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Super Squirrels Trekking Tutorial

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Breathability in raingear is different based on the material the raingear is made with.  With PVC or polyurethane-coated nylon raingear, breathability is created by zippers under the arms or on the chest to allow warm air to escape the chest area.  This raingear and can get hot in the summer but are extremely waterproof.  But they also weight a bit more than the pourous materials. Very durable.  This is the kind of raingear you see the crab fishermen on "Deadliest Catch" wear.  Water can get in the vents too.

 

Then you have pourous materials such as 3M Propore, Goretex or Thinsulate.  These materials allows water vapor (sweat) to escape through the fabric via tiny holes  in the surface.  These holes are designed to be only small enough for the vapor to pass but not large enough to allow water droplets through. Check this out.....

 

 

The porous mateials are extremely breathable.  They tend to be a bit less burable than the PVC.  You must be a bit more careful with it.  Some brands do let some water through.  I swear by my yellow micropore though.  It is extremely waterproof, light, very breathable.  They are a bit fragile but work fine if you are careful with it.  No sitting on rough rocks. You can get a set like my O2 Rainshield cylcing gear for about $50.  Order them a size larger.  Your going to put clothes under them remember.

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Dave, Ashley and I are cheering!  What an awesome video!  :thumbsup: 

 

Great stuff, my friend!  :arigato:

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Dave - The accuracy and thoroughness with which you are presenting this is straight out of the Outdoor Recreation 101 curriculum in a college classroom..... or should be. This is awsome!!.  What makes it all the more credible though is that your comes from a lifetime of hard use and experience.... your's.

 

PLEASE.... keep it comming!!

 

On the topic of rainwear: Many people believe that hiking in a rainjacket of any material type is useless because the amount of water vapor the body produces is much greater than can be transpired thru the fabric and you just end up getting wet anyway. So.... just suck it up and know that although the physical activity should keep you warm, you will be wet.

 

Any thoughts?

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Unless it is a very cold rain, I get too warm hiking in raingear.  I bought a nice lightweight raincoat with mesh lining and vents (thanks, Lead Dog, for that advice!) with a bill on the hood to protect my face and it is VERY comfortable.  I haven't found a good pair of rain pants though.  The ones I have are all rubbery feeling and hot and uncomfortable.  I'd love some advice for some good ones.

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Hey we got our celebrity movie star now its DAVE :cool:

 

Where Dave hikes as he explains the weather can change rapidly. Everyones right about the sweat and on a nice warm atmospher I prefer to go without rain gear. However as Dave points out a summitt can be very cold sometimes and catching you wet can be dangerous. I had not seen rain gear before with the fabric Dave demonstrated. Good stuff Dave. :thumbup:

 

Dave What would be the best course of action for the hiker in a rain day situation when faced with sudden temperature changes?

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Guest adrenjunky

Good stuff  :thumbup:

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Dave What would be the best course of action for the hiker in a rain day situation when faced with sudden temperature changes?

  This would depend on two things.  1) Your physical condition.  Are you sick or injured?  Then you should consider getting out of the woods till you recover. 2) The tempatures.  If it's extremely warm outside say temps in the 80's or up.  Then you can pretty much leave your raingear in your pack.  If it's 60-80 degrees I'd wear my gear.  Temps in the mountains can vary greatly and weather conditions can change with little notice.  I've seen it bright and sunny with temps near 80 at the foot of a mountain then when I approached the summit it changed to freezing horizontal (sideways) rain with 80mph winds in just a couple hours :ranting:.  Always keep your raingear close at hand where you can get at it quickly.  I keep mine in a outside pocket on my pack so I don't have to dig through the main compartment to get to it if there is a sudden down pour.  If it's raining all day and cool then keep your gear on and dress light.  It's better to be dry and a little cool rather than let yourself get to warm.  Lugging a 40 lbs pack up and down hills will warm you up nicely. :woot:

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quote from Dave>

 

Temps in the mountains can vary greatly and weather conditions can change with little notice.  I've seen it bright and sunny with temps near 80 at the foot of a mountain then when I approached the summit it changed to freezing horizontal (sideways) rain with 80mph winds in just a couple hours.

 

So it depends on what area your trekking as to what clothes your taking or wearing. Not so much the time of the year but being aware of changing condidions in the area. Ive never hiked over a mountain and Im afraid at this point I never will.

Thanks for the information. Good point. :thumbup:

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I usually take a small Am/Fm radio with me on my trips so I can hear weather reports.  I'll listen to the reports early in the mornings before I hit the trail so I can rearrange the stuff in my pack to fit the needs of each day.  You do have to do a bit of your own weather forecasting because the weather at ground level can be very different than what's going on in the hills.

