Jump to content
WildSurvive Forum
Swede

The Danger of the Breakdown of Social Order

Recommended Posts

There is some merit to on the move Razor. Wolves survive on foot by moving till they find something to eat along with many wild animals. Then there are the den animals who pack in food for the winter like Chipmunks. Its going to be every man for himself that goes with out saying until you find a group that needs your skills. Of course you will have to be physically able to survive like that. Survivorman was able to make seven days but when he went to ten days it got pretty tough.

 

What part of the country would be better for long term survival?

i dont know why you and doc think  that i belive a sole survivor is better off than a group. i never once said that. but docs scenarios are a bit unrealistic at best.

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I never said you were a sole survive, I said the scenario of a sole survivor is less likely to thrive than a group effort in the long run.  Way different.

 

 

 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

exactly how far up your own ass is your head??? you repeatadly cut down anything that even relates to anyone not following your own ideal of how they intend to survive the fictional scenario you so knowledgeably are prepared for. you have repeatably stuck your own foot in your own mouth (hows that tast by the way) bactracking your own statements when someone a bit more intelligent argues with you.  i cant help but laugh at your bs.  its almost comedic.  and yes, i know someone that has all there survival info on a memory stick and pretends to know there s&^% only for there own ego. thats why they dont have a clue how to even set up a tarp properly yet there uber super survival guy. pooolesseee knock of the bulls&^% and get back to posting actual information people might want to learn.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I backed up my opinion as to why with reasonable assertions.  I also accepted input that was outside of my own scope.  Sorry that seems to bother you so much.  If you feel your opinion warrants further review, by all means extrapolate.  ;)     

 

 

 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I'm off the computer for most of the evening.  I'll check back later or tomorrow. 

 

 

Another question before I take off.  Dealing with bugging in vs bugging out.

 

 

What is the most determining factor in deciding when to bug out or to stay put.  This will vary by person.  Mine is the danger level from outsiders.  Which is why I like the group scenario, larger numbers are harder to attack.    As long as I'm not in danger or completely out of resources, I'm staying put.

 

 

What say you.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I backed up my opinion as to why with reasonable assertions.  I also accepted input that was outside of my own scope.  Sorry that seems to bother you so much.  If you feel your opinion warrants further review, by all means extrapolate.  ;)     

 

 

 

 

i did  ;)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

"You obviously have a set scenario in mind that you are planning for and are itching to "debate" anyone that bites to prove is the only right way to do things."

 

...did I call that one or what?  lol

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I live at sea level. I bugged out during Hurricane Irene. NJ governor C. said get out!! In the event of a full on hurricane, bugging out is a preferable to getting killed. However there isn't too many places to go that won't be effected in unless there was a decent warning time. I lost power for two weeks during the 94 ice storm.

 

The most important thing was that we were stocked up on supplies. Its not hard. There is a hurricane coming. Go shopping NOW! not when the hurricane is making landfall. People who didn't stock up scrambled for groceries where were no longer on the shelves. They are dangerous. If not confrontational, they are driving like idiots, running around like idiots. During Irene there were lines at the gas stations, lines at the ATM, the local hardware store jacked it prices. There was tension.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I live at sea level. I bugged out during Hurricane Irene. NJ governor C. said get out!! In the event of a full on hurricane, bugging out is a preferable to getting killed. However there isn't too many places to go that won't be effected in unless there was a decent warning time. I lost power for two weeks during the 94 ice storm.

 

The most important thing was that we were stocked up on supplies. Its not hard. There is a hurricane coming. Go shopping NOW! not when the hurricane is making landfall. People who didn't stock up scrambled for groceries where were no longer on the shelves. They are dangerous. If not confrontational, they are driving like idiots, running around like idiots. During Irene there were lines at the gas stations, lines at the ATM, the local hardware store jacked it prices. There was tension.

thats the first intelligent thing ive read on the subject. thank you muddy.  :arigato:

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I live at sea level. I bugged out during Hurricane Irene. NJ governor C. said get out!! In the event of a full on hurricane, bugging out is a preferable to getting killed. However there isn't too many places to go that won't be effected in unless there was a decent warning time. I lost power for two weeks during the 94 ice storm.

 

The most important thing was that we were stocked up on supplies. Its not hard. There is a hurricane coming. Go shopping NOW! not when the hurricane is making landfall. People who didn't stock up scrambled for groceries where were no longer on the shelves. They are dangerous. If not confrontational, they are driving like idiots, running around like idiots. During Irene there were lines at the gas stations, lines at the ATM, the local hardware store jacked it prices. There was tension.

Sounds like all kinds of fun, Muddy.  I am glad that I missed that one, but we are all live under the possibility that something like that could happen.

 

We went without power for 8 days in 2008 from an ice storm.  Something like that adjusts your perspective quickly.  Makes it pretty obvious that the ole "bury your head in the sand" approach is not viable.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

After 911 I worked out all sorts of scenarios and escape routes. Since then, two major hurricanes and a slew of blizzards have come and gone. No zombies, no Red Dawn, no bird flu.

 

I'm not discounting an unforeseen emergency or disaster,  I plan for the things I know are going to happen. In any situation, I'm still going to need food, water and flashlight batteries.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

That makes sense, Muddy. Cover the basics and go from there.

