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Top Five Survival Items

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If you could pick five items to take with you for an extended stay in the wilderness what would they be?

 

1-  I chose my Marlin .22 cal survival rifle. I can carry lots of ammunition without much trouble. Stainless and

composite stalk make it tough and dependable. Water resistant floating carrying case. Shoots seven or ten shots depending on witch clip you chose as fast as you can pull the trigger

 

2-Mag stick I like bic lighters better but not as reliable or useful as a mag stick in the long run.

 

3- Stainless pot. I can use it to sterilize water and store it and use it for cooking. Im a fan of boiling food because it retains fat and oils that are lost on open fires.

 

4- A roll of large trash bags. Good for rain gear, clothing and water proofing a shelter. You can make a catch basin for rain water, solar collector and storage to keep tinder dry.Put one on the ground to keep ground moisture off at night.

 

5-  Machete. An axe may be better but heavy to carry however a machete can cut nearly as well. They make heavier blades on different models and usually carbon steel. Carbon is much easier to sharpen then stainless steel and a sand stone rock will work to resharpen. It can replace a hunting knife and be more useful as a killing tool if need be. 

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I'd be torn between the axe/knife combo or a machete normally.    I love machete's but I like a smaller more manageable knife for most tasks.

 

 

Most everything else I'd go right along with most of what you listed.  Except it would be stuff drawn from my own inventory right now.

 

 

1.  My Ruger 10/22.  Reliable and accurate.  Can carry tons of ammo for it for an extended stay in the woods

2.  Cutting device, I don't have a machete so I'd take my Tops Hog and make do.  I won't be building a log cabin, but it will build me a strong shelter just fine.

3.  A roll of Contractor bags.  (Mine are the heavy duty 55 gallon Drum style about 5 times thicker than regular trash-bags).   

4.  My Firesteel, I have a dozen different fire starters, but that has been the most consistent.

5.  A pot would next.  Sure, I could hollow out logs and use fire to make coals and burn bowls out of wood (My oldest boy did that last weekend, pretty cool).  But a pot would just be so much easier. 

 

 

 

 

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1 - Remington Nylon 66, .22. A great, light, reliable, accurate rifle.  Holds 16 rounds.

2 - a knife - Mora, Cold Steel, Buck, whatever, just a good quality knife

3 - ferro rod - I have practiced with one for years and for me this is the most reliable, log term way to make a fire

4 - stainless steel pot

5 - hatchet or a tarp, still deciding on that one.

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1.  Quality knife  (these type of lists should already have that as number one.  lol

 

2. lightweight 10 x 10 nylon tarp, i can build a fairly water resistant shelter but it takes time. with a tarp i can          burrito up in seconds for a quick storm and having a dry shelter can make the difference in not only comfort but safety. (and you can use it to collect rainwater and dew so you dont have to use energy to boil.

 

3. my ruger 1022.  same as above, carry lots of ammo and accurate.

 

4. steel pot  cook, decontaminate water, wash in hobo style, collect food, berries water etc.

 

5. salt and pepper  if you've ever only eaten the things you pick, shoot and fish for 2 or more  days in a row you will understand the value of these two items immensely.    :hugegrin:

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You know, with very little exception the first 3 or 4 tools/piece of gear are pretty well established.  What about the second 5 items?  Lets say for the sake of argument, Everyone already has the first 5 items on their list, What are the next 5 items? 

 

 

1.  Cordage, sure it can be made in the field, but a 100 foot hank of paracord and or a 100 ft of kernmantle would go a long way.

2.  I'd add a full sized ax (Or maybe a mid sized camp style ax rather than a hatched or hawk).  Just more efficient.

3.  Collapsible water container (3 or 4 gallon), this is just a convenience thing.

4.  Folding camp shovel or E-Tool for moving dirt faster  (I'm also torn between this and a mattock style tool for digging)

5.  Another convenience item.  A long life LED flashlight.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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You know, with very little exception the first 3 or 4 tools/piece of gear are pretty well established.  What about the second 5 items?  Lets say for the sake of argument, Everyone already has the first 5 items on their list, What are the next 5 items? 

 

 

1.  Cordage, sure it can be made in the field, but a 100 foot hank of paracord and or a 100 ft of kernmantle would go a long way.

