Jump to content
WildSurvive Forum
Sign in to follow this  
bestseller92

Firearms trivia.

Recommended Posts

Ok, here's some of my Western trivia:

 

Where was Chief Crazy Horse killed?

 

Who killed him?

 

What did this person use to kill him?

 

Why is Chimney Rock (Nebraska) allegedly 30 feet shorter than it was over 130 years ago? Not Jim Bridgers account, but as written in a journal by Albert Dickson.

 

What tribe was Sacajawea from?

 

What did the French refer to this tribe as?

 

What did her name mean according to her tribal language?

 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

 

Kentucky Windage is : An estimate of the modified point of aim required to compensate for wind or for target movement. Like aiming a so many inches or so above or in front of a distant or moving target.

 

 

So the term Kentucky Windage is simply using best judgement and estimate for leading a target? Cool, didn't know that.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Good on you rockhounder  :thumbsup:

 

The 45/70 proper name is 45-70-405 or more commonly called 45 Govt.

45cal....70gr black powder..405gr bullet and indeed for the 1873 Springfield "Trap Door Springfield"

 

The earliest of the Boot Hill cemetary I know is Sydney Nebraska? Military cemetary

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Kentucky Windage is having an idea of the trajectory either by seeing the impact point near the target and adjusting to it leadingis  knowing the trajectory of your rd and doping the wind and/or judging the speed of the target allow for enough time/drift so the the target actually runs into the bullet of sort.

Crazy Horse

Fort robinson

Bayoneted by either tribal police or a soldier accompanying them?

Bayonet

Sacajawea

Shoshone woman

Shoshone common name was also Snake Nation but in their language refered themselves as "the people" as most all aboriginal refer to themselves

married to a French Canadian Toussaint Charbonneau

"Boat pusher" though it would not sound out as Sacajawea

 

Edit:

Actually I am related to the Charbonneau family so we may be related in the long past as I have many American relatives that I am only starting to know of.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Yeah, the lead has to a known per say as the lead used by let say a 45/70 with its arc, slow trajectory would be much different than a 270 win quite a bit faster and flatter. just a matter of knowingly gaging your rd mostly by experience of actually calculating it out by balistic tables.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Good on you rockhounder  :thumbsup:

 

The 45/70 proper name is 45-70-405 or more commonly called 45 Govt.

45cal....70gr black powder..405gr bullet and indeed for the 1873 Springfield "Trap Door Springfield"

 

The earliest of the Boot Hill cemetary I know is Sydney Nebraska? Military cemetary

 

Correct on the Boot Hill, Sydney NE. Spent many o' summers on Lake McConaughy.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Kentucky Windage is having an idea of the trajectory either by seeing the impact point near the target and adjusting to it or knowing the trajectory of your rd and doping the wind and/or judging the speed of the target allow for enough time/drift so the the target actually runs into the bullet of sort.

Crazy Horse

Fort robinson

Bayoneted by either tribal police or a soldier accompanying them?

Bayonet

Sacajawea

Shoshone woman

Shoshone common name was also Snake Nation but in their language refered themselves as "the people" as most all aboriginal refer to themselves

married to a French Canadian Toussaint Charbonneau

"Boat pusher" though it would not sound out as Sacajawea

 

Edit:

Actually I am related to the Charbonneau family so we may be related in the long past as I have many American relatives that I am only starting to know of.

 

Very interesting on the family linneage, you should pursue that.

 

Yes, Crazy Horse (Tashunca-Uitco) was killed by a soldier who thought he was resisting arrest. He was bayoneted (trowel bayonet) in the abdomen and later died that evening.

 

Fact: I lived in Crawford Nebraska (2 miles from Fort Robinson)for several years and worked at the fort as a docent as a young kid.

 

You are correctomundo on the rest of em.

 

Any clue on Chimney rock?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I have heard of Chimney Rock but honestly could not give a proper answer without reseaching it, so I will look into it.  ;)

 

Edit

Well looked into real fast and the best I can find is that erosion (wind I presume)

has reduced it to its present levels?

 

 

 

Forgot a word in an earlier post and corrected accordingly as KW and lead are different even though you aim both in relative point other than the actual target.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Bob, Rocky - Please explain to me WHY steel shot is less acurate/affective then lead shot. Is it the weight/mass thing?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Bob, Rocky - Please explain to me WHY steel shot is less acurate/affective then lead shot. Is it the weight/mass thing?

