screw people up so bad they have killed for pocket change.  That's why it's always pertinent to be prepared to defend yourself regardless of how safe you feel.  Good to be prepared.

 

 

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My credit card company detected a fraudulent charge while while I was in Ontario. No email or phone call to notify that they had canceled my card. So, 200 miles from the hotel, I have no means to pay for dinner, or gas to get home. I have $200 American cash in my pocket. Always carry cash.   

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My credit card company detected a fraudulent charge while while I was in Ontario. No email or phone call to notify that they had canceled my card. So, 200 miles from the hotel, I have no means to pay for dinner, or gas to get home. I have $200 American cash in my pocket. Always carry cash.   

 

Yikes! Yes, I always carry cash as a backup. You never know when you will NEED it.

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