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Your canoeing in a fairly fast moving river and your canoe tips over putting you in the middle of the river. The water runs from waist deep to over your head. You lose track of your canoe but you have your life vest on. You've got to get to the bank but its a pretty wide river.

 

How do you do that safely?

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When we went white-water rafting in West Virginia, we were told that if we get knocked out of the raft, we should float on our backs with our feet pointing downstream and let the current take us downstream until we came to a calm area and could stand up and walk to shore or swim to shore.  Then the guides kicked us out of the rafts in the middle of rapids!  LOL!  It was a great experience because once you do it, you lose the fear of being tipped into the water.

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That is correct> face down stream with your feet out in front of you to keep from getting injured by hitting rocks or logs under the surface.

Dont fight the current or be in a hurry to reach the shore you can easily exaust yourself. The natural flow of the water will eventually carry you to the bank. Its more important to conserve your energy. You can carefully work your way towards the bank.

 

Good job Holly. :thumbup:

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Awwwww... and I was going to say to flail your arms and scream like a banshee!  Dang. ::)

 

Well, I'll admit it's a lot more fun to do it THAT way!  :D

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If I was to say "face is red raise the head" face is pale raise the tail" What medical condition would I be treating in the field?

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SHOCK> That is correct Dave I knew you would know that. You should look into parametics. This bunch is to tough to stump. ;)

 

Im going to have to get a tougher one.

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The Right Elevation

You thought you had given yourself enough time for the return hike, but suddenly night is overtaking you as you follow your trail back toward camp, which is still a few miles away. The going is slow as you fight your way through dense foliage in the deep canyon. This broken country is nothing but forested canyons separated by bald ridges. Finally, in utter blackness and feeling the onset of a biting chill, you give up and decide to make camp. You have nothing but the clothes you are wearing. How will you make it through the night?

A. Camp in the deepest part of the canyon.

B. Climb to the ridgetop and camp there.

C. Climb two-thirds of the way to the ridgetop, find some cover and spend the night there.

D. Find the densest bunch of trees and hunker down for warmth.

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well dont go to the tops bescuse the wind would be hard up there dont climb up and stop becuse maybe a rock slide plus snakes :) i would chosoe D ?

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I am going to assume some important info with my answer. I will assume that, by describing the terrain as having a "canyon" vs a "valley", I am in the desert which may indicate a rapid and substantial drop in temp as the night progresses. I will assume that we are not talking about canyon walls that are either extremely high, or extradordinarily steep .... both factors that may prohibit climbing out in the event of flash flood. I will further assume that pre-hike weather reports, and continued clear skies showed no chance of rain in the region.... which may lead to flash floods.

 

Of the possible choices, I would choose "D".

 

It is always possible to find small rises on the canyon floor that will raise me up off of the lowest/coldest part of the terrain. The vegitation may indicate the presence of water that I can use to hydrate myself. That same vegitation can also be used to make a suitable shelter above/around me offering protection from wind and dew, and to place under me providing insulation from the ground. Even if the canyon walls are climbable, I wouldn't want to risk the possibility of slipping/injury, or over-exertion - leading to dehydration - leading to possible hypothermia - as a result of the climb.

 

And, with my extrordinary (read: superhuman) level of skill, I might be able to find dead, dry vegitative material to fashion a hand/bow drill, tinder and fuel for fire.

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First - "D" - If it is utterly black night, run no risk.  Stay on trail and continue in the morning.  Pull in as much cover and start a fire.

 

C- Is more typical of a better chioce to avoid top hill winds and low valley cold at night, but in your scenario, you could not make that kind of climb at night.  Making that choice is better for survival and when not knowing where you are.  And only in daylight.

 

 

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You have nothing but the clothes you are wearing.

 

Cant build a fire.

 

One answer only please Lost.

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"This broken country is nothing but forested canyons separated by bald ridges"

 

Forested canyons not straight up and down.

 

"You have nothing but the clothes you are wearing"

 

Im totally unprepared with no multitool so it would indeed take supperhuman effort to make a fire bow.

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Stickin' with "D".

 

Why 2/3 the way up? Why not 1/3, or 1/2, or 15/32 the way up? Why go up at all (?).... I know, I know, get up out of the colder air. But, for ME, in the "utter blackness", I'm going to stay put, find a small rise, and make a shelter.

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OK I missed this one on a survival test so I remembered it. I also chose "D" but they say (who ever that is) that the warmest area is "C"

 

You guys are correct windy on the top cold settles in the bottom. They went on saying try to find an area thick with coniforus (sp) trees to help preserve warmth 2/3 of the way up the hill.

 

Dont blame me thats what "they" say. :unsure:

 

I say it depends a lot on the area but their right on the warmest place ought to be 2/3s up. :uhuh:

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Just to add:

 

I have been exactly here. This is Palm Canyon in the Kofa National Wildlife Refuge outside of Quartzite, AZ. This is what I picture when I read your description.

 

kofacanyonby3.jpg

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No trees there Blue. :nono:

 

Never been to the desert. We went through some in Oaklahoma and eastern Colorado east of Colorado Springs.

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You know your going to be without electrical power for an extended peoiod of time and you need to store drinking water. How much water per person per day should you store?

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