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Wow a bear must have ate some stuff on the boards Dave. What have we lost? Looks like your going to have to start typing all over again. :'(

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Backpacks-  My very first backpack was a $20 external frame p.o.s. that I bought from a so called freind of mine.  The thing had absolutely no padding on the shoulder straps but being a novice then, I didn't know what I was getting into.  I put at least 55 lbs. of gear into that thing and dragged it to the Dry River valley near Mount Washington in New Hampshire for 3 glorious days.  On my first day with the new pack I had the belt and shoulder straps come apart when a ring snapped on a pin that held the straps to the frame.  Normally something like this wouldn't have bothered me.  What bothered me was the timing.  I was 1/2 way across a tributary for the Dry River hopping from rock to rock.  In the ensuing ruckus I managed to keep myself mostly dry except for 1 leg.  Midway through the next day I dubbed my new toy "The Torture Rack!!"  Too much weight and no padding and 11 miles of extremely rugged terrain was turning my shoulders and hips to hamburger.  Thankfully my last day was a mere 3 mile walk downhill to the car.  I arrived at home tired and sore just in time to have fate kick me once for good measure.  Sitting in my garage was the brand new internal frame backpack I had ordered and was hoping would arrive before I left.  But alas this was not to be.  I learned a lot of things about packs that trip.  :squirrel: :idea:  Buy yourself a raincover for your pack.  It should be big enough to fit over your pack and all the stuff you might have on the outside.

 

    1) Weight-  For trekking I would suggest that for a maximum weight for people to carry is 1/3 of their body weight for men and 1/4 of their body weight for women.  Depending of course on your physical fitness of course.  My pack with gear weighs about 30-35 pounds on average.  That's with about a weeks worth of food.  I could cut the weight more but I like my comforts.  Remember if you purchase your pack from a store to put weight in the packs before you try them on.  this will give you a better idea of how it will ride on you in the woods.  The clerk will help you adjust it too. 

 

    2) Padding-  Make sure the pack you use has plenty of padding both on the shoulders and on the hip belt.  The hip belt especially because that is where most of the pack's weight will be riding.  The shoulder straps basically keep the pack pressed up aginst you.

 

    3) Air circulation-  Put a sack over your shoulder and walk around for 6-8 hours.  Now where you find the pack comes into contact with your body , your clothes will be soaked with perspiration.  A lot of modern packs have special channels in the padding and frame that allows air to pass over your back keeping you cooler and drier.  This feature is definitely a plus.

 

    4) Cubic inches-  This is obviously how much room you have to stuff gear into your pack.  A good pack will range from about 4000ci to 6000ci.  Smaller than 4000ci is only good for overniters, day hiking or for a BOB.  Large than 6000ci and you wind up carrying a lot of stuff you probably won't even use neccassarily.  My personal packs are around 4500ci.  You won't read this anyway but here but I believe that a 4500ci internal frame will handle slightly more gear than a 4500ci external frame.  This is due to that extra large main compartment.  Strapping stuff to the outside doesn't count.

 

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External frame packs-  Traditionally back packs started out as external frame.  This is a cloth sack that is supported by lightweight aluminum tubes on the outside.  The frame typically has a system of straps and pads to keep the sack and the frame from contacting the body. The open structure has the added benefit of improved ventilation and decreasing sweatiness.  Areas of the frame can be used to attach large bulky items such as tents or sleeping bags to the outside.  Thus the main compartment is smaller than that of an internal-frame pack, because bulky items are strapped to the parts of the frame not occupied by the main compartment itself.

 

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Internal frame packs-  An internal-frame pack has a large cloth part in which a small frame is integrated. This frame can consist of strips of aluminum or specially designed polymer that molds to one's back to provide a good fit.  Internal-frame packs may provide a few lash points, but as the frame is fully integrated and not available on the outside, it is difficult to lash a large, heavy item so that it stays fixed and does not bounce, so most cargo must fit inside.  Internal-frame packs  because of their snug fit, ride better in activities that involve upper-body movement; such as scrambling over rocky surfaces or bushwhacking. The internal frame packs have largely replaced external frame backpacks. In Europe hardly any external-frame models are sold anymore, but in the United States, some manufacturers continue to produce them, and military packs (aka- ALICE gear) repurposed for outdoors use are often external-frame designs as well.

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Dave don't some think you should be" measured " for a correct fit for a back pack? What do they "measure"?

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Oh, that's the post I had put up that got lost!  I had said how impressed I was by the salesperson at REI.  She measured me for my daypack and backpack so they would fit perfectly.  And they do!  I love REI. 

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I'm going to cover the sleeping system next.  Sleeping bags, pads and tents. :peace:

 

Dave? Im waiting to sleep. :yawn:

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Me too!  Hurry up, Dave!  I want to get a mat instead of my air mattress unless I get a better air pump.  My arms were killing me after using Ashley's bicycle pump for an hour!  :grin:

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Colman has 12 volt rechargeable air mattress pumps. I got one and it works great.

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OK.  I've slacked enough,  I'll get working on my next part.  I was waiting for my camera to come back from being repaired so I can take pics but I have no idea when that will be.  So I'm going to get one of those disposable digital cameras and try that.  I'll take pics of the MCP now that the project is underway.  But I'll put those in a different post.

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That sounds like an excellent plan slacker guy er squirrel :hugegrin: :P

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