 

Steel has considerably less mass than lead shot, I would imagine velocity loss at a much lesser distance than lead shot. Plus, steel shot will remain perfectly spherical which is a horrible design for true flight path, that's why golf balls have dimples. My $.02

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Steel shot needs to be lead (offset) differently than "lead (metal)" as it will shed velocity faster than "lead" so shorter range if the same shot size is used, and being lighter it actually needs to be about 2 size larger (dia.) to approximate a similar effeciency as "lead" but you reduce pellent quantity by larger dia. volume, most of the guys who waterfowl hunt report more training to compensate in the amo. Bismuth is much closer in density to "lead" but much costlier. Here in Ontario you cannot have "lead" shot closer than 100yds? to a water course in hunting migratory birds (ducks, geese etc..)

I guess that is why the 12ga 3-1/2" mag was introduced to add the same larger pellets for those long shots an those tough geese. Plus the fact steel shot deforms so much less than lead it can skip easier if the angle on a lake is not quite right. Think of the movie footage of the "dam busters" as they skipped those large bombs accross the water. :scared:

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

That's what I thought. But, is it not possible to manufacture steel shot with dimples so they fly in a more accurate trajectory?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I think savage rifles are under rated. They used to be junk guns no one wanted.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Guest adrenjunky

I agree about the steel shoot it sucks! Another trick is to choke up one size.(ie if you use ic jump up to mod)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I don't know if it would be cost effective bismuth might be better at that price?

 

I know very little about firearms, as compared to you guys, but it seems to me that to mass manufacture a die-cast, dimpled (or otherwise more aerodynamic) steel shot would'nt be all that difficult or prohibitively expensive.

I also wonder about the associated costs of: additional powder needed to propell the heavier lead shot, waterfowl die-off due to lead poisoning (an opportunity cost), defending/satisfying public image and market viability against the environmental lobby and existing environmental regulations.

 

Just my brain at work.....  :S

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Steel as an alternative on a few levels:

-Quick fix to a perceived problem: waterfowl are still dieing off: the cause bacterial infection basicaly the same as before so lead was not the major cause.---Bad sciencetific interpretation. I know there will never be a "going back" to lead, as the powers and fringe groups prefer to see the die off than admit their mistakes :nono:

-Lighter weight so you need larger shot size plus as AJ said tighten up choke, also need more volume in shell to hold equivalent load ---More powder, larger capacity shells, equals stronger sustained recoil to the hunter to get it all out there.

-Hard on barrels---no compression other than the walls of the plastic cups. Eliminates the Black Powder shooters unless they reconfigure their shot style to include a plastic cup, estheticaly not pleasing for many of them.

-Long term storage (wet weather situation and storage) can lead to "rust welding" of the load producing unbalanced shot patterns (holes) unless applying some form of rust inhibitor  (want to ingest that with your peas?)

The actual shape of the shot pellet is less important than the lighter weight to spherical surface volume which would cause the pellet to be easyly veered/deflected by wind, much easier than the much heavier and smaller surface spherical surfaced lead pellet. So engineering has to be used to try to equalize the problem. You guys that are schooled can correct me but is it not an accepted fact that a body in motion wants to stay in motion, the heavier and denser, less wind deflected should be better at longer flight with more enregy down the "road".

-Impressing the dimples has to be engineered equally spaced for true flight otherwise time money misspent. This would have to be done for every size of shot, takes time to figure out the best size/pattern/depth of dimples.  Look into golf balls and see how much technology/engineering actualy goes into them. 

-Factually a lot less waterfowl/migratory bird hunters are now present as there was maybe 50 yrs ago, so less of a demand. Clay, skeet shooter not affected as they are not hunting; unless their ranges are close to water.

You can see the results of the hunting let up as one factor (climatic change should also be a consideration) in the larger waterfowl population that are in our cities and leaving fecal matter in parks, beaches and swimming locations, which incidently have bacterial contents that cause disease to peoples, how many public swimming beaches have been closed off due to this problem? aggressive geese denying park access to people etc..

Also as I have mentioned before deflection upon hitting a surface (ricochet) is more of a problem, --safety.

Engineering the dimples should not present a major design/production problem except as an added cost, but as people are using the steel shot irregardless of quality of preformance, I don't see any movement towards any solution as more and more of up and comming waterfowl hunters who have no lead vs steel yardstick to access the situation, accept the present results as a "fait accompli" and PC to boot. Can't go against perceived notions no matter what the truth.

