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Natural cordage tutorial (picture heavy)

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I just made some cordage last week for a pauite deadfall.  I think it was a plant called New York Ironweed.....not 100% sure.  It worked REALLY well.  I smashed it with a rock to seperate it......then reverse wrapped it like BB talks about. 

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Guest adrenjunky

Machine where are the pics? Can I please see the pics? sad042.gif

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Yeah, Machine, I'd like to see it, too. :)

 

BB, i'm sorry, but i just need a little more help. :unsure:  (Recall, i dont havethe fibers just yet.)

 

1. I'm supposed to twist the left side in a counter-clockwie direction. OK. But, then, to twist the left end clockwise i have to go under. Am i just supposed to got under and around??

 

Thanks.

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Dan - I think that rather than keep trying to use words to explain this I'm going to add to my tutorial showing the left-handed method. This'll take me a day or so, so be patient.

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Ok...not to take anything away from BB tutorial, but this is me...putting into practice what he is teaching.  Although....his always comes out better.  Mine was usable that is all I needed.  But I used the same technique.  The reverse wrap. 

 

Here is the plant I used.  I think it is called a New York ironweed.  (not sure though)

 

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This is how I processed it.  Using a couple rocks and breaking it up.

 

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This is the fibers after I was done.  I had to peel away some harder woody pieces with my fingers. 

 

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Then I reverse wrapped it (no pics...sorry).  Here is the finished cordage.

 

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I used it to demo a paiute deadfall. (note this is NOT the proper way to set up this trap, it was only for demo purposes to show the cordage would have worked).

 

1001186jh6.jpg

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actually i have a question for everyone.

 

I made cordage the same exact way machine did. but with thistle,

I have made thistle the way you are "suposed" to, the way they say to in all the articles, and the same method that bigblue used in his article (which is very good by the way).

but this way that i have made it recently with thistle, I just took the green thistle, not dead, not dried not specially treated, and just flattened it out and smashed out the fibers with a small log. I used the reverse wrap and everything. and i got a VERY strong rope, I didnt seperate the outer fibers with the rest of the plant, the way you would in traditional methods but kept the plant whole and just smashed it all and seperated ALL its fibers. and just made cordage out of it like normal with the reverse wrap.

I like how it turned out. and i still have the peice of rope i made, it is still extremely strong, but its thick of ocurse, since i used the whole plant.

im just wondering, is this any better, am i doing this the right way? or is there a better way to do it for a green fresh plant of thistle?

 

machine, it looks like we think alike :)

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most of the lists out there are very very incomplete. and alot of times people rant and rave about a few special plants and everyone starts to think those are the only cordage plants, but there are alot out there, some of my favorite arnt even from plants but the inner bark of trees such as the poplar tree. or willow. but of course, some are always better than others.

 

thistle, milkweed, dogbane, sedge, poplar inner bark, running ground pine, spruce roots, agave, basswood, nettles, yucca

 

but really thats just a few. something i learned from bow was when your walking through the woods or wherever, grab plants along the way and pull them, if it tugs you back, or you cant pull it up. you may have some good cordage material there.

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That is along what I would say......I made this cordage and had no idea what the plant was. (I looked it up after) It had characteristics I was looking for....so I tried it. It worked.

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I got SOME KIND of fibers :help:. I have NO idea what and they're not too promising, and I still have to buff them. (If there's anything to BE buffed, its all green, not like BB's that was grey. :()

 

Still wait'n on that tutorial, BB.

Just kidding, take your time :P

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Big Blue's fibers were gray because they were in winter time.....after the frost.  Anything now would be green. 

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Oh, Duh, THanks. I found one stalk that had a grey/white/black color on one side.

 

All the plants that I found had a white inner core? Are these plants O.K?

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Still wait'n on that tutorial, BB.

 

Well, you'll have to wait a bit longer. We just bought a new camera and I'm having trouble uploading photos from the camera onto the computer. I'll get these pictures of low-tech cordage making up as soon as I fgure out how this high-tech camrera works.  :rant:

 

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I DID IT I DID IT I DID IT :hugegrin:

 

Using the fibres that i got, I made a rope :grin: I didn't use BB's way, because the fibers I had were grass texture, not sort of fuzzy like BB's. In stead I used a simple Left-over-Middle Right-over-Middle braiding style, but the point is that it worked :P

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Way ta go!!! :thumbsup: :hug:  That is so awesome!  I've been trying too, but mine looked like mangled horsehair...

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Dave and I got together to train today and one of the things we did was cordage.   This is cordage from a Yucca plant. (no not native to my area, it was planted).  This is one of the strongest materials I have used.  Dave had made some very thin cordage and it was almost too strong to break.  This would be great for primitive fishing or snaring. 

 

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Dave's is the nicer one....(in case you were wondering)

 

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