 

I do pretty much the same thing, for example, what would I do if a major tornado hit the area, while at home, while at work, while at my parents, etc.  Same idea for snow storms, etc.  From there, you need to be able to adapt and apply the same basic skills and knowledge to the situation at hand.  Even so, every situation will be dynamic, constantly changing, so rather than blindly following a premade plan, you need to be able to adapt to the changes that get thrown at you.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

After 911 I worked out all sorts of scenarios and escape routes. Since then, two major hurricanes and a slew of blizzards have come and gone. No zombies, no Red Dawn, no bird flu.

 

I'm not discounting an unforeseen emergency or disaster,  I plan for the things I know are going to happen. In any situation, I'm still going to need food, water and flashlight batteries.

and thats what everyone should be doin, you can pretend to prep for long term but in reality its more important and logical to prep for the immediate future. i always have 30 days of food and water and other basics. but i have bags of  levil 1 (quick grab and carry immediate needs) and levil 2 large duffle of comfort items i can drop if speed is essential.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

That makes sense, Muddy. I do pretty much the same thing, for example, what would I do if a major tornado hit the area, while at home, while at work, while at my parents, etc.  Same idea for snow storms, etc.  From there, you need to be able to adapt and apply the same basic skills and knowledge to the situation at hand.  Even so, every situation will be dynamic, constantly changing, so rather than blinding following a plan, you need to be able to adapt to the changes that get thrown at you.

i do the same. after experience as a fireman and dealing with tornadoes, flooding and of course fires i see how important immediate needs are. way more important than what might be needed 3 months down the road. being able to adapt and not stick to a simple pre conceived plan is paramount.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

and thats what everyone should be doin, you can pretend to prep for long term but in reality its more important and logical to prep for the immediate future. i always have 30 days of food and water and other basics. but i have bags of  levil 1 (quick grab and carry immediate needs) and levil 2 large duffle of comfort items i can drop if speed is essential.

Same concept they covered in the Remote and Wilderness First Aid Class.  When asked which you should treat first - breathing and circulation or blood loss, the answer is breathing and circulation. Without those, the person will be dead from that before they can bleed out. 

 

If you don't survive past the short term, it does not matter whether or not you have a long term survival plan.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

That makes sense, Muddy. Cover the basics and go from there.

 

I do pretty much the same thing, for example, what would I do if a major tornado hit the area, while at home, while at work, while at my parents, etc.  Same idea for snow storms, etc.  From there, you need to be able to adapt and apply the same basic skills and knowledge to the situation at hand.  Even so, every situation will be dynamic, constantly changing, so rather than blindly following a premade plan, you need to be able to adapt to the changes that get thrown at you.

 

Ive learned that the thing that goes wrong will seldom be the thing I planned for. Good points about emergencies happening while away from home.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Ive learned that the thing that goes wrong will seldom be the thing I planned for. Good points about emergencies happening while away from home.

Yeah, my wife looks at me funny anytime we go someplace and I grab my pack and throw it in the van.  I would rather put up with that an never have to use it that need it and be without it.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Doc. Perhaps if you didnt refer to anyones own input on the subject that dosnt fit your own ideals as "Mad max" ish then you wouldnt come off so oobnoxious and offensive.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

As prepers or survivalists, we all plan for the the short term.  That's part of being prepared and just common sense.    But once you are prepared for the short term, do you stop there or do you prepare for longer term?  Do you monitor current events and study current and past events to get an idea of what may come?

 

 

Does it hurt to look further ahead?  Does it hurt to study history and mentally prepare yourself for what may come?  Does it hurt to discuss the potential?  Do discussions about pandemic diseases or economic collapse create problems for anyone. (Other than those with anger issues anyway).  I still feel a pandemic or economic depression/collapse are the two biggest long term threats we face.  I'm not worried about the short term because I'm very well prepared for the short term.  I'd hope everyone who spends any time on preparedness or survivalist forums has planned for the short term, otherwise my faith in the preparedness community would be shaken.

 

 

Muddy, I'm right there with you on the bug out vs bug in.  If the threat potential is high enough, I'm bugging out, weather it's from something like flooding, or fire, or a chemical spill or from starving people.  If it's not high enough, I plan to stay put.

 

 

 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Mad Max isn't the style of prepping, mad max is the description of a total end of the world type scenario where populations have been decimated to such a level that nobody is going to group back together and return to a more normalized social system.  It's not a reference to an individual. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Another plan I adhere to for emergency situations is I never bring my vehicles home without a full tank of gas. My last stop on the way home is a gas station. That insures me that if I have to I can be many miles away.

 

Its not a bad discussion when people disagree. Thats why its called debate. Good input thank you.  :arigato:

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

 

Thats a great idea Swede.  Does anyone store gasoline outside of their vehicles?  I know some people who have a couple hundred gallons that they rotate out, but I don't have room for that. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The alcohol in gas these days doesnt lend well to a large amount of storage especially two cycle because the alcohol evaporates but its better then nothing. Generator gas is always a good thing to keep a supply for. Ill look up gas storage.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now

×