I can only respond to the steel shot situation as the mis-begotten answer to a contrived rumour that vested interest groups made an issue of. Waterfowl are still dieing and where are they now?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I call steel shot the "nuckel ball effect" unless you can get them spinning their trajectory is wild to say the least. It seems to produce what they call "strays"

 

Also Im afraid heavier loads and extra powder will only make them less stable with even more strays. If enviornmentalists (if thats who started this) go to a trap shoot range their going to find a lot more lead in the soil. Im not that sure eniornmentalists started this.It would seem that injested lead shot would be a problem.

 

I dont see any evidence in snow geese that have over populated.

 

I would think the NRA has conducted some pattern tests on the steel shot. Someone check.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The patterns from steel shot were studied pretty closely by gunwriters when it was introduced, but I can't remember much.  The main things about steel shot are that the mass of the pellet not only limits the range of the shot but also its terminal ballistics (less retained energy=crippled birds), and that your shotgun barrel had better be rated for steel.  Several new loads out there that are better than bismuth, including Hevi-Shot (alloy), Remington Non-toxic, Winchester Non-Toxic, etc.  Prices seem to be higher, though.  The solution of the 3 1/2" chamber was the result of the "more powder and payload" school of thought, and a boon to the shooting pad industry!  It was always really fun to sit up in a coffin-blind and fire one of those babies!  Lay ya right back out it seemed!

 

I have to agree about the Savage rifles being a great value.  Gun Tests magazine consistently rate them highly (Gun Tests accepts no advertising, so they can feel free to tell you if it's junk).  Remington's model 710 economy rifles have had one major recall already, and aren't nearly as nice as the model 700 line.  If an economy rifle is what you want, go with a Savage.  Remingtons and Winchesters have always been favorites, but the new Rugers are really magnificent rifles if you want something more. 

 

I agree on the scopes.  Weaver or Redfield are excellent.  If you find you want a more costly scope, then go with Leupold.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

In reply to Swede's questions (I'll comment on the ones I know something about only):

 

2. I've heard some bad things about the Remington 710's.  I'd go with a Savage or Stevens.

 

3. For a low priced rifle, Savage.  For a moderate priced rifle, Ruger.

 

4. Yes.

 

5.  Somewhat.  Go with Leupold and you won't regret it.

 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I have a Leupold VX-2 3-9x40 on my Remington 7600 .243 cal.. If a scope is still sighted in after sitting all summer thats what I call a good scope and the Leupold does that.I am however haveing trouble adjusting to the smaller field of view that I had from the Tasco TV view  that I had on the rifle. I started having trouble keeping the Tasco sighted in so I bought the Leupold.

 

I wish the new Leupold VX-L 50 MM. had been out when I bought the scope because Ive got a Simmons 2.5-10X50 on my Remington 700 BDL 243. and I dont like the high mounts of the 50mm to keep the bell off the barrel.

 

http://www.leupold.com/products/vx-l.htm

 

I have always been a Remington man and I was truly dissapointed to see the 710 searies come out. To my way of thinking it was a terrible management decision to try for a cheaper market in what was a reliable rifle.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Speakin' of inexpensive rifles, anyone had a chance to handle one of Mossberg's new rifles?  They just came out with a new '4x4' Rifle.  I'm kinda curious about them.  I am also seriously interested in the new "JIC" (just in case) series of m500 shotguns in the storage tubes.

 

New trivia:

 

What was the problem/complaint with Sam Colt's first revolver (hint: it wasn't a handgun!).

 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Speakin' of inexpensive rifles, anyone had a chance to handle one of Mossberg's new rifles?  They just came out with a new '4x4' Rifle.  I'm kinda curious about them.  I am also seriously interested in the new "JIC" (just in case) series of m500 shotguns in the storage tubes.

 

New trivia:

 

What was the problem/complaint with Sam Colt's first revolver (hint: it wasn't a handgun!).

 

 

 

Took too long to load?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Speakin' of inexpensive rifles, anyone had a chance to handle one of Mossberg's new rifles?  They just came out with a new '4x4' Rifle.  I'm kinda curious about them.  I am also seriously interested in the new "JIC" (just in case) series of m500 shotguns in the storage tubes.

 

New trivia:

 

What was the problem/complaint with Sam Colt's first revolver (hint: it wasn't a handgun!).

 

 

 

Took too long to load?

 

Actually, the firearm in question used very nearly the same loading system as Colt's cap and ball revolvers (this is another hint).  I wouldn't doubt that if you had emptied the cylinder (sp?) it would seem to take an eternity to reload when you had a pack of hostiles to deal with!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
Sign in to follow this  

×