2.  I'd add a full sized ax (Or maybe a mid sized camp style ax rather than a hatched or hawk).  Just more efficient.

3.  Collapsible water container (3 or 4 gallon), this is just a convenience thing.

4.  Folding camp shovel or E-Tool for moving dirt faster  (I'm also torn between this and a mattock style tool for digging)

5.  Another convenience item.  A long life LED flashlight.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

well you could start your own thread instead of hijacking this one...just sayin  :whistle:

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You know, with very little exception the first 3 or 4 tools/piece of gear are pretty well established.  What about the second 5 items?  Lets say for the sake of argument, Everyone already has the first 5 items on their list, What are the next 5 items? 

 

 

1.  Cordage, sure it can be made in the field, but a 100 foot hank of paracord and or a 100 ft of kernmantle would go a long way.

2.  I'd add a full sized ax (Or maybe a mid sized camp style ax rather than a hatched or hawk).  Just more efficient.

3.  Collapsible water container (3 or 4 gallon), this is just a convenience thing.

4.  Folding camp shovel or E-Tool for moving dirt faster  (I'm also torn between this and a mattock style tool for digging)

5.  Another convenience item.  A long life LED flashlight.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

diaper, ky, some mustard powder, a bag of redman chew and one of those little drink umbrellas.

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diaper, ky, some mustard powder, a bag of redman chew and one of those little drink umbrellas.

Now Im laughing!  :woot:

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A roll of Contractor bags? Sounds good but how heavy are they?

i always keep a few bags in my kit but they really dont replace a decent tarp. they get holes way to easy and tear to much trying to set up any kind of tarp system. a few for quick remidees work but ill always take a good tarp over them. just my two cents.

 

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well les stround msk it has a flint striker on cordage signal mirror

my stanly cup with the cups inside

my survival tent

first aid kit and whisle

those are great items Kim. cant go wrong with those.

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A roll weights about 1.5 to 2 lbs I think for my half rolls.  I split the rolls, keep 1/2 roll at home and the other half in my primary bag.  There are 18 on the roll.  I keep 3 in the top of each of my packs/bags.  They are far more durable than even heavy gauge plastic rolls and in my opinion far more useful.  If you Fill one with air, you can tie it off into 3 sections and it makes one heck of a good flotation device.  (Tying it off in 3 sections also helps ensure if one section does get a hole, the others still work), something I wouldn't want to trust weaker bags to do.  The seems are even tougher than the bags walls.  Iv'e never blown a seem out.

 

 

I've tried lots of different bags and I even used to keep rolls of heavy gauge plastic sheets, but once I switched to the contractor bags, I never went back.

 

 

Plus A whole roll takes the same space as a single 10 x 12 medium or light duty polytarp and not really much heavier.  they are more sanitary than a single tarp which would have to be reused for various purposes.  These are FAR tougher than any trash bags you may be used to using. If you've never tried em, I'd recommend grabbing a roll to play with.

 

 

I get them at walmart, pretty cheap.  http://www.walmart.com/ip/12167205?wmlspartner=wlpa&adid=22222222227009919583&wl0=&wl1=g&wl2=c&wl3=40343285072&wl4=&wl5=pla&wl6=78303340352&veh=sem

 

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Hey Swede, Another item of note that Kim's post made me think about.

 

 

This is really 2 scenarios and someone might use different kit for each.  Scenario one is as you described, just going out to live in the woods for an extended period of time.

 

 

Scenario 2 is going out and surviving until rescued, you might take something like Kim mentioned the signal mirror to aid in your rescue.  Just some food for thought.  Not sure if I'd change my kit, but you never know.

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i would still choose a quality nylon tarp over any walmart poly tarp. stronger, longer lasting. and breathable.  the uses of wich are endless. i always keep a few "contractor" bags in my kits for there obvious uses but would never count on them for real shelter. good quick fix if necessary but way better alternatives for the same weight penalty.

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But can you use your tarp to collect water and as shelter at the same time?  I like a good tarp, don't get me wrong, but in this scenario, I feel the bags are just more useful and more flexible.  But with the extended 5 items, I might add a good tarp.  The cool thing about the contractor bags are, they are large enough to use as rain gear while I build a shelter.  So I can stay dry while I'm building rather than build wet and then try to get dry.  Plus I can put all my gear inside of one and it will stay perfectly dry while I build shelter.  Just good and flexible.  No they won't last as long as a nylon tarp or a poly tarp, but they only have to last long enough for me to build a decent shelter.  Then I can use them for other things like collecting and storing water. 

 

 

 

 

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But can you use your tarp to collect water and as shelter at the same time?  I like a good tarp, don't get me wrong, but in this scenario, I feel the bags are just more useful and more flexible.  But with the extended 5 items, I might add a good tarp.  The cool thing about the contractor bags are, they are large enough to use as rain gear while I build a shelter.  So I can stay dry while I'm building rather than build wet and then try to get dry.  Plus I can put all my gear inside of one and it will stay perfectly dry while I build shelter.  Just good and flexible.  No they won't last as long as a nylon tarp or a poly tarp, but they only have to last long enough for me to build a decent shelter.  Then I can use them for other things like collecting and storing water. 

 

 

 

 

and obviously you have never actually set up a shelter in the rain. (i always have rain gear on me like any real outdoorsman or even slightly prepared person would.  ive seen a dozen scouts a dozen times use bags for sshelter from the rain (usually the ones ive given them) and every time they get as wet if not wetter than the ones that actually used real rain gear. sounds great in a book, sounds even better on a youtube channel but nothing beats real world experience. next time you get a rain storm go out in it and practice what you want to  teach. you will learn what really works and what dosnt. garbage are great for a storm on a scout overnight especially to put there shoes in outside the tent. just dont expect any real shelter from them in the real world. they will help, but not as much as you think.

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So you have both a tarp and rain gear as your 5 items in the list above.  This was limited to 5 items.  I always have rain gear in my kit as well, but in this scenario, it was assumed it was not available. 

 

 

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So you have both a tarp and rain gear as your 5 items in the list above.  This was limited to 5 items.  I always have rain gear in my kit as well, but in this scenario, it was assumed it was not available. 

 

 

rain gear is assumed since anyone with half a brain would have it. anyways a tarp would definitely replace garbage bags in my kit since i can wrap up in it as i do whatever tasks need done, and would still be a viable shelter source that is easy to set up and well... pretty windproof after you actually set it up, not like garbage bags wich unless you have actually tried to create a shelter with wouldn't survive . try it sometime, make sure you get pictures and hopefully video. i would love to be proved wrong  :thumbup:

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So we don't need to keep fire starting materials on the list as well since we all carry those with us EDC as well? 

 

 

 

Along with the rain gear, I have a pot, 100 feet of paracord in my kit when I'm out in the field along with both a folding and a fixed blade.  So those items don't count in this scenario either?  happy097.gif

 

 

Heavy gauge plastic works well for both temporary shelter, and as a water proofing under sod and other materials to keep your shelter perfectly dry.  I know that works because I've done it.  The plastic only has to last until the cover material is put on it.     

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So we don't need to keep fire starting materials on the list as well since we all carry those with us EDC as well? 

 

 

 

Along with the rain gear, I have a pot, 100 feet of paracord in my kit when I'm out in the field along with both a folding and a fixed blade.  So those items don't count in this scenario either?  happy097.gif

 

 

Heavy gauge plastic works well for both temporary shelter, and as a water proofing under sod and other materials to keep your shelter perfectly dry.  I know that works because I've done it.  The plastic only has to last until the cover material is put on it.     

and as usual you didnt even read the original post. "long term" jeash... just cant open your eyes, you know way to much for us regular normal mortal survialist wannabees.  doh.gif

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Yes, long term means a more permanent shelter.  I'd use 2 bags (Which split into 5 x 8 tarps) as cover and sod it over.  I'd have a perfectly comfortable well insulated shelter.  Then I'd still have 7 more bags to use for all the other useful tasks like collecting rain water, storing food, keeping my gear dry, rain gear, etc,etc etc.  :thumbsup:

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I don't have infinite wisdom.  I simply explained what I would use and how based on the scenario Swede devised.  You keep your 1 tarp, I'll keep my contractor bags and we'll both be happy.  Jeesh, it's not